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Gun-Fi - Page 87

post #1291 of 1605

1911's aren't thick at all, they're thinner than anything with a double stack.  But honestly, with a good holster you can carry almost anything.  I have a matt delfatti holster for my HK USP Tactical 45, which is a giant gun, but it disappears in that holster.

 

post #1292 of 1605
Quote:
Originally Posted by Towert7 View Post





How can anyone carry a 1911 inside the waistband?  Even the small kimber carry 1911 seems very thick.

Easy.  With a proper belt and well designed IWB holster you can carry most pistols comfortably.  I carried a Commander sized 1911 for a number of years and it was very comfortable in a Milt Sparks Versa Max 2.  For the past several months, I converted to a full size Springfield XDM (45 ACP) in a Crossbreed Super Tuck.  Extremely comfortable even with the full size, double stack XDM.  Belt is also important.  These work very well:  http://www.thebeltman.net/

post #1293 of 1605

I've lived many years with the 1911, including my first Series 70 Govt Model, bought brand new in Killeen TX for about $225. (or something like that).

 

After that it was SIG, the 220ST and the 228. It takes determined training to perfect the DA to SA transition. 

 

When SIG went downhill, I moved on to Glock and never looked back. Started with the 17 and now I have 19s. I prefer the modern designs for their inherent reliability. 

 

 

post #1294 of 1605
I've been using the 1911 a bit more down here in the desert. I've come to like it, but the one thing that bothers me is decocking while loaded. I don't like having to pull the trigger and slowly letting down the hammer. I much prefer a decocking lever. But it's a fine gun, reliable and accurate. I'm not sure it's something I'd want to carry. In a tense situation, I might not let the hammer down as smoothly as it needed.

The gun I've been taking a liking to is the Sig P6 (P225) that was a former West German police gun. I bought it because I wanted to practice with cheaper 9mm ammo, but the thing has really won me over. Trigger pull is on the heavy side and it only holds eight rounds. But I love the ergos, it's damned reliable and very accurate. It has a good decocking lever, too. I have loads of confidence in it - this is the one I'd carry if I carried daily. Only thing is that I need to find some kind of good holster for it, and I'm not terribly up on who makes good ones.
post #1295 of 1605
thats because you're not supposed to carry it that way. Hammer down is more dangerous than safety on. I carried without one in the pipe. Just practice drawing and racking the slide as a single action.
post #1296 of 1605
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Erik View Post

I've been using the 1911 a bit more down here in the desert. I've come to like it, but the one thing that bothers me is decocking while loaded. I don't like having to pull the trigger and slowly letting down the hammer. I much prefer a decocking lever. But it's a fine gun, reliable and accurate. I'm not sure it's something I'd want to carry. In a tense situation, I might not let the hammer down as smoothly as it needed.

The gun I've been taking a liking to is the Sig P6 (P225) that was a former West German police gun. I bought it because I wanted to practice with cheaper 9mm ammo, but the thing has really won me over. Trigger pull is on the heavy side and it only holds eight rounds. But I love the ergos, it's damned reliable and very accurate. It has a good decocking lever, too. I have loads of confidence in it - this is the one I'd carry if I carried daily. Only thing is that I need to find some kind of good holster for it, and I'm not terribly up on who makes good ones.
 


That's why trained users of the 1911 all carry in condition 3--cocked and locked. If a shooter can't flip the safety on with a cocked hammer in a tense situation and feel absolutely secure, imo they are not adequately trained to carry a 1911.


Edited by pigmode - 7/2/11 at 12:56pm
post #1297 of 1605

Cocked and locked or carry something else.

 

You'd thinking sweeping the safety during the draw stroke wouldn't be that difficult. I did. But I've seen an astonishing  number of people in multiple hand gun classes absolutely flubber the safety - and never master it after  two days and a thousand rounds.  Imagine doing it under "real" stress if you have not honestly mastered it.

 

With a carry gun you are already behind the eight ball. You have to clear your garment to draw to begin with.  THAT ---clearing you shirt and a proper draw stroke--- is what everyone should be focused on who carries, not manipulating external safeties, and absolutely not working slides, and so forth.

