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How Do You Label Your CD-R Disks? - Page 2

post #16 of 39
If you are getting cut outs it may be your player and not your disc.
post #17 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmk005 View Post
My marker has been a sharpie. I take good care of my music too! The symptoms I am observing is actual music drop outs. The disks in question have no visible scratches so assume it is the ink.

Maybe just switching to these?:
Thanks for the link, I will be on the lookout as well.
post #18 of 39
Been using sharpies for years.
post #19 of 39
I use the closest sharpie to mark mine, but I always use CD-Rs that have a matte label printed over the lacquer.
post #20 of 39
interesting thread.
Personally, I use branded CDs, (TDK, $ony) because I felt safer with a known brand.

I mark them with a black sharpie, didn't notice any sound quality difference though. But I did realized that the car's audio player ruins the CD pretty fast
post #21 of 39
Thread Starter 

What about this?

Anyone have an opinion on/use this?
post #22 of 39
Why not use printable cd-r's in the first place?

I have a Canon inkjet printer which is able to print directly onto the surface of the blank disc.

The result is often VERY good looking. And i use it for simple text (like one would do with a marker), but also for full graphics as well. It looks much better than a label sticker or LightScribe (which i also have. and besides it's MUCH faster than lightscribe....), and is much better for your cd drives as well.

Because if you don't stick the label absolutely in the middle, it creates an inbalance when the disc is spinning, which can destroy your drive in the long run.

There are even glossy blanks, which can really look like bought cds

PS: since you asked for links, here's one to the cheapest Canon printer which is able to print on blanks, the IP4300
It also has a duplex unit (can print on both sides of the paper autmatically)
post #23 of 39
A friend of mine has a collection (audio, video, and . . . other things) that has put him into the 10K+ CD/DVD Territory. I've adopted his system:

1. Each DVD/CD gets a squential number. Any other information on the CD itself is considered extraneous.
2. After burning the CD/DVD, he simply does a dir/ls dump into a text file named by the label, i.e. 010001.txt for CD#10001 or 000031.txt for CD#31.
3. He uses windows to do a text search on the directory where he stores all the filedumps.

Really once you get into the 1K or 10K+ territory you need a semi-automated system and I've been looking but haven't really found a better one.

EDIT : Wow maybe I should read the op! For a semi-reliastic answer I've always used those fancy "CD-R" markets, which I believe are simply water-based instead of alcohol-based permanent ink. If you're actuially looking to print on you CD/DVD's and want a non-thermal non-stample-esque solution there are inkjets out there that are pretty cheap and do a good job. I've never had a problem with stamper solutions personally but I know many avoid them for reasons stated above.
post #24 of 39
I like using the ultra fine point Sharpie. A little worried about the seepage mentioned here now, although I haven't had any problems with old reading old backup CD-Rs so far.
post #25 of 39
Quote:
My marker has been a sharpie. I take good care of my music too! The symptoms I am observing is actual music drop outs. The disks in question have no visible scratches so assume it is the ink.
It's not the ink. CD-Rs simply degrade over time, sometimes shockingly fast, especially on cheap ones. It's the breakdown of the dye that's causing your problems, not the ink on the topside.
post #26 of 39
We use sharpies for temporary discs and we use an inkjet printer for color labels sent to our clients. Got a little robot and everything (This is for data CD, not audio.)
post #27 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowmagnet View Post
We use sharpies for temporary discs and we use an inkjet printer for color labels sent to our clients. Got a little robot and everything (This is for data CD, not audio.)
Which one? Links are very useful for thread readers.
post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmk005 View Post
Which one? Links are very useful for thread readers.
We use copypro gear. Ours is an older minimax, I think.

Those systems are great for mass reading CDs too. I'd love to have one for my trips to the used music store.
post #29 of 39
Sharpie - and I have never had a problem.
-
The audiophile side of me says that if I write neater and in cursive the discs sound better.
If I can get my wife to use her fancy caligraphic pen and make fancy swirls, it takes them to a whole new level.
post #30 of 39
I use pigment ink pen.
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