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Help me start a Classical collection - Page 2

post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Facade19 View Post
If you are looking for pieces with great harmonical mastering I highly recommend Gabriel Faure. His piano quintets and violin sonatas are just absolutely beautiful!
Faure is a god! And his piano quartets are among my favorite pieces of chamber music.
post #17 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMahler View Post
Faure is a god! And his piano quartets are among my favorite pieces of chamber music.
Pavane is one of the most eloquent works I had the fortune to listen to.
Simple breath-taking.
post #18 of 36
I'm so happy to see head-fi is chock full of classical lovers.
post #19 of 36
Since we're all agreed on the Brandenburg Concertos, it might be worth mentioning that there's a thread in the computer audio forum with a link to free downloads, in flac.
post #20 of 36
post #21 of 36
Shameless plug: there's no better way to start a classical collection than with free stuff from the thread in my sig. Everything must go by tomorrow!
post #22 of 36
If you like more of series type thing, Holst's The Planets is very nice. Jupiter is my favorite, I just really like it. Also, I enjoy Mahler's 1st symphony! For soloist violins, get pretty much anything by Itzhak Perlman! I saw him live; amazing!
post #23 of 36
My strongest recommendation about purchasing classical music is don't necessarilly go with a budget version just because its cheaper. At the same time don't think a version that costs twice as much is better, sometimes naxos has a very good deal. But its important when building a library to get to know which composers certain conductors are good at, or certain violinists are known for, or certain pianists specialize in.

Some pianists such as Alfred Brendel specialize almost exclusively in the Austrogerman composers from the classical and Romantic periods. Specifically Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Liszt, Brahms and a few others. It is rare that Brendel performs Chopin. Even Bach is a rarity for Brendel. If you go for any classical piano piece by any of the composers I listed and choose Brendel then you are buying a performance that is definitely worth a listen.

Herbert von Karajan is a safe conductor in many instances. The are better conductors overall, but Karajan covered a vast amount of repertoire on record. You're fairly safe with any Karajan recording unless its a Baroque composer.

For the Baroque I recommend period instruments. Period instruments mean that the instruments used on the recording are from the period of which the piece was written. Unlike most, I prefer to hear my Bach keyboard works on harpsichord which they were intended for, not piano.

For violin music I recommend Itzhak Perlman as a reference point. His tone is very thick and lush. Perlman shines in almost every romantic violin concerto I've heard him play. Other violinists such as Anne Sophie Mutter or Maxim Vengerov and the great Jascha Heifetz are more interesting in different ways, but as reference violinist try Perlman

For chamber music, specifically string quartets there are many great ones, but I feel a great quartet that is active today and shines in everything they try is the Takacs Quartet. No they don't make the russian composers sing like the Borodin Quartet, and they don't do modern composers as well as the Emersons, but they are really good all round.

Great Chopin pianist: Arthur Rubinstein for the old world style or Maurizio Pollini for a more modern virtuosic approach

Great Beethoven conductor: Carlos Kleiber or Herbert von Karajan. No one does the 6th like Bruno Walter though. And if you want to hear who the world will probably always consider the best Beethoven conductor ever recorded, try Furtwangler, but don't expect sonic glory.

Great Mozart pianist: Murray Perahia for the concertos, Maria Joao Pires for the sonatas

Great Haydn conductor: Sir Colin Davis!

Great Sibelius Conductor: Sir Colin Davis again....Neeme Jarvi is excellent as well

Great Mahler Conductor: There are many great Mahler conductors and I feel Mahler is the only composer which when buying a complete cycle you really do yourself a disservice as I can't think of a single conductor who mastered all 10 symphonies. Bruno Walter, who knew Mahler most intimately along with Otto Klemperer are great starting points for a Mahler collection.

Great Brahms conductor: Bruno Walter is a safe bet with Brahms. Carlos Kleiber's 4th is almost universally considered the winner though.

Great Bach ensemble: Tafelmusik......Tafelmusik tends to be fantastic with any Baroque music.

Great Bach harpsichordist: I personally love Pierre Hantia, but I have to mention Wanda Landowska

Lastly, I think you should try a Wagnerian opera just to have that experience. My favorite is Tristan und Isolde. And the greatest recording ever made in stereo is Karl Bohm's
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMahler View Post
My strongest recommendation about purchasing classical music is don't necessarilly go with a budget version just because its cheaper. At the same time don't think a version that costs twice as much is better, sometimes naxos has a very good deal. But its important when building a library to get to know which composers certain conductors are good at, or certain violinists are known for, or certain pianists specialize in.

