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teen audiophile moral issues - Page 2

post #16 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by srozzman View Post
hmm... you could hit em with a 2 x 4 till they let you get an imod, or you could try to talk it over with them. prove that you're worthy of it. would they rather have that money spent on an imod, or something illegal, like weed?
Er, that's a horrible way of explaining it to your parents.

"Hey mom! I'm going to buy an iMod."

"That's a complete waste of money son. Don't even think about it!"

"Fine then! I'm going to buy $500 worth of crack instead."

... Definitely not the best way to go about this situation.
post #17 of 105
I'm mostly in agreement with your parents. Spending such a high percentage of one's income/savings on something for which one will get such a small added benefit is not sound fiscal policy, in general

--Chris
post #18 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by mulveling View Post
It's probably a good time to start honing your ninja/stealth skills too
If SK138 can hide it from his wife, you can hide it from your parents. Am I allowed to corrupt youth here?
post #19 of 105
First, I'd respect the wishes of your parents. No one knows the financial situation of your family like they do. Trust their judgement. At the end of the day, they're the ones you can truly count on to ALWAYS be there and steer you in the right direction despite what others may tell you.

Second, if this is really important to you, perhaps you could speak with them about the possibility of getting some after school work or maybe do some things around the house for some hobby money? The key is to be upfront and straight with them from the get go. If you're honest, respectful and sincere in the approach, I doubt your folks would say no. It certainly would be a sign of maturity which I think they'd respect.

Finally, even when you get off on your own, one very important lesson will be self restraint. Spur of the moment purchases and quick, ill thought out financial decisions can really get you into trouble. Best advice I got from my pops is forget the credit cards except for emergencies. Pay as you go. If you ain't got the $$ on you, you don't need to make that purchase. Good advice especially for young buyers like yourself.

Good luck and remember...your folks are on your side and only want what's best for you. Trust them. You may not like it or understand now, but it's the best thing to do.
post #20 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenW View Post
First, I'd respect the wishes of your parents. No one knows the financial situation of your family like they do. Trust their judgement. At the end of the day, they're the ones you can truly count on to ALWAYS be there and steer you in the right direction despite what others may tell you.

Second, if this is really important to you, perhaps you could speak with them about the possibility of getting some after school work or maybe do some things around the house for some hobby money? The key is to be upfront and straight with them from the get go. If you're honest, respectful and sincere in the approach, I doubt your folks would say no. It certainly would be a sign of maturity which I think they'd respect.

Finally, even when you get off on your own, one very important lesson will be self restraint. Spur of the moment purchases and quick, ill thought out financial decisions can really get you into trouble. Best advice I got from my pops is forget the credit cards except for emergencies. Pay as you go. If you ain't got the $$ on you, you don't need to make that purchase. Good advice especially for young buyers like yourself.

Good luck and remember...your folks are on your side and only want what's best for you. Trust them. You may not like it or understand now, but it's the best thing to do.
Ken, while your own parents may be have been very reasonable and generally great parents, I've known certain parents that are not so. They try to completely control how their kids spend money, even if the kid earned it themselves, that is, if they allow the kid to work at all. They make all the important decisions for the kid. They also lock their kids in the house and don't allow friends to enter the house. There's more, but I won't mention them because it will create too heated a debate here. My point is, if your parents are not being reasonable, you will just have to learn to be sneaky. Not all parents will always know what is best for you.
post #21 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by cotdt View Post
Not all parents will always know what is best for you.
This is true, but sneaking past should only be used as a last resort. Certainly getting caught again would be even worse than the first time. Teaching your parents that you are responsible (getting a job, budgeting, etc.) and then getting proper permission goes a long way with absolutely no side affects. You've gotta try before doing anything drastic.
post #22 of 105
be thankful to your parents that you didn't waste your money on junk. now start saving for the good stuff
post #23 of 105
Not being able to but high end audio gear shouldn't be at the top of your list.
post #24 of 105
Tbh I think your parents have a fair point. Maybe you should try and compromise, explain to them that this is your hobby, it's what you enjoy, and it's going to require some money spent on it.
Try and get them to let you spend money on some lower-priced stuff first. Don't bother with an amp (keep things simple, so you don't have to explain as much).

Edit: And don't spend all of your money. I like to have at least £200 in reserve in case I need an emergency buy.
post #25 of 105
Science and evolution is Fact!

Faith and the wonderfull fictional book isnt.

your ears are gonna last longer than interst in some novel.

get the imod silly old farts should get one as well.
GL, HF (tup)
post #26 of 105
Thread Starter 
thanks guys. dont worry im not actually silly with money. my parents where scared, because they dont understand the internet. They also dont trust a one man business.

i may just get sfp5's for now, 2nd hand of course (becuase i am sensible with money). it was NOT an impulse buy, i saved up birthday and christmas money for years to get this amount, to spend it on something i really like. I am the best money saver ever. i recently paid in £60 in copper and silver! saved up from when i was about 8.

also, i have an awesome techics sepaker amp... model: su-x955. how do you think this would fare as a headphone amp for now???

i worked out i would still have 400 in bank after all purchase / sellings. so in effect, a super system for just over 250, including 2nd hand tomahawk and 2nd had sfp5's.
post #27 of 105
I think that the super.fi's would be a good idea if you can get away with it. worry about amp/imod later.
post #28 of 105
ignore these ignant plebs. go around the "rules" get the mod..
no more excuses or confiding with the hear no see no speak no rubbish.
post #29 of 105
Some advice here, explain to your parents that things like this, and basicly hi-fi in general, have very high resale value. If you ever need the money or decide its not worth it, you can get 75-90% of it back.
post #30 of 105
Actually, my first internet purchase was for my 15 years old birth day gift that I bought for me self

I think for a lot of parents out there. The problem is not with spending money on goods. The biggest problem is that they have no trust, no faith in any internet/online shop. As far as they know, internet auction or online shop is all about scam and being scam. (well, at least my parents and most of my friends' parents are like that.)

Well, long story short, after several internet purchase. My parents finally begin to trust into online auction or online store. maybe that's the same situation to your parents.
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