 

 

 

 

post #1298 of 1605
Quote:
Originally Posted by wareagle69 View Post



Easy.  With a proper belt and well designed IWB holster you can carry most pistols comfortably.  I carried a Commander sized 1911 for a number of years and it was very comfortable in a Milt Sparks Versa Max 2.  For the past several months, I converted to a full size Springfield XDM (45 ACP) in a Crossbreed Super Tuck.  Extremely comfortable even with the full size, double stack XDM.  Belt is also important.  These work very well:  http://www.thebeltman.net/


KD holster makes a very nice IWB holster called the Defender. I used one with my XD 45 and with the XD40 SC. I currently use a Galco NSA which is also a great IWB holster for my Kimber.
 

 


 

post #1299 of 1605



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by grawk View Post

thats because you're not supposed to carry it that way. Hammer down is more dangerous than safety on. I carried without one in the pipe. Just practice drawing and racking the slide as a single action.


 Drawing and racking the slide too much work in a stressful situation. If you are uncomfortable carrying cocked and locked, check out a DA. Or better yet, do research on the 1911 design. It is a great gun and very safe to carry. I am embarrased to say that I have even tested my safety by accidentally dropping my Kimber while pulling up my pants in a stall. I carry IWB and the gun flipped over the top of my pants while pulling them up. The only noise it made was the unimpressive "thump" when $1200 hit the floor. On a side note, never attempt to catch a falling gun.

post #1300 of 1605

1803 Air Rifle -  Sorry if this has already been posted, but I found this video very interesting.  Who would have thought that an air rifle would have played such an important role in history.

 

http://www.network54.com/Forum/451309/thread/1296928404/This+is+just+to+cool+not+to+spread+around

 

post #1301 of 1605


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by archosman View Post

Here's a few of mine...


Old Smith&Wesson .38 Special... not mine



My first Ruger...


9MM Taurus. Had a lot of use!


Heckler & Koch USP-40. Got it when they first came out


Taurus 94 .22


Smith & Wesson 586 .357


U talkin' to me? Model 27 .357 8 3/8 inch barrel


Group shot of Revolvers


Whole family


 

WOW!

Gotta love your Ruger 22/45 Mark II so much better than the Mark III since it doesn't have that magazine disconnect that really blows. :))


Edited by BigBird - 7/12/11 at 3:22pm
post #1302 of 1605
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigBird View Post


 


 

WOW!

Gotta love your Ruger 22/45 Mark II so much better than the Mark III since it doesn't have that magazine disconnect that really blows. :))


Just to be technical, it's the ruger mk II, not the ruger 22/45 mark II (that is a totally different gun you are referring to).

 

The little 22's are not going to be used for self defense.  They are for fun and practice.  The magazine disconnect is a safety measure, which is useful for people who are just starting out and need to get familiar with guns.  If this were an EDC firearm, then that would be a whole different story.  

 

post #1303 of 1605


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Towert7 View Post




Just to be technical, it's the ruger mk II, not the ruger 22/45 mark II (that is a totally different gun you are referring to).

 

The little 22's are not going to be used for self defense.  They are for fun and practice.  The magazine disconnect is a safety measure, which is useful for people who are just starting out and need to get familiar with guns.  If this were an EDC firearm, then that would be a whole different story.  

 

What is the difference between the 22/45 and the MKII,isn't it the same pistol.  Can you please tell me whats difference I thought they were both the same guns. :/

 

post #1304 of 1605

I own too many to mention. 

post #1305 of 1605
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigBird View Post


 

What is the difference between the 22/45 and the MKII,isn't it the same pistol.  Can you please tell me whats difference I thought they were both the same guns. :/

 



 

The main difference is the grip is reshaped to replicate the 1911. The original purpose was to provide 2700 bullseye shooters with common pistol ergonomics, being that the 1911 is the predominant platform for centerfire. High Standard was probably the first to market this concept, in their target rimfires.

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