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Is Audiophile level sound an acquired taste? - Page 16

post #226 of 244
For some people the picture below is art and for others its just an underdone sketch of two men.

post #227 of 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrookR1 View Post
Maybe it takes time to learn how to listen to music. And once they do this, it'll all make sense to them.
It does't take any time to learn how to listen to music. Children listen to music with great joy. It takes time to learn how to listen to gear, often time out from actually listening to the music. His friends aren't wrong. If a big bass boost and noise isolation helps them get into the music, and listening for resolution, transparency and balance distracts them from it, I say leave them alone. There is nothing wrong with owning a couple of amps and a few pair of cans and listening to different presentations of the music. But it is a separate thing from listening to the music. I think we lose sight of that sometimes.

Tim
post #228 of 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamwhisper View Post
Part of what I like so much about this hobby is the ability to find my idea of the perfect sound.
Which ironically along the way involves my ears getting burnt in (learning) just as much as it does me hearing exactly what I'm looking for.

I consider this akin to dancing in a very delicate and personal/heartfelt way.
...And cutting through a lot of bullsh1t imho.


Then you are one of those people who are willing to learn. Congtrats. If more people felt as you do, our little corner of the world would be so little.
post #229 of 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by I-Love-Music View Post
Thanks for the info.
Man, are you a student? More 'thanks' posts than I've ever seen ....bumping for the FS forums?
post #230 of 244
Agree, posts like that only for postcount is in bad taste
post #231 of 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by nor_spoon View Post
Agree, posts like that only for postcount is in bad taste
Well, subtle he aint, that's for sure...
post #232 of 244
Sure fooled me.
post #233 of 244
I'm guessing his next appearance will be in the FS forums...
post #234 of 244
The best way to add to postcount is to talk crap like i do.
post #235 of 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by tfarney View Post
It does't take any time to learn how to listen to music. Children listen to music with great joy. It takes time to learn how to listen to gear, often time out from actually listening to the music. His friends aren't wrong. If a big bass boost and noise isolation helps them get into the music, and listening for resolution, transparency and balance distracts them from it, I say leave them alone. There is nothing wrong with owning a couple of amps and a few pair of cans and listening to different presentations of the music. But it is a separate thing from listening to the music. I think we lose sight of that sometimes.

Tim
So u mean to say Music is in our instincts? its just that out instincts have been weakened by burdens of life?
post #236 of 244
There are people who're just tasteless, you can't deny it. Like people who prefer Mcdonalds over real food with fresh ingredients.
post #237 of 244
I personally leave people alone. If someone thinks a Japanese copy Electric guitar sounds as good as a custom made Fender Telecaster from California that is six times the price, so be it. It's not worth the argument. Probably better they don't know.
post #238 of 244
Reading through this thread, you guys have some of the wisest and most deep down and philosophical takes on stuff that I have seen on the internet for quite some time though I thought that this was the best place to ask this comparatively un-inspired question. For the longest time, every time I hear a poor, compressed audio track, or a bad pair of headphones it almost seems like it's doing a disservice to music not listening to it the best way you can. (For some that may be beats or iBuds).

The first time I got a pair of proper headphones it instantly put the biggest smile on my face listening to the newly revealed depth and dimension of the music. This was only about 2 years ago and so far I've only upgraded into different sets a few times. I now that I finally have the budget for a summit-fi tier headphone I'm quite ecstatic. The only thing that is bothering me is that I almost feel that sound is in some ways like a fine wine, sure most people can taste the difference between two buck chuck and a French Pinot, but to truly value that difference you need to have honed in your sense of taste and have a wide frame of reference.

Looking at the gear almost gives a sense that I haven't "earned" the right to appreciate it. What are your opinions? Would I be better off learning to appreciate headphones by putting my budget into a range of mid-tier headphones and later go big, or am I just being slightly neurotic?
post #239 of 244

I think it's worth saying that there's no guarantee that you'll like a summit-fi headphone anymore than a mid-tier. Beyond a certain point comes diminishing returns, and some have climbed the summit only to find that they were happier at mid-tier (for instance, people moving up from HD650 to HD800, or from Beyer DT880 to T1, then going back again). For the majority of people mid-tier is enough. I've owned Audeze LCD-2 and HiFiman HE-500 but currently use, quite happily, a DT880 Pro. There is generally a huge difference between a $100 headphone and a $400 one, but far less between a $400 one and a $1500 one.

 

That said, I don't want to discourage you from trying out the top-tier; just don't expect a revelation. And if you don't hear enough difference to justify the extra, don't think your ears are at fault. Phones like the HD650, DT880 and AKG K702 are capable, with good matching gear, of an astonishing performance, even if not quite as astonishing as the best.

post #240 of 244

What's up with all the necroing lately?

 

To add onto the thread anyways, it most definitely is, or at least it was for me. My school's ideology behind headphones is that they must have bass and isolation (or NC. Whichever. They believe noise isolation and noise cancellation are the same thing though), hence them thinking the D5000s are the best. No attention to detail, blending of the frequencies, soundstage, etc. Most people I know of think that bass = sound quality whether or not it's muddy.

 

I definitely was in the basshead area like 5 years ago in middle school (basshead as in I like rumbling), but after moving to the M50s to what I have tested and have now, I still do prefer bass to be above neutral, but only slightly (my most listened to genre is trance and rap so). LCD-2 / HE-400 bass. My school likes to crank up the subwoofers though at events. I don't disagree with cranking them up, but they crank it to the max such that the whole gym is vibrating and you can't hear anything but the vibrations. The influx of hip-hop and trap music pretty much reinforces this thinking.

 

And then price is also a big issue because many people think audiophile headphones are ugly, though I'd say those are an acquired taste too. I used to dislike the looks of say, the LCD-2 or the HiFiMANs, but now I think they look amazing. With Beats, I guess they don't feel so bad splurging for the fashion accessory aspect, disregarding the fact that they also believe they're the best. With the Apple buds, they cost nothing pretty much if you don't break them since pretty much every person who isn't an audiophile looooooooooooves Apple products (exaggerating but pretty close to the truth in my school) and they're also pretty much fashion accessories now, like Apple itself.

 

Lots of bias.


Edited by AyeVeeN - 7/17/14 at 5:20am
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