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What Are You Listening To Right Now? -New thread, new rules. Please read them. - Page 3546

post #53176 of 70976
fz6s13.gifbe9dev.gif

Edited by cb3723 - 6/24/14 at 8:18pm
post #53177 of 70976
^ Could you please stop including the gooey spinning fonts and epileptic gifs with each post?!
post #53178 of 70976
Quote:
Originally Posted by kurochin View Post

^ Could you please stop including the gooey spinning fonts and epileptic gifs with each post?!

Oh, - U don't like em?

I like gooey biggrin.gif

They go with type of music I'm into, but I'll cut them down to every now and then rather than every post?

K? smily_headphones1.gif

(sorry frown.gif)
Edited by cb3723 - 6/24/14 at 7:44pm
post #53179 of 70976
Quote:
Originally Posted by cb3723 View Post

Oh, - U don't like em?

I like gooey biggrin.gif

They go with type of music I'm into, but I'll cut them down to every now and then rather than every post?

K? smily_headphones1.gif

(sorry frown.gif)

Put lines between them, and they won't be so wide.
post #53180 of 70976

Product Details

post #53181 of 70976

AppleMark

post #53182 of 70976
Quote:
Originally Posted by cb3723 View Post


Oh, - U don't like em?

I like gooey biggrin.gif

They go with type of music I'm into, but I'll cut them down to every now and then rather than every post?

K? smily_headphones1.gif

(sorry frown.gif)


They wreck havoc on the thread when viewing with a mobile phone.

post #53183 of 70976


Fantastic mastering for a fantastic live performance. Joshua Redman - Trios Live
post #53184 of 70976

post #53185 of 70976

post #53186 of 70976

Arvo Pärt - Alina

 

 

 

I bought the sheet music for Für Alina yesterday and ordered one for the version of Spiegel im Spiegel for violin and piano. Pärt's music has always had a deep resonance with me and since I started learning to play the piano recently I'm really looking forward to learning to play these pieces myself and gaining even more insight into them. I just finished reading the Wikipedia article for Für Alina and I must say it was a truly interesting read. The piece's deceptively simple structure is fascinating. I also just read a quote from Pärt that really helped crystallize his tintinnabuli style for me and made me view it with fresh eyes and a deeper understanding: "One plus one, it is one – it is not two. This is the secret of this technique."

 

Watching YouTube videos of others performing Für Alina has helped me in figuring out how I want and don't want to play the piece. I very much enjoy the free tempo and the resulting more-than-encouraged, practically-demanded freedom of interpretation regarding various aspects of the performance. I can see myself playing this piece a thousand times over the years.

 

 

 

The first video isn't bad, but I don't think she quite "gets" the piece. She tries to play it right, but there is no "right" way to play it, so she gets it wrong.

 

The guy in the second video has a magical touch; that is immediately obvious. His phrasing is also much better for me than in the first video, but still not quite how I'd like to hear this piece played. Still, he obviously feels a connection to the music. I don't enjoy watching the video, though. His fingerwork seems too polished and feels distracting to me, somehow not quite fitting to this piece, in my humble opinion. Might seem like an odd thing to criticize, but perhaps some out there can share my sentiment.

 

Of the three videos, the woman's phrasing in the last one is closest to how I imagine in my head the piece should sound like. It does differ from it, but this woman's approach to the timing relation of the notes is very interesting. I'm not sure if it's the piano or her playing, but the music could sound a bit softer, although of these three performances she gets the closest to a serene quality for me, letting the notes resonate and hang, ringing like bells. Her playing might even be too sparse for me, causing some of the lingering notes to die out too much before moving to the next bar, but better that than not taking your time and feeling the rich tapestry of echoes reverberating seemingly all the way from the beginning of time.

post #53187 of 70976

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90

post #53188 of 70976

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90

 

Disclosure - Settle .  Not bad at all. some tracks are a bit too "Dance" for my tastes but overally I like this album.

