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post #39691 of 53968

Björk - Homogenic

 

 

Great album! Interesting read too: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homogenic

post #39692 of 53968
Quote:
Originally Posted by DLeeWebb View Post

"The Jazz Age" - The Bryan Ferry Orchestra

Your thoughts on this new release, Doug ?

post #39693 of 53968

Working at home today and cranking some tunes while the family is away.

 

Listening to Jucifer.

 

Jucifer's winning combination of gorgeous melodies and monster ROCK SOUND --Relapse Records

For Fans Of: WHITE STRIPES, SONIC YOUTH, SLEATER KINNEY, PJ HARVEY, LIGHTNING BOLT, MELVINS, ROYAL TRUX, MY BLOODY VALENTINE, 27, PARTY OF HELICOPTERS --Relapse Records

 

Product Details

 

Tombs-Path of Totality-heavy genre shape shifting band...think Neurosis, Unsane, with a little BM. Raw, bleak and really good.

 

Product Details

 

Alcest-more shape shifting-pretty sounding French BM post something or other....

 

Wolves in the Throne Room-nature inspired atmosphereic USBM post metalish....

 

Primordial-Irish pegan awseomeness!

 

41cw%2BMas-1L.jpg


Edited by markm1 - 2/21/13 at 10:28am
post #39694 of 53968
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saraguie View Post

Amazing when you think about it? No bass guitarist!

 

Yes!  It's barely noticeable with those three top notch musicians letting it rip.

 

 

 

Right now I'm listening to  

 

Hancock, Brecker and Hargrove - Directions In Music: Celebrating Miles Davis & John Coltrane

 

post #39695 of 53968
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hi-Finthen View Post

Your thoughts on this new release, Doug ?

 

I know you're asking Doug and not me, but I have listened to it a little. To me, it sounds very much old school "big band" jazz. It is not the jazz of the 1960s or something like that. It's more big band jazz from an earlier time, like maybe the 1940s. It reminds me of Benny Goodman or something like that. Even though it's new, it sounds like an old jazz record.

post #39696 of 53968
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_equalizer View Post

Right now I'm listening to  

 

Hancock, Brecker and Hargrove - Directions In Music: Celebrating Miles Davis & John Coltrane

 

 

Going to have to get my hands on a copy of that. Haven't heard it yet, but it looks good and I'm always interested in hearing what Hargrove is up to. Thanks!!!

post #39697 of 53968
Quote:
Originally Posted by StratocasterMan View Post

 

I know you're asking Doug and not me, but I have listened to it a little. To me, it sounds very much old school "big band" jazz. It is not the jazz of the 1960s or something like that. It's more big band jazz from an earlier time, like maybe the 1940s. It reminds me of Benny Goodman or something like that. Even though it's new, it sounds like an old jazz record.

Thanx StratMan as you were first to point it out to me as a new release a few days back. I do like Ferrys vocals and can easily imagine his lounge club vocals w old school jazz tunage ...

post #39698 of 53968
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hi-Finthen View Post

Thanx StratMan as you were first to point it out to me as a new release a few days back. I do like Ferrys vocals and can easily imagine his lounge club vocals w old school jazz tunage ...

 

No problem. I think it is an enjoyable record and worth a listen. I hope you will get a chance to hear it. I should warn you, however, that I don't think there are any vocals on the whole album. It is an instrumental-only record. It is very relaxing and will make you feel like you are back in the 1940s or something.

post #39699 of 53968

post #39700 of 53968

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 80

Loscil Coast/ Range/ Arc

Boris Split LP


Edited by MrQ - 2/21/13 at 12:26pm
post #39701 of 53968

1000

 

It's time to listen to one of my top ten albums again. I try to limit myself to only a few listens per year to avoid ruining the album for myself.

post #39702 of 53968

I love when I find a track I´ve been searching for some time. I kneewed the lyrics but it did not give any match at google. 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoO2ym0P-QA

 

Faze O - Breakin The Funk.

 

Oh man this is music !

 

Already listened to this about 30 times today :)


Edited by Velocity - 2/21/13 at 12:05pm
post #39703 of 53968

hmm -

Quote:
Originally Posted by StratocasterMan View Post

 

No problem. I think it is an enjoyable record and worth a listen. I hope you will get a chance to hear it. I should warn you, however, that I don't think there are any vocals on the whole album. It is an instrumental-only record. It is very relaxing and will make you feel like you are back in the 1940s or something.

