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Where can I buy liquid nitrogen and mercury? - Page 3

post #31 of 59
Well, I'm talking about pure mercury. "Hg".

Which you CAN drink without getting hurt at all.

The danger comes when mercury has lied somewhere for a period of time. Then bacteria will start to gather around it and it will become dangerous.

For example, somewhere in Denmark some medical company dropped a lot of mercury in a lake. The mercury infected frogs and fish in the lake, and it was traced in birds and wildlife around the lake. Sure, the birds and fish suffered, but for this to affect the people living around the lake they would have to exclusively eat fish from the lake.

Sorry I can't be more specific, I can only pass on what my teacher has tought me.
post #32 of 59
Quote:
what's the big deal. My dad said that when he was a kid in Poland, they used to break open thermometers and play with the mercury - carry it in their pockets, roll it around on a table, etc..
Myself and several friends played with a blob of it a couple of times as kids as well. Fortunately, even way back then, before the word polution was in common use and when your Doctor smoked a cigarette while examining you, we were aware mercury was poisonous and that it shouldn't be put in our mouths. We did roll it around in our hands and on a table for a while however. I'm glad now it was for a very short period of time.

Although moderately mad, 40 years later I still haven't grown any extra appendiges, but who knows what damage it did do?

Flasken: you might want to quiz your teacher about that again, as condoning the ingestion of a well known hazardous material without being 10,000% certain it's a fact, is not a good idea.

Nothing I've ever read about mercury has ever indicated such a thing.
post #33 of 59
Dude, I hate to say this, but you are wrong.

Mercury does really bad things to your nervous system. Rolling it around on your hand isn't that big a deal, but consuming it (weather directly or in fish/other animals) is very bad for you. Even worse is inhaling the vapor.

The reason why it may not seem as dangerous as, say, drinking bleach is because in small doses it does subtle things. Personality changes, cordination is affected, and as doses increase or if the source doesn't go away (mercury stays in your body) it eventually leads to insanity and death. Ever heard about hatters going mad? They rubbed the felt with mercury and got continuously exposed to the stuff.
post #34 of 59
Well, in that case, professor Whamsler told my entire class that something extremely toxic isn't that toxic at all.

I sure as hell am not going to drink the stuff, and I hope you don't consider my posts as encouragement for you to do it.
post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally posted by chillysalsa
what's the big deal. My dad said that when he was a kid in Poland, they used to break open thermometers and play with the mercury - carry it in their pockets, roll it around on a table, etc.. (What can I say, toys were expensive then, kids had to make due with stuff around)

Well, he turned out fine, and look at me - that 3rd arm has come in handy.
Poland? That's where my family's from(I was born there too)! I'll have to ask my dad. . .
post #36 of 59
Flasken, you're professor wasn't totally correct or totally wrong. Ingestion of mercury doesn't necessarily = bad news. But, if he's going to make a general statement, better be a qualified statement.

FYI: Look up the term, "Minamata" and "mercury". Find out what happens to large amounts of mercury that gets deposited into the environment. WAAAYYY BAAADDDD!!! Lots of children born with birth defects from mercury contamination in the local water that made it's way into people via fish. Pregnant moms ate the fish and some children developed serious birth defects as a result of the mercury contamination.

RE: Eating mercury
As with all things, the dose (and the form and the route of exposure) makes the poison. If you eat the contents of an oral mercury thermometer, you won't develop any symptoms at all. This type of exposure used to happen every single day in this country to small children and no one suffered any ill effects. The amount of elemental mercury in a oral thermometer is teeeeeny! It's only ~ 0.2-0.3 ml. And, this form of mercury (elemental) is poorly absorbed from the GI tract. So, what really happens is, you poop out the vast majority of the ingested amount.

If you do SHOTS (several mls to ounces) of mercury, that's when it can get trapped in your appendix. If that happens, you CAN get large amounts of mercury absorbed through volatilization and from organification from microorganisms. Either way, you can end up with a large amount of mercury absorbed into your body. Once it's in there, you're pretty well screwed. There are drugs to help increase the elimination rate of the mercury, but they don't work well.

Bruce
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally posted by Flasken
Well, in that case, professor Whamsler told my entire class that something extremely toxic isn't that toxic at all.

I sure as hell am not going to drink the stuff, and I hope you don't consider my posts as encouragement for you to do it.
Yes, yes he did!
post #38 of 59
Apparently pure Hg isn't harmful for you. It's the organic compounds that form when mercury is incorporated into other organisms that harm you when you eat them. I think it's called biomagnification.

