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The Canon Thread - Page 180

post #2686 of 2699

I know the older 24 was a dog (happy to sell it for the little bit I got for it), but the new 24 TS-E is amazing. Truly. I've not really seriously worked with the 45 though - did they do a V2 update on it as well? 

post #2687 of 2699
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post
 

I know the older 24 was a dog (happy to sell it for the little bit I got for it), but the new 24 TS-E is amazing. Truly. I've not really seriously worked with the 45 though - did they do a V2 update on it as well? 

The 24 TS-E mk2 is one of the sharpest lenses I've used. The glass is just top notch.

post #2688 of 2699
Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post
 

I know the older 24 was a dog (happy to sell it for the little bit I got for it), but the new 24 TS-E is amazing. Truly. I've not really seriously worked with the 45 though - did they do a V2 update on it as well? 

Only the 24 has gotten a V2 update. If I'm not mistaken, the 17 hasn't but doesn't need to as it is a very recent model. The 45 and 90 still remain their ancient, original selves.


Edited by MadCow - 12/14/14 at 6:55pm
post #2689 of 2699

@hyogen have you tried Nikon's legendary 135 f/2 DC? quite a few portrait photogs love that as an alternative to canon's :) Also having played with both 5D3 and D750 I'd switch to a D750 if i werent so heavily invested in Canon already!

post #2690 of 2699
Quote:
Originally Posted by raptor84 View Post

@hyogen
have you tried Nikon's legendary 135 f/2 DC? quite a few portrait photogs love that as an alternative to canon's smily_headphones1.gif Also having played with both 5D3 and D750 I'd switch to a D750 if i werent so heavily invested in Canon already!
The D750's grip is just so damn deep!

I like the grip, feels so damn comfy.
post #2691 of 2699
Quote:
Originally Posted by raptor84 View Post
 

@hyogen have you tried Nikon's legendary 135 f/2 DC? quite a few portrait photogs love that as an alternative to canon's :) Also having played with both 5D3 and D750 I'd switch to a D750 if i werent so heavily invested in Canon already!

 

Yes, I rented it once and it had really nice bokeh.  I wish they would update it with a newer lens with weather sealing at least.  I also hate to pay $1000+ for a used one when Canon's superior version can be had for like $750 used!  I found it to be quite long and I once found this very good comparison site between the 135 f/2 and 105 f/2 DC which look pretty much the same.  The bokeh was indistinguishable because you had to be closer to your subject to get the same FOV with the 105 as with the 135.  

 

For now I have the 105 f/2.8 VR macro lens and it comes in kinda handy for macro shots sometimes, but I find even 105 too long sometimes.. 135 would be even less useful to me in situations.  I see now why zooms are so useful for when you just don't have the time to switch between lenses.  Even carrying two bodies with different lenses like 35 and 85 I feel a little restricted at weddings because I want to get closer or wider but want to limit my movement as to not be distracting.  I also hate to get Nikon's 70-200 f/2.8 when it'll not be anywhere close to 200mm due to focus breathing--more like 160mm?  

 

Although I'm quite happy with the D750, I still wish I had Canon's skin tones and Canon lenses.  The super cheap and sharp 70-200 f/4L lens would even be super useful to me for weddings or receptions where I need flash anyway since I have to top down quite a bit to get the DOF I want..  I'll be posting on the Nikon thread some of my recent work with the D750 soon...I'll stop contaminating this thread with Nikon photos ;)

 

This is one thing I have noticed about the D750 that is a little annoying--I don't remember the issue being as pronounced on the D600..  When shooting in burst mode, sometimes it takes a full 2 seconds or so to be able to change my shutter speed or aperture...........NOT COOL!  I don't even think it is when my buffer has filled up...I think it happens only after about 5 shots on burst and I want to change a setting (I shoot in manual pretty much 100% of the time) It has happened to me on a few occasions now and I'm not sure if what I'm experiencing is normal.  I better test it out and send it back if my camera happens to be defective.  I don't even care about the 2 stuck pixels my screen has (OLED screens commonly have stuck pixels and it doesn't really bother me).   Could it be my memory card?  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MachBot View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by raptor84 View Post

@hyogen
have you tried Nikon's legendary 135 f/2 DC? quite a few portrait photogs love that as an alternative to canon's smily_headphones1.gif Also having played with both 5D3 and D750 I'd switch to a D750 if i werent so heavily invested in Canon already!
The D750's grip is just so damn deep!

I like the grip, feels so damn comfy.

 

Indeed, so much better than D600's grip.  I was worried about carpal tunnel after shooting for hours with heavy lens and flash.  I wish the grip were a tiny bit more full though--it is not as full and round as Canon's grip, but I'm satisfied with it.


Edited by hyogen - 12/16/14 at 11:28pm
post #2692 of 2699

Hmm did not expereince the shutter/aperature change lockout issue described during my short use.  Is there some wierd safety shift or buffer setting buried in the menus?

post #2693 of 2699

I'll report back.  Maybe I'm just mistaken or maybe it's my memory card issue.  I know recently I've had a really good Samsung PRO card and a cheaper Sony Class 10 SD card.  Maybe it's happening when one memory card fills up?  I know that it's happened at least a few times recently that my memory card would have been filled up and switched to the second slot..

