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The Canon Thread - Page 151

post #2251 of 2671
Quote:
Originally Posted by otherlives View Post

E-TTL (or whatever they call the communication system between the body and the canon flashes) has very limited range.  Its better to buy triggers that use radio signals.  Cactus V5's come to mind, 50 bucks used for a set.

 

I think you're mistaking the transmission method and the communications protocol. It is the optical transmission that has limited range (and possibly unreliable depending on obstacles and placement/facing of the flash); the communications protocol (E-TTL) has nothing to do with the range and most 3rd party radio transmitters act primarily as E-TTL passthrough devices to allow E-TTL communications via radio.

post #2252 of 2671
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadCow View Post

Quote: Originally Posted by otherlives  E-TTL (or whatever they call the communication system between the body and the canon flashes) has very limited range.  Its better to buy triggers that use radio signals.  Cactus V5's come to mind, 50 bucks used for a set.   I think you're mistaking the transmission method and the communications protocol. It is the optical transmission that has limited range (and possibly unreliable depending on obstacles and placement/facing of the flash); the communications protocol (E-TTL) has nothing to do with the range and most 3rd party radio transmitters act primarily as E-TTL passthrough devices to allow E-TTL communications via radio.

Vernacular was mistaken, my point was not. Unless something had changed in the past year most entry level transmitters do not communicate E-TTL. Very rarely will a photog that knows what hes doing shoot E-TTL off camera anyway.
post #2253 of 2671
Quote:
Originally Posted by otherlives View Post


Vernacular was mistaken, my point was not. Unless something had changed in the past year most entry level transmitters do not communicate E-TTL. Very rarely will a photog that knows what hes doing shoot E-TTL off camera anyway.

Well, I have tried my share of "entry level" wireless triggers, and until the recent launch of YongNuo YN-622, yes pretty much all of them stunk, with odd behaviors, "quirks", and just not working as they should.  YongNuo YN-622 is the first "affordable," or Chinese, triggers that truly seems to work flawlessly without issues, probably the most impressive off-brand photographic piece of equipment I have tried, period.  

 

As far as off camera E-TTL, sure it's nice to control everything manually IF one has the time, but with these new affordable E-TTL triggers available, more and more photogs are embracing them for things like wedding receptions where kids and people are running around, giving photogs no time to properly set up the lighting.  

post #2254 of 2671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon L View Post

Well, I have tried my share of "entry level" wireless triggers, and until the recent launch of YongNuo YN-622, yes pretty much all of them stunk, with odd behaviors, "quirks", and just not working as they should.  YongNuo YN-622 is the first "affordable," or Chinese, triggers that truly seems to work flawlessly without issues, probably the most impressive off-brand photographic piece of equipment I have tried, period.  

 

 

Their canon compatible speedlights are pretty impressive for the dosh too. Not a replacement for the big Canon speedlights (imo), but for second (or third or fourth) off camera strobes - they are a great option. 

post #2255 of 2671

a couple of my recent pics.  DAT exam over..  whew!  Now I have physics, bio, and biochem this quarter D: 

 


Edited by hyogen - 10/11/12 at 1:01am
post #2256 of 2671

post #2257 of 2671
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyogen View Post

 

 

 

 

 

Some nice shots, but why is this one upside down?

post #2258 of 2671

And the first one in the second post is sideways (and I think you rotated the last image in the first post but it still works) but, otherwise, much better!  My only comment would be to be careful tilting the camera.  To me, the perspective shift works in some of those images but not all.

post #2259 of 2671

Strong architectural elements can be tricky if you don't get the camera really squared up and level (or a really distinct deliberate tilt) anything that is *close* will just look like an error. 

post #2260 of 2671
Quote:
Originally Posted by leftnose View Post

And the first one in the second post is sideways (and I think you rotated the last image in the first post but it still works) but, otherwise, much better!  My only comment would be to be careful tilting the camera.  To me, the perspective shift works in some of those images but not all.

Thanks! I think I was trying to be a little too creative in some of these. Glad to hear it works for some of them. The last pic in the first post was the ceiling of a building. So I didn't rotate that one.. Perhaps could work better in a different perspective or portrait.

Quote:
Originally Posted by liamstrain View Post

Strong architectural elements can be tricky if you don't get the camera really squared up and level (or a really distinct deliberate tilt) anything that is *close* will just look like an error. 

Thanks for the feedback. Does anything look particularly distorted too much? Most were shot with the 10-20mm on a crop sensor.
Edited by hyogen - 10/11/12 at 5:38pm
post #2261 of 2671

here are a couple of my favorite pics I've taken so far.

 

This was shot wide open at 1.4 on the sigma 30mm.  I feel like I could have maybe stopped down a little bit to make it a little sharper.  or maybe manually set the ISO to 3200. It probably auto'd to 1600. I really like the colors of this one.  How's the white balance on this one? 




 

All the other photos aside from the first one was shot with Sigma 10-20mm.  If we had more time I would have switched to either the 30 or 50mm since there was quite a bit of space behind us.  I mainly stopped by this location to get a picture of the wall. 

 

This was a different day and a different location.  It's my wife's favorite.  Also shot with the 10-20--I regret that this one isn't as sharp as I'd like.


Edited by hyogen - 10/12/12 at 5:58pm
post #2262 of 2671

I played around with split toning for these.  All taken with my cheapest sigma 70-300 apo macro lens.  The first two I accidentally shot it at ISO 3200 in broad daylight. 



Edited by hyogen - 10/12/12 at 5:38pm
post #2263 of 2671
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyogen View Post

here are a couple of my favorite pics I've taken so far.

 

This was shot wide open at 1.4 on the sigma 30mm.  I feel like I could have maybe stopped down a little bit to make it a little sharper.  or maybe manually set the ISO to 3200. It probably auto'd to 1600. I really like the colors of this one.  How's the white balance on this one? 

 

 

 

Hope you dont mind the constructive criticism here, but what did you do in post?  This photo is *way* too red IMO.

post #2264 of 2671

ahh, thanks.  I feel this way too, now...  I think I was trying to bring out the magenta light too much from a previous picture and it affected this one, too.  I didn't really adjust them individually that much.  I think I upped the saturation level of magenta and a couple other colors like green also. 

 

Does this picture look overly soft?  I may have not focused perfectly, either...or mis-recomposed after using center dot focus. 
 

post #2265 of 2671
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyogen View Post

Does this picture look overly soft?  I may have not focused perfectly, either...or mis-recomposed after using center dot focus. 
 

 

Looks back focused to me.  The har at the back of her head looks OK but his beard looks soft.

 

You asked about white balance: you will never get a "proper" white balance in a shot like that because you have several different colors of light in the scene.  Take your pick and choose which you like best.  I think yours is too red but you say you split toned it so that's not really a WB issue.  But, in a case like this, if you really like the photo, don't forget B&W.  I know we spoke out against selective B&W but it can save a shot:

 

 

 

I also pulled highlights and bumped the contrast to get some detail back in the faces.  It probably still needs more contrast as there isn't really a good black in it but you get the idea.

 

To be honest, though, I much prefer your architecture shots to your people shots.  I think you might have too much emotional attachment to your subjects it's causing you trouble to truly edit properly.  This is difficult to overcome, though.

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