Apparently in the 1800s pure Hg was used like laxitive it flushed your whole system out after drinking a glass.
post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally posted by Flasken


people, mercury is not that dangerous at all!

It's a total myth that makes no sense at all..

You can even DRINK liquid mercury without getting harmed. It is a very stable substans, almost as stable as gold or platinum. If you drink it, it will end up in the appendix and since it can't make any chemical reactions it will simple be expelled along with the rest of your poo.
You are drunk again aren't you?
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally posted by Flasken
Well, in that case, professor Whamsler told my entire class that something extremely toxic isn't that toxic at all.

I sure as hell am not going to drink the stuff, and I hope you don't consider my posts as encouragement for you to do it.
What you do:
1)Buy in bulk(50+) mercury thermometers.
2)Buy 1 shot glass.
3)Empty thermometers into shot glass(carefully, use rubber gloves).
4)Tell him to eat his words.

Any fscktard that tells his STUDENTS, whose welfare society entrusts him with, that eating mercury is safe deserves to be shot.


From the department of health:
Quote:
Mercury

Mercury is found naturally in the environment in several forms. In its elemental form, mercury is a shiny, silver-white, liquid metal. It can be combined with other chemicals to form inorganic compounds. Mercury can evaporate to form colorless, odorless mercury vapors. Mercury can combine with organic substances to form organic compounds such as methyl mercury.

Use of mercury

Mercury is used as electrode in industrial production of chlorine, manufacture of fungicides, anti-fouling paints, laboratory apparatus, thermometers, detonators, dental amalgams and batteries.

Absorption, metabolism and excretion

Elementary mercury is absorbed after the inhalation of mercury vapour. Ingested elemental mercury is poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. Soluble mercurial salts and aryl mercury compounds are also absorbed after inhalation and to a limited extent after ingestion. Mercury compounds may also be absorbed through the skin.

Mercury inhibits the action of enzymes containing -SH groups. Inorganic mercury is distributed almost equally between the red blood cells and the plasma, but alkyl compounds are concentrated in the red cells. The mercury absorbed into the body is distributed to many tissues, primarily the CNS and the kidney. Both organic and elemental mercury compounds readily cross the blood-brain barrier and the placenta and are excreted in breast milk. Mercury compounds are eliminated gradually in the urine, faeces, saliva and sweat. The average half-life in human is about 60 days for inorganic mercury and around 70 days for organic mercury compounds.

Signs and symptoms of mercury poisoning

Acute poisoning commonly results from inhalation of elemental mercury vapor, or from deliberate or accidental ingestion of mercury or its salts. Owing to their corrosive nature, ingestion of mercury and its compounds can cause pain, inflammation and necrosis of the oropharyngeal mucosa, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and renal damage with lesions of the proximal tubule and glomerulus. Severe cases may have acute papillary necrosis or chemical colitis with shock, edema, tremor, and ataxia. Chemical pneumonitis with cough, dyspnoea, retrosternal pain, basal late inspiratory crackles and patchy shadowing on CXR may follow copious inhalation. There may be pulmonary edema and blood stained sputum.

Chronic exposure to mercury salts can result in central nervous system toxicity, including personality changes, nervousness, irritability, fatigue, deterioration in memory, difficulty in concentration, insomnia, hearing loss, constriction of visual field, and a metallic taste. Tremors often have an intentional component which may impair fine and complex movements. Peripheral neuropathy (predominantly sensory) is more common in those with organic mercury poisoning. Gingivitis, stomatitis and excessive salivation may be early signs. The most common renal effect is tubular damage, with necrosis being more common in inorganic than organic poisoning. Glomerular damage may lead to albumunuria. Inorganic poisoning may occasionally result in nephrotic syndrome.

In children, mercury poisoning can result in the syndrome of acrodynia, which is characterized by severe leg cramps, irritability, paresthesia, excessive perspiration, pruritus, and painful redness and peeling of the palms of the hands and soles of the feet.

Laboratory diagnosis

Laboratory evaluation of mercury poisoning should include a complete blood count, serum electrolytes, liver and renal function tests, and urinalysis. Urine and blood mercury levels are used to detect exposure. For organic mercury, whole blood is the preferred medium since it is concentrated in the red blood cells. For inorganic mercury, blood is considered useful if samples are taken following recent exposure owing to its short half-life (2-4 days). In contrast, urinary mercury peaks approximately 2-3 weeks after exposure to inorganic mercury and decreases at a much slower rate with half-life of 40-60 days for short-term exposures and 90 days for long-term exposures. Therefore, urine is a more appropriate indicator for longer exposures than blood samples. Urinary mercury is normally less than 10 ug/l (50 nmol/l). Signs and symptoms of mercury poisoning may develop above 20 ug/l (100 nmol/l).