 

post #53189 of 70976
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post
 

 

Arvo Pärt - Alina

 

 

 

I bought the sheet music for Für Alina yesterday and ordered one for the version of Spiegel im Spiegel for violin and piano. Pärt's music has always had a deep resonance with me and since I started learning to play the piano recently I'm really looking forward to learning to play these pieces myself and gaining even more insight into them. I just finished reading the Wikipedia article for Für Alina and I must say it was a truly interesting read. The piece's deceptively simple structure is fascinating. I also just read a quote from Pärt that really helped crystallize his tintinnabuli style for me and made me view it with fresh eyes and a deeper understanding: "One plus one, it is one – it is not two. This is the secret of this technique."

 

Watching YouTube videos of others performing Für Alina has helped me in figuring out how I want and don't want to play the piece. I very much enjoy the free tempo and the resulting more-than-encouraged, practically-demanded freedom of interpretation regarding various aspects of the performance. I can see myself playing this piece a thousand times over the years.

 

 

 

The first video isn't bad, but I don't think she quite "gets" the piece. She tries to play it right, but there is no "right" way to play it, so she gets it wrong.

 

The guy in the second video has a magical touch; that is immediately obvious. His phrasing is also much better for me than in the first video, but still not quite how I'd like to hear this piece played. Still, he obviously feels a connection to the music. I don't enjoy watching the video, though. His fingerwork seems too polished and feels distracting to me, somehow not quite fitting to this piece, in my humble opinion. Might seem like an odd thing to criticize, but perhaps some out there can share my sentiment.

 

Of the three videos, the woman's phrasing in the last one is closest to how I imagine in my head the piece should sound like. It does differ from it, but this woman's approach to the timing relation of the notes is very interesting. I'm not sure if it's the piano or her playing, but the music could sound a bit softer, although of these three performances she gets the closest to a serene quality for me, letting the notes resonate and hang, ringing like bells. Her playing might even be too sparse for me, causing some of the lingering notes to die out too much before moving to the next bar, but better that than not taking your time and feeling the rich tapestry of echoes reverberating seemingly all the way from the beginning of time.

Another great post - cheers. I also enjoyed the last video more it had a bit more atmosphere. I don't really know why I like it more, maybe because she pauses on some notes for longer and emphasizes them a bit more. Do you think that maybe the beautiful camera work had anything to do with it?  

 

The recording in the 3rd video also seems like it had some post production done like maybe added chorus and reverb. Adding reverb tends to add atmosphere but maybe that was just how the room sounded. The recording over all just seems a lot nicer - like they had really nice ambient mikes. Obviously the piece is played differently as well but i think the other things have a subconscious effect.  


Edited by magiccabbage - 6/25/14 at 6:52am
post #53190 of 70976
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

Another great post - cheers. I also enjoyed the last video more it had a bit more atmosphere. I don't really know why I like it more, maybe because she pauses on some notes for longer and emphasizes them a bit more. Do you think that maybe the beautiful camera work had anything to do with it?  

 

The recording in the 3rd video also seems like it had some post production done like maybe added chorus and reverb. Adding reverb tends to add atmosphere but maybe that was just how the room sounded. The recording over all just seems a lot nicer - like they had really nice ambient mikes. Obviously the piece is played differently as well but i think the other things have a subconscious effect.  

Yes, the longer intervals between groups of notes have a lot to do with it for me. As you said the piano is nicely captured as well; it comes closest in sound to the performances captured on the ECM disc, which are the composer's personally selected extended variation arcs from a several-hour-long recording done in Pärt's presence, consisting of variations and small adjustments to phrasing in search of the truest realisation of Pärt's tintinnabuli sound. Like you said about subconscious effects, the extended use of the sustain pedal throughout the piece apart from lifting it briefly before the last four bars adds a deeply effecting, almost surreal quality to the music. It is as if time gets extended and everything lingers in this singular moment. The markings in the score tell to listen to one's inner self, and I think that goes both for the performers and the listener.


Edited by TJ Elite - 6/25/14 at 8:52am
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