Instrumental only, eh... :(

post #39704 of 53968

Primo!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Achmedisdead View Post

post #39705 of 53968
   

 
 

 

 

Dead Can Dance - Anastasis

In English, the Greek word "anastasis" is literally translated as "resurrection." The definition is apt as the title to Dead Can Dance's reunion offering, their first recording of new studio material since 1996's Spiritchaser. Lisa Gerrard and Brendan Perry established a well-deserved global reputation for pushing boundaries in popular music. Coming from the fringes of the gothic music world on the iconic 4AD label, they brought a sense of near classical discipline (and pretension) into their sound. They incorporated cutting-edge production techniques and also folded in -- mostly accurately -- several international musical traditions; combined, they created a deeply atmospheric, lushly textured, dramatic brand of post-gothic pop. Self-produced and released by PIAS, Anastasis features eight songs, and clocks in at just under an hour. The trace elements will be very familiar to DCD fans. In fact, Anastasis can be called, for the most apart, an album of tropes; it is much more a tour through much of the band's previous history than an exercise in delivering anything new.

This is surprising given Gerrard's vast soundtrack experience and Perry's solo albums, various collaborative contributions, and film work. The musical tenets here derive from near-Eastern Mediterranean sources (mainly Greek and Turkish folk forms), and some from the various nations of North Africa. Immediately noticeable is Perry's voice (which holds forth on the fine meta-mystical opener "Children of the Sun" and the hollowed-out bliss of "Opium"); it is deeper, richer, more restrained in its delivery, but more powerful because of it. He and Gerrard rarely sing on the same tune. For Gerrard, her instantly recognizable instrument shines forth on "Agape" and "Kiko," with their Arab-scaled strings, dumbeks, ouds, and cymbaloms. The set's finest moment is "Return of the She-King," whose drones, and the processional multi-tracked vocals by Gerrard, are matched by strings, deep tom-toms, swooping ethereal guitars, ouds, and numerous instruments. Perry joins in at the end, and their twin voices meet in a gauzy dexterity and contrast amid a swirl of neo-classical strings.

 

La Nef - Music for Joan the Mad

The daughter of King Ferdinand of Aragon and Queen Isabella of Castile and the mother of King Charles V, Joan the Mad (Juana la Loca in Spanish) was a Spanish queen who lived from 1479-1555. She is believed to have suffered from mental illness -- possibly, she experienced what is now called schizophrenia -- and was confined to the historic castle at Tordesillas. A fascinating CD, Music for Joan the Mad was inspired by the life of the Spanish queen, who was believed to be a major music lover. La Nef didn't claim that Music for Joan the Mad was an exact re-creation of Spanish music from the 15th and 16th centuries -- the Quebec-based ensemble takes its share of liberties. On this enriching CD (which contains Spanish and French lyrics), listeners will hear elements of both European/Catholic and Middle Eastern music. In fact, Music for Joan the Mad is full of what is known as "modal" or "scalar" playing -- Arabic, Jewish, Armenian, Greek, Indian, Turkish, and North African music are all modal-oriented, and in the 1960s, modality was embraced by such jazz innovators as John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Pharoah Sanders, and Yusef Lateef. This album takes us back to a time when a lot of European folk was greatly influenced by Jews and Arabs, both of whom were violently forced out of Spain in the name of Christianity. Music for Joan the Mad is an enriching gem that lovers of world music should make a point of obtaining.

 

Philip Pickett - The Pilgrimage to Santiago

The Pilgrimage to Santiago is the first of Philip Pickett and the New London Consort's forays into the mostly twelfth century songs associated with pilgrims to the shrine of St. James in Santiago de Compostela in Spain. For sources, Pickett reviewed a number of Spanish manuscripts, including the Codex Calixtinus, Las Huelgas, Cantigas de Santa Maria, and the Llibre Vermell, searching for songs that specifically mentioned Santiago de Compostela. There are accounts and iconography extant that portrays the pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela as a merrily music-making bunch, and Pickett considered such visual and documentary clues in shaping these interpretations. A former member of the Early Music Consort of London and Musica Reservata, Pickett is well informed in the challenges facing anyone inclined to interpret the Cantigas; they are all monophonic, and several consist of long, unwieldy texts divided into as many as 15 verses, if not more. Do you choose the best four or five verses and focus on those, or do all 15? Pickett utilizes both approaches, presenting somewhat condensed versions of certain Cantigas and, particularly in the case of "De grad'a Santa Maria," which runs nearly 20 minutes, going for the long version. As each verse is varied a little bit in some way, it never gets boring; in that particular piece, Pickett calls for a much larger complement of singers and instrumentalists than is usual for an early music group, in keeping with statuary he saw at Santiago Cathedral.

Other pieces are more modest in presentation, and in these settings, the voice of Pickett's collaborator Catherine Bott is key; the freshness and rhythmic brio of her singing helps focus the New London Consort in equal measure to Pickett's own direction. The Pilgrimage to Santiago remains one of the New London Consort's most extraordinary achievements and sets new standards for the performances of Cantigas.

 
Reviews edited from: allmusic.com :)

 

 

Edited by Urbex Girl - 2/21/13 at 9:33pm
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