Treatment

Acute mercury poisoning by ingestion of mercuric salts can be treated by induced emesis or gastric lavage. Effective chelating agents for mercury include dimercaprol (e.g., 24 mg/kg per day in divided dose, given in 5-day courses separated by several days of rest) and N-acetyl penicillamine (e.g., 30mg/kg per day in divided doses). However, use of dimercaprol is contraindicated in acute poisoning with organic mercury compounds because this may enhance passage of mercury across the blood-brain barrier. Newer agents include DMPS and DMSA which have a lower side effect profile. DMSA is administered in doses of 10mg/kg 3 times daily for 5 days, then twice daily for another 14 days. Monitoring of clinical status and blood and urine mercury excretion is used to guide repeat dosing.

Therapy for chronic mercury poisoning depends on the severity of the symptoms, and whether evidence of neurologic or renal toxicity is present.
On organic(methyl) vs inorganic(elemental):
Methyl mercury is much more lipid-soluble than elemental mercury(which isn't absorbed well by the intestines, and most passes out w/ feces). It does things like move around your body freely, embedded in cell walls(cell membranes are mostly lipids), cross over into the brain(composed mostly of lipids) and testicles/ovaries(again, mostly lipids). Once in, say, the brain, mercury has a biological half life(half of it is out of your system in) of decades.

Eating inorganic mercury, your body absorbs maybe a tenth of a percent, and expels the rest w/ feces. With organic mercury, it absorbs nearly all of it.

I've got a mercury("quicksilver") plastic maze that I played w/ when I was little. I got to find a place to throw it away. The few mililiters that are in it are supposedly enough to poison a small lake to unsafe levels(meaning unsafe to drink, but mainly to eat anything out of).
post #41 of 59
Flasken, what do you have to say for yourself?
post #42 of 59
i think that the real danger from playing with pure mercury doesn't come from the contact with it. instead it comes from the fact that when it touches things, trace amounts are left behind. the trace amounts then evaporate and are breathed in where they are readily absorbed by the body. the bits that aren't absorbed in the lungs remain there and cause other problems.

as for liquid N2, i think that you can get it fairly easily. you can carry it around in a regular thermos for awhile, it will just evaporate faster than if you leave it in a dewar.

why would you want to try to use mercury for a super conductor anyway? there are lots of safe and relatively comon materials that can be used. even some solder mixes go superconducting. its been awhile since i worked with super conductors so i don't remember the exact alloy but its really not that hard to find stuff.
post #43 of 59
Quote:
Originally posted by andrzejpw
Poland? That's where my family's from(I was born there too)! I'll have to ask my dad. . .
Yeah, I could tell, Andrzej. I was born in Rybnik, that's in Ślask. Ask your dad if he ever played with the ol' stick + hoop.

Quote:
Originally posted by puck
there are lots of safe and relatively comon materials that can be used. even some solder mixes go superconducting.
As a general rule, most metals that are BAD conductors at room temp., may become superconductors at liq. helium temps, 4ºK.
I believe there are very few materials that go super-c at 77ºK - mostly ceramics with very non-symetrical crystal structures, and oxygen atoms in the lattice. I've just started a course on electronic materials, so I'm not that sharp on it yet - that link on pg. 1 of this thread is a good reference though...
post #44 of 59
This post reminds me of my High School Chemisty room. This place had just bout evertying. In the 1970s like 8 schools were consolidated into one new building. Every chemical from all those old schools got sent there...most ignored. Some of it had to date back to the 40s or even earlier. My teacher at the time was downright afraid to handle some of it. Arsinic Compunds, and enough other toxic junk in decaying containers to Kill half the town I lived in was in the back of that room.. The year after I gradguated the state came in and cleaned it out. The came in waring chemical masks and bringing crap out stuff in strange containers.
post #45 of 59
Quote:
Originally posted by HD-5000
Flasken, what do you have to say for yourself?
relax man, people have to sleep you know...

And I already explained that what I said was told to me by my teacher.

Quote:
Originally posted by KR...
You are drunk again aren't you?
Since you can't seriously think that that is still funny (it's been a year) I am forced to consider it an insult. Am I wrong?
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