 

 

 

I was really surprised/appalled to find out that changing ISO on the 5D mark 3 (and probably previous versions also) does not change the exposure meter in real time.  To see the change in the exposure meter when changing ISO, you have to re-meter by half pressing the shutter.....   I asked the sales guy at the camera shop who was a pro himself and he said that that's just the way it was and agreed that it was not as fast as Nikon bodies.  Nikon's dual wheel system for aperture and shutter speed and the live real-time exposure meter has made it so easy and fast for me to shoot in manual.  Is there something I'm missing or do you just get used to the way Canons are set up?  My only previous experience is with an old Rebel T1i which I was shooting in manual almost exclusively close to the time I upgraded to D600.  


Edited by hyogen - 12/16/14 at 11:40pm
post #2694 of 2699

I'm in A/v 90% of the time so I don't really feel it :) Plus I do mainly portraits so not that much fast fiddling needed for me. I've also gotten smitten by the Fuji X100s and Sony A7s HELP =p

post #2695 of 2699

so you have felt it before?  

 

EDIT:  Oh, you were talking about the live exposure meter.  


Edited by hyogen - 12/17/14 at 12:32am
post #2696 of 2699
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyogen View Post
 

I was really surprised/appalled to find out that changing ISO on the 5D mark 3 (and probably previous versions also) does not change the exposure meter in real time.  To see the change in the exposure meter when changing ISO, you have to re-meter by half pressing the shutter.....   I asked the sales guy at the camera shop who was a pro himself and he said that that's just the way it was and agreed that it was not as fast as Nikon bodies.  Nikon's dual wheel system for aperture and shutter speed and the live real-time exposure meter has made it so easy and fast for me to shoot in manual.  Is there something I'm missing or do you just get used to the way Canons are set up?  My only previous experience is with an old Rebel T1i which I was shooting in manual almost exclusively close to the time I upgraded to D600.  

 

On the 5D3, there are two common ways to change ISO. If press the ISO button on the top panel, you are essentially entering a different "mode". Like a separate menu system, here your only options are to change ISO or Exposure Compensation; the half-press is just to leave the present mode (and so happens to reactivate the exposure meter at the same time).

 

The other way to do it is to map ISO to the Set button, which I do and it is much faster and intuitive. Now you hold down the Set button and spin the top dial, and the exposure meter does change in real time.

post #2697 of 2699
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadCow View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyogen View Post
 

I was really surprised/appalled to find out that changing ISO on the 5D mark 3 (and probably previous versions also) does not change the exposure meter in real time.  To see the change in the exposure meter when changing ISO, you have to re-meter by half pressing the shutter.....   I asked the sales guy at the camera shop who was a pro himself and he said that that's just the way it was and agreed that it was not as fast as Nikon bodies.  Nikon's dual wheel system for aperture and shutter speed and the live real-time exposure meter has made it so easy and fast for me to shoot in manual.  Is there something I'm missing or do you just get used to the way Canons are set up?  My only previous experience is with an old Rebel T1i which I was shooting in manual almost exclusively close to the time I upgraded to D600.  

 

On the 5D3, there are two common ways to change ISO. If press the ISO button on the top panel, you are essentially entering a different "mode". Like a separate menu system, here your only options are to change ISO or Exposure Compensation; the half-press is just to leave the present mode (and so happens to reactivate the exposure meter at the same time).

 

The other way to do it is to map ISO to the Set button, which I do and it is much faster and intuitive. Now you hold down the Set button and spin the top dial, and the exposure meter does change in real time.

 

That's great to know.  When reviewing images can you instantly zoom in 1:1 on the focus point like you can with some Nikons (I know at least D750, D800, D810--i assume others)

post #2698 of 2699
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyogen View Post
 

 

That's great to know.  When reviewing images can you instantly zoom in 1:1 on the focus point like you can with some Nikons (I know at least D750, D800, D810--i assume others)


You can select the default magnification level (e.g. x2, x4, etc) when the magnify button is first pushed. However, the highest magnification level is mostly useless unless you're shooting JPG or RAW+JPG, because the image review is based on a JPG file and the embedded JPG in the RAW is not a full resolution image. Also I'm not really fond of magnifying so high -- usually I want to review at x4 first to get a more "overall view", only magnifying more if I really need to confirm critical focus. The Sony A7R magnifies to 1:1 and I really find it annoying, I always end up zooming back out to more comfortable levels in order to check overall focus.


Edited by MadCow - 12/17/14 at 6:22pm
post #2699 of 2699

I can see your point MadCow.  

 

I was able to figure out that i have to half press the shutter in order to start being able to change aperture and shutter speed after burst shooting.  I'm pretty sure I did not need to do this with the D600, but I think it is because on the D750 I have set the front/back scroll wheels to move back and forth and jump 10 photos at a time when reviewing photos.  After taking a photo I have the camera set to review the photo, so the camera thinks I'm trying to review photos instead of change settings.  

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