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Has the mp3 ruined the glory of the Album? - Page 3

post #31 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by casull View Post
Some albums deserve to be listened to cohesively, some are just collections of songs. I've heard great cohesive albums that should never listened to other than in their entirety, and then I've heard albums that are just collections of distinct songs, with no real relation to each other. There are good albums in both categories, I think.
Agreed. Plus, sometimes there are only a handfull of songs that are actually worth listening to on the album.
post #32 of 61
One of the things my Wife likes about using my KSC75 with the in-line vol control on her iPod, is being able to instantly adjust the vol up or down since it can vary so much from one random song to another since she listens to everything mixed from show tunes to current rock to classic Country.

A problem I don't have with CDs on my old PCDP.
post #33 of 61
I am an album person too...

Once I either add a new harddrive or buy a new pc I am gonna rip most of my dads music... he probably has about 200-300 cds and about 100lps but he isnt like you guys where music is a hobby, he just puts music on, and often listens to radio...

I only buy songs online if it is a powerful song from a genre that I don't care for except for these few songs
post #34 of 61
I think the mp3 (and digital archiving in general) is terrific for the consumer. The ability to either rip high quality music from a CD I've purchased or steal it from P2P networks has allowed me to amass a collection in a few months that would have taken years on what I make as a student. Also, since there's no financial loss, there's no reason for me not to try unknown artists, which has expanded my tastes exponentially. There's a prevailing ethic among thieves in the circles I steal in that encourages one to support the artists you really like, and I do, because I think performers who genuinely love music will go on making it, regardless of market trends.
post #35 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Altoids View Post
Also, since there's no financial loss, there's no reason for me not to try unknown artists, which has expanded my tastes exponentially. There's a prevailing ethic among thieves in the circles I steal in that encourages one to support the artists you really like, and I do, because I think performers who genuinely love music will go on making it, regardless of market trends.
This is so completely true. The legitimate venues for finding new music, especially finding recordings of hard-to-find bands, are few and far between. I know, just KNOW, that I would be listening to far inferior music if I had not had free access to whatever I was curious about these last few years.
post #36 of 61
Yes.
post #37 of 61
Downloading has just allowed the music industry to revert to its original business model. Before the idea of albums became central to many music fans, most people just bought singles in the form of 7" 45s. Quite a bit of the music-buying public has always been suspicious of filler on albums (even during the digital/CD era), and now the various means of digital distribution has empowered them again. I'm not sure it's killing the idea of the album among folks who prefer purchasing artists who can sustain some kind of thematic arc (which I consider myself), but it's certainly making it easier for consumers to weed out a lot of unwanted music.
post #38 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coltrane View Post
All actual music fans I know still buy albums or atleast download and listen to albums. The problem is the younger generation is buying just singles. As a guitar teacher I find myself practically begging my students to download or purchase full albums, because that is where they get full appreciation of an artist. The problem is the difference between 1 and 10 bucks is pretty significant for a 14 year old.
yeah, i don't really know anybody my age that gets whole albums. not that i care anyway; i'm going to guess that in the 60s and 70s people still bought way more 7" singles than full LPs.

and at the OP, most people that only listen to single songs (emphasis on the only, i enjoy shuffling sometimes) would still do so without internet downloads. for me, the internet is the reason why i am able to listen to full albums; i'm fairly poor.
post #39 of 61
Bahahahaha. Monk and Coltrane, together again!
post #40 of 61
thelonious monk is actually my birth-name.
post #41 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thelonious Monk View Post
thelonious monk is actually my birth-name.
You're a *******ed liar. You must have the coolest parents on earth.
post #42 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Altoids View Post
You're a *******ed liar. You must have the coolest parents on earth.
the esoteric appeal is worth the beatings.
post #43 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thelonious Monk View Post
the esoteric appeal is worth the beatings.
Simpsons for the win.
post #44 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digitalbath3737 View Post
The mp3 isn't doing anything bad for the album at all. More artist are getting recognized because of mp3s. What's killing the album are artist that don't have enough talent to put out a decent album.
Have to disagree with lack of talent. Rather, where talent is being put. Whole albums have never been the mainstay. Popular for little bits here and there, but not normal, except among music lovers.

Now, more than ever, those in the positions to produce and promote are where talent is being put as far as anything mainstream is concerned. There's less mainstream stuff to choose from, in attempts to maximize profits. Thus, you've got musical talent mostly scattered about randomly, more of it than ever not being really able to reach anything close to their potential.

As far as downloads in general go, I think what we're seeing is people less into music becoming more important in terms of purchasing power. For the ability to make a lossless rip alone, I'd get CDs (now, if Apple were to offer non-DRM ALAC albums for $8 or under each...), even when most CDs are single collections, not cohesive albums. Most people I know that get DLed tunes have almost no complete albums, and don't have much that isn't heavily played. I only personally know one exception. Single tracks sate the needs of the consumer, who consumes and uses music, rather than experience and cherish it.

In the case of CDs with only a small number of good tracks, someone just isn't cutting it, be it the artist, producer, or someone else at the label. If they can't put more than 10-15 minutes of good stuff on there, it's being made too quick, or is sacrificing something.
post #45 of 61
҉ Playlists trumps albums.
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