Some pianists such as Alfred Brendel specialize almost exclusively in the Austrogerman composers from the classical and Romantic periods. Specifically Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Liszt, Brahms and a few others. It is rare that Brendel performs Chopin. Even Bach is a rarity for Brendel. If you go for any classical piano piece by any of the composers I listed and choose Brendel then you are buying a performance that is definitely worth a listen.

Herbert von Karajan is a safe conductor in many instances. The are better conductors overall, but Karajan covered a vast amount of repertoire on record. You're fairly safe with any Karajan recording unless its a Baroque composer.

For the Baroque I recommend period instruments. Period instruments mean that the instruments used on the recording are from the period of which the piece was written. Unlike most, I prefer to hear my Bach keyboard works on harpsichord which they were intended for, not piano.

For violin music I recommend Itzhak Perlman as a reference point. His tone is very thick and lush. Perlman shines in almost every romantic violin concerto I've heard him play. Other violinists such as Anne Sophie Mutter or Maxim Vengerov and the great Jascha Heifetz are more interesting in different ways, but as reference violinist try Perlman

For chamber music, specifically string quartets there are many great ones, but I feel a great quartet that is active today and shines in everything they try is the Takacs Quartet. No they don't make the russian composers sing like the Borodin Quartet, and they don't do modern composers as well as the Emersons, but they are really good all round.

Great Chopin pianist: Arthur Rubinstein for the old world style or Maurizio Pollini for a more modern virtuosic approach

Great Beethoven conductor: Carlos Kleiber or Herbert von Karajan. No one does the 6th like Bruno Walter though. And if you want to hear who the world will probably always consider the best Beethoven conductor ever recorded, try Furtwangler, but don't expect sonic glory.

Great Mozart pianist: Murray Perahia for the concertos, Maria Joao Pires for the sonatas

Great Haydn conductor: Sir Colin Davis!

Great Sibelius Conductor: Sir Colin Davis again....Neeme Jarvi is excellent as well

Great Mahler Conductor: There are many great Mahler conductors and I feel Mahler is the only composer which when buying a complete cycle you really do yourself a disservice as I can't think of a single conductor who mastered all 10 symphonies. Bruno Walter, who knew Mahler most intimately along with Otto Klemperer are great starting points for a Mahler collection.

Great Brahms conductor: Bruno Walter is a safe bet with Brahms. Carlos Kleiber's 4th is almost universally considered the winner though.

Great Bach ensemble: Tafelmusik......Tafelmusik tends to be fantastic with any Baroque music.

Great Bach harpsichordist: I personally love Pierre Hantia, but I have to mention Wanda Landowska

Lastly, I think you should try a Wagnerian opera just to have that experience. My favorite is Tristan und Isolde. And the greatest recording ever made in stereo is Karl Bohm's
Nice post. I question though...have you heard Mutter's Kreutzer? Once you hear her butcher this remarkable piece into crabmeat you'll see her in a different light.
post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agent Kang View Post
Nice post. I question though...have you heard Mutter's Kreutzer? Once you hear her butcher this remarkable piece into crabmeat you'll see her in a different light.
Mutter does the best Brahms Violin concerto hands down with the NYPO and Kurt Masur
post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMahler View Post
Mutter does the best Brahms Violin concerto hands down with the NYPO and Kurt Masur
I'm partial to Oistrakh/Szell myself, although I do find Mutter's Berg VC to be exceptional. I only heard her Brahms with Karajan which I wasn't too impressed.
post #27 of 36
Yeah Oistrakh's is awesome. Mutter's Berg is the best! Her recording of the Brahms concerto with Karajan is so early in her career, I think her second recording is the most exciting violin recording I own. I also love her Sibelius concerto with Previn
post #28 of 36
Well one thing's for certain; you can never own enough versions of Brahm's VC.

I have put in an order for Mutter/Mazur. Very much looking forward to hearing it.
post #29 of 36
Thread Starter 
Ok finally I have my JS Bach Brandenburg Concertos 1 - 6 and Violin Concertos. It's a boxed set of 3 CDs from Galaxy music EU.

I have to admit I ma kinda bit dissapointed with the recording quality. Don't get me wrong, I jumped into classical because I was enthralled by Ultrasone Binaural Samples where there's a couple of exciting classical tracks recorded using binaural technology.

So specifically, which classical recording should I look into - Audiophile/Binaural recording preferred
post #30 of 36
There's a binaural version of Glenn Gould's Goldberg Variations from Zenph; I haven't heard it myself, but there was a thread on it here where people were quite positive.
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