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THE DIY HEADPHONE STAND THREAD - Page 3

post #31 of 3134
Yep, with the right tools I think most anyone here could make a nice wooden stand. If you can solder and do casework, then this stuff is isn't any harder. Definitely some nice stuff so far. I like 'em all!!
post #32 of 3134
Okay, I'm game. I'd like to try making something. Can someone explain how I would make something fairly simple? For example, say I wanted to do an inverted T shape (like the Stax stands) or the PVC pipe style as posted by fatcat28037, where would I start?

I can solder and work case metal, but know little about wood. What sort of thing should I buy, what sort of tools should I use? How do I take a square lump and turn it into a nicely rounded and shiny work of art like the amazing pics posted?
post #33 of 3134
Quote:
Originally Posted by mojo View Post
Okay, I'm game. I'd like to try making something. Can someone explain how I would make something fairly simple? For example, say I wanted to do an inverted T shape (like the Stax stands) or the PVC pipe style as posted by fatcat28037, where would I start?

I can solder and work case metal, but know little about wood. What sort of thing should I buy, what sort of tools should I use? How do I take a square lump and turn it into a nicely rounded and shiny work of art like the amazing pics posted?
Start small and work your way up. It's not as simple as some would like to have you believe. As has been said the right tools go a long way, and they don't come cheap.
It would be a shame to buy a beautiful piece of Burl only to mangle it beyond repair. Start out with some inexpensive wood, and try to get the feel of it that way. Popular woodworker magazines can be a good source of information.
Like anything practice is the only way to improve. I myself am hopeless with a soldering iron.
post #34 of 3134
Quote:
Originally Posted by swt61 View Post
Start small and work your way up. It's not as simple as some would like to have you believe. As has been said the right tools go a long way, and they don't come cheap.
It would be a shame to buy a beautiful piece of Burl only to mangle it beyond repair. Start out with some inexpensive wood, and try to get the feel of it that way. Popular woodworker magazines can be a good source of information.
Like anything practice is the only way to improve. I myself am hopeless with a soldering iron.
I popped down to the library and got a book on woodworking. I think making a headphone stand should not be too hard, and with your encouragement I think I will give it a go.

To start with, I will try to make the base. It should be about the easiest bit, since basically it's a rectangular block, cut to size and edges smoothed down by hand. I'll use some easy wood for the first attempt. Not sure what sort of finish to use at the moment.

Anyway, depending on how that goes, I suppose the next step is either to do another, slightly more complicated block for the actual stand part, or use PVC pipe. PVC pipe has the advantage of being easy to work with and easy to make a double 'phone stand with (just an off-the-shelf T junction), but wood looks nicer IMHO. The problem with wood is the depth you need to cut I think. I have hand saws and an electic jigsaw, but to get the kind of depth and accuracy I would need I'd need a bench saw I think. Not wanting to invest in one just for this project, I could either get the wood cut by a professional or just go with the PVC.

PS. sorry for hijacking this thread, I'll shut up now
post #35 of 3134
Quote:
Originally Posted by mojo View Post
I popped down to the library and got a book on woodworking. I think making a headphone stand should not be too hard, and with your encouragement I think I will give it a go.

To start with, I will try to make the base. It should be about the easiest bit, since basically it's a rectangular block, cut to size and edges smoothed down by hand. I'll use some easy wood for the first attempt. Not sure what sort of finish to use at the moment.

Anyway, depending on how that goes, I suppose the next step is either to do another, slightly more complicated block for the actual stand part, or use PVC pipe. PVC pipe has the advantage of being easy to work with and easy to make a double 'phone stand with (just an off-the-shelf T junction), but wood looks nicer IMHO. The problem with wood is the depth you need to cut I think. I have hand saws and an electic jigsaw, but to get the kind of depth and accuracy I would need I'd need a bench saw I think. Not wanting to invest in one just for this project, I could either get the wood cut by a professional or just go with the PVC.

