Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Is Audiophile level sound an acquired taste?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Is Audiophile level sound an acquired taste? - Page 9

post #121 of 237
And that is really strange. It is impossible to hear the record of piano without a noise. But only with that instrument there is so much noise. Why?
post #122 of 237
I am a strong believer in people's zeal and passion in a hobby of one sort or another. Unless they were forced into a situation where such luxury was never allowed, I would feel sad for a person without any such motive to carry themselves on through life. To reiterate, most anyone has something they set high priority on and are willing to channel more effort and resources into. No two human beings are identical, and therefore it is inevitable everyone would have differences in what he or she so cherishes.

Another idea I storngly advocate is mutuality of respect. If you intend to be respected as a well-mannered human being, it would be wise to avoid "pushing buttons". A person so carelessly spitting out outright disregard for my lifestyle choices would certainly not fare well in that regard. I would interpret this as a sign that the person have no interest in further forging a strong friendship of any measure. Though I wont turn my back on them right away, I would feel somewhat distanced from him or her conciously and subconciously.

One of my x-roomates was an avid automobile afficianodo, when I am almost uninterested in cars in general. Likewise, he is not a single bit interested in hi-fi audio from what I can tell. Yet we were cool about each other's hobbies and were very respectful and civil towards each other when delving into such topic. The world would be a better place if same could be expected from most others...
post #123 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMahler View Post
[...]My friend who loves Dylan, Lou Reed and Tom Waits feels this way....says he prefers the vocals by those guys more than Stevie Wonder or Jeff Buckley or Paul McCartney. He knows that the latter three are better singers in that they address the melody with more understanding and their timbre is more controlled. However, he just prefers the raw quality of a less skilled singer[...]
Ooooops!...Here's the post that comes back to haunt you, David! Can you imagine Sinatra singing "Tangled Up in Blue"? Ouch!

Buddy, Dylan (our Billie Holiday in trousers) is living proof that you don't need a voice to sing like an emotional hurricane! (Tip: Check out the remastered "Street-Legal", one of the most gut-wrenching experiences in pop music, bar none.)

Okay: Off topic -- but not by much!

Cheers,
post #124 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by die kassette View Post
And that is really strange. It is impossible to hear the record of piano without a noise. But only with that instrument there is so much noise. Why?
What do you mean? I have some awesome clean recordings of piano, its just that majority of classical recordings are from the middle of last century (and hence inevitable tape-hiss).
post #125 of 237
I don't know if the following is true but here it goes.

A friend (of the very audiophile type) once told me that it was proven ( some kind of study I suppose) that a truly musical person could do with less than audiophile quality reproduction, because they know in their mind how things are supposed to sound and are able to compensate accordingly. A less musical person don't have this ability and hence needs a higher quality reproduction.

Not sure if this means that audiophile people are below average regarding musicality .
post #126 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamprologus View Post
I don't know if the following is true but here it goes.

A friend (of the very audiophile type) once told me that it was proven ( some kind of study I suppose) that a truly musical person could do with less than audiophile quality reproduction, because they know in their mind how things are supposed to sound and are able to compensate accordingly. A less musical person don't have this ability and hence needs a higher quality reproduction.

Not sure if this means that audiophile people are below average regarding musicality .
Then that truly musical person is very rare. You have to admit, some of the most amazing jazz/classical musicians are quality tone whores, be it out of reproduction equipment or their instrument. Thats not a very useful study in that sense lol.
post #127 of 237
"How something is supposed to sound" is incredibly subjective these days though.

Guitar players search for the right sound. Electronic music doesn't have anything you could call a reference.

For most modern music there really isn't anything to "fill in," it's there or it's not.
post #128 of 237
yeah i think it's aquired, so many of my friends look at me with my shure's and go 'wtf' and then proclaim the greatness of the iBud.

i just let them be!
post #129 of 237
Yes, I think audiophile sound is an acquired taste. People miss their fuzzmaster distortomatic bassmonster sound systems until they've settled into a hi-fi system for at least half an hour. Also, they should be allowed to play whatever music that they like.
post #130 of 237
Another take:

You know that feeling when you're switching between two totally different cans/IEMs? When you switch, from bass heavy phones to flatter, slightly bright phones? When you switch to brighter headphones, they'll, at first, seem really tinny and, well, bright. After maybe an hour of listening, your brain will adjust to the sound signature. Conversely, switching from bright/flat headphones to the aforementioned bass heavy ones will result in a very boomy first impression. That's probably why Friend Y noted that they sounded like a cell phone speaker and asked where the bass went. K701's are very flat throughout the spectrum IIRC, and the lack of bass would, to his ears at first, make them sound tinny.

I explained it like crap, but that's what I think.
post #131 of 237
I've actually gotten great results when letting my friends listen to my Denon AH-D2000. Quite recently I let two of my friends (who have no interest in audio/hifi what so ever) listen to them, before - none of them thought they'd be worth the price, after - both considered them well worth the price. Sure, they're no L3000 when it comes to price, but still more than most people (at first) would spend on a pair of headphones.
post #132 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by saboteur1 View Post
Another take:

You know that feeling when you're switching between two totally different cans/IEMs? When you switch, from bass heavy phones to flatter, slightly bright phones? When you switch to brighter headphones, they'll, at first, seem really tinny and, well, bright. After maybe an hour of listening, your brain will adjust to the sound signature. Conversely, switching from bright/flat headphones to the aforementioned bass heavy ones will result in a very boomy first impression. That's probably why Friend Y noted that they sounded like a cell phone speaker and asked where the bass went. K701's are very flat throughout the spectrum IIRC, and the lack of bass would, to his ears at first, make them sound tinny.

I explained it like crap, but that's what I think.
No, you did an excellent job.
post #133 of 237
just wanted to chime in...my roommate preferred the hd280 to the k501 because "I know what I like and that's bass." I wanted to punch him when I heard that haha
post #134 of 237
I think the first requirement is to be interested. Kind of like French films. Some people call them art, I just call them French films; and mostly wonder why they were made at all.

The only piece of kit that I own that ever got any really positive response when trialled by my friends were my HD540 reference gold. My friends loved them; and they were singly the leats expensive part fo my rig at the time.

Go figure.
post #135 of 237
In my experience it's not that high quality audio is an acquired taste, but that spending money to get it is.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Headphones (full-size)
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Is Audiophile level sound an acquired taste?