PS. sorry for hijacking this thread, I'll shut up now
At this point my best advice would be to be patient, Rome wasn't built in a day. Start with 100 or 120 grit sandpaper, and once you have all the tool marks smoothed out move on to 220 grit. Take your time and sand it all nice and uniform. I then hit it with 320, but that's not absolutely necessary.
As for finish I like lacquer. I use an HVLP sprayer, but you can get fabulous results with Deft brand spray lacquer from Lowes and Home Depot. Don't spray too heavy of a coat. 5 light coats is far superior to 2 or 3 heavy ones. Let the lacquer dry for an hour or so between each coat. If you do get any runs, sand them down with 220 before recoating. Also buy some 0000 steel wool, and buff the piece down with that in between each coat. Make sure to either blow the piece off with compressed air or wipe it down good with a clean cloth, or better yet a tack cloth before applying the next coat. You'll end up with a nice satin finish as smooth as a babies butt, and durable too.

Good luck, and share your results with us.
post #36 of 3134
Quote:
Originally Posted by swt61 View Post
Start small and work your way up. It's not as simple as some would like to have you believe. As has been said the right tools go a long way, and they don't come cheap.
It would be a shame to buy a beautiful piece of Burl only to mangle it beyond repair. Start out with some inexpensive wood, and try to get the feel of it that way. Popular woodworker magazines can be a good source of information.
Like anything practice is the only way to improve. I myself am hopeless with a soldering iron.
All great advice from swt61!!

One good way to learn is to take a local woodworking class at a high school or college. Or find someone local who would be willing to show you.

Sorry if I made it sound simple, as it's not, but neither is casework or building amps IMO. Patience is paramount, and keep in mind just like in metalwork--whatever you remove from your project is gone in most cases.

Find yourself some basswood if you're using hand tools as it works easily and is inexpensive. Power tools will make easy work of harder stuff. A comment on power tools, it takes about 3 seconds to mess up 3 days worth of work, so keep that in mind and always check, recheck, and think ahead. I hate to admit how many projects I've destroyed with power tools
post #37 of 3134
Maaaann! YOU GUYS ARE GOOD!
post #38 of 3134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blooze View Post
it takes about 3 seconds to mess up 3 days worth of work,
So true, or worse yet those nice digits attached to your hand!
post #39 of 3134
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by swt61 View Post
So true, or worse yet those nice digits attached to your hand!
I've never done that in my woodshop, I perfere to use garden pruning shears. I know I know but I manager to do it somehow, just the side of the tip of my right ring finger.
post #40 of 3134
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatcat28037 View Post
I've never done that in my woodshop, I perfere to use garden pruning shears. I know I know but I manager to do it somehow, just the side of the tip of my right ring finger.
Funny how stuff happens with manual controlled tools as well. Took a guy to the ER one time that took all his fingers off and half his palm using a 3" bit in a table router. Not pretty.

SO BE CAREFUL USING TOOLS FOLKS!!
post #41 of 3134
I just started wood working last winter, but I have come a long way since then!

Back then I was making headphone stands that looked like this:







Since then I have added a few new woodworking techniques that have brought my finished products to a whole new level.

Making headphone stands was a great way to learn woodworking for myself, and also with my dad. I took the whole spring semester off due to schooling, however I had access to a huge library with a few monthly woodworking mags. That kept me busy!
I'm back at it again this summer working a brand new FUN design!
^_^

I'll have to take pictures of one sometime. Teaching my dad how to make them, and hopefully he will be able to start selling a few.

For those who are thinking of DIY woodworking, it's very easy to make a functional product that will serve its purpose. Might not look very professional right off the bat, but that's the way with anything.


~Drew
post #42 of 3134
Now in 1/2 glass with round corners, not scratches for the heapdhones....



post #43 of 3134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sovkiller View Post
Now in 1/2 glass with round corners, not scratches for the heapdhones....



This one are really really nice, seems hard to work in glass, nothing for everyone i guess...

Love it....

/Erik
post #44 of 3134
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerryKing View Post
This one are really really nice, seems hard to work in glass, nothing for everyone i guess...

Love it....

/Erik
CNC machines do wonders.... ....

BTW I'm planning to sell the prior one, no base and no Ultrasone logos, just the glass, if anybody is interested gimme a shout...it is heavy... 3/8 clear glass...
post #45 of 3134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sovkiller View Post
CNC machines do wonders.... ....
That is almost cheating

Just kidding
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