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Terrible Blu-ray and HD-DVD sales - Page 4

post #46 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by socrates63 View Post
Do you think p*rn will play a factor as it did with VHS adoption over Betamax, and later with other media formats? If I understand correctly, Sony is preventing p*rn from being pressed on BluRay while the HD-DVD camp has welcomed the industry. So far, it doesn't seem to have had any effect.
There is a closed thread on this subject, do a search. The rumours are wrong.

Quote:
While we should note that the VideoScan numbers are not all-inclusive (for example, they don't include discs sold at Wal-Mart or some online merchants), the lower sales numbers at the bottom end of weekly list and on display elsewhere in the report (where some titles are listed as selling fewer than 200 units since inception) are certainly still a sobering reminder that both formats still have a long way to go in their shared quest to supplant standard-def DVD.
Overall numbers are going to be low if they do not include Walmart and some online retailers.
Quote:
blu-ray and HD DVD will definitly be adopted more slowly then dvd was, no doubt about it
DVD was not tied into a a popular gaming platform, so the only people that adopted it at first were people that bought it specifically for movies. In the case of BD, they are in position to do well based on the fact that the format is included in the PS3. This will hurt the PS3s total number of sales because of price when compared with the Wii/360, but it is great for the BluRay camp. Anyone that owns a PS3 and HDTV will eventually buy or at least rent a BD movie. Netflix charges the exact same fee for BD as it does for DVD, so this really makes it desirable for renting..

HD-DVD on the other hand, will probably continue to drop prices to compete with BD, so the race is far from over. However, they have some work to do to compete with the number of BD players (including the PS3) in people's homes.
post #47 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mercuttio View Post
Not nearly as much as it once did. It's too easy to find on the internet... remember that VHS was the only way to get naughty video in your own home. Hell, now you can get it on your cell phone in some countries.
That's a very good point. So much for an edge going to the HD-DVD camp.
post #48 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicomte View Post
Prices, availablility, and whatnot aside, the picture quality isn't so much better to justify the change. HDTV is much better than SDTV, but Blu-Ray and HDDVD aren't that much better than DVD, when played on a decent player with an HDTV set.
Not with what I've seen. Early Blu-Ray perhaps, because they botched up the first releases.

But HD-DVD, has look fantastic from the get go.

I bought an HD-DVD drive for my XBox 360, and given that I already had an XBox 360 and I got the drive for sale for $160, it was a no-brainer for me.

People can sit on the fence all they want, but I picked one, because it was easy. And I buy only those movies that I must have. I love the Matrix Trilogy, so I preordered that one. Also, the Planet Earth series is amazing, so that one is on order as well.

I upgraded a few that were already in my DVD collection. Like Mummy Returns, The Thing, and 12 Monkeys. And believe me, between my upsampling DVI outputted HTPC DVD player and HD-DVD, there is no contest, HD-DVD looks better in every way.

Also, I've noticed that the lossless compression for the audio makes an improvement there, even for my modest home theater set up. Quie an improvement over Dolby Digital (less so for DTS.)

You guys can sit on the fence all you want. I'll continue to enjoy my Hi Def movies. And even though both formats may die, it's not like they will send a goon squad over to my place and demand the movies I paid for to be returned. I can still enjoy them in my home afterwards.

-Ed
post #49 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edwood View Post
Not with what I've seen. Early Blu-Ray perhaps, because they botched up the first releases.

But HD-DVD, has look fantastic from the get go.

I bought an HD-DVD drive for my XBox 360, and given that I already had an XBox 360 and I got the drive for sale for $160, it was a no-brainer for me.

People can sit on the fence all they want, but I picked one, because it was easy. And I buy only those movies that I must have. I love the Matrix Trilogy, so I preordered that one. Also, the Planet Earth series is amazing, so that one is on order as well.

I upgraded a few that were already in my DVD collection. Like Mummy Returns, The Thing, and 12 Monkeys. And believe me, between my upsampling DVI outputted HTPC DVD player and HD-DVD, there is no contest, HD-DVD looks better in every way.

Also, I've noticed that the lossless compression for the audio makes an improvement there, even for my modest home theater set up. Quie an improvement over Dolby Digital (less so for DTS.)

You guys can sit on the fence all you want. I'll continue to enjoy my Hi Def movies. And even though both formats may die, it's not like they will send a goon squad over to my place and demand the movies I paid for to be returned. I can still enjoy them in my home afterwards.

-Ed
I was hesitant to pick up some of the older titles that I wanted to replace but this is encouraging. I'd like to grab The Thing and An American Werewolf in London but didn't know if the difference between a unconverted SD-DVD to HD-DVD would justify the replacement.
post #50 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jahn View Post
i agree. i'd even argue that DVD didn't even have a real foothold, even during blockbuster's heyday, but it exploded once netflix made it way too convenient to ignore.
Gonna have to disagree with you there. Working in retail in the late 90's, I watched dvd start from its infancy in dvd sales and explode once titles like the Matrix came out. You shoulda saw the hordes of people buying the latest action flicks and the parents buying disney re-releases for their kids.
DVD sales were blossoming rather quickly from 1998 and onward because it was a new format and very revolutionary. I'd argue that netflix is used by movie buffs and the average viewer still shops at their local electronics chain.
post #51 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakeride74 View Post
I was hesitant to pick up some of the older titles that I wanted to replace but this is encouraging. I'd like to grab The Thing and An American Werewolf in London but didn't know if the difference between a unconverted SD-DVD to HD-DVD would justify the replacement.
If you have an HDTV capable of at least 1280x720 resolution and have anything in the neighborhood of 20/20 vision, the difference is noticeable.

One potential downside, is how high res HD is. With older movies that weren't as carefully remastered, like The Thing, you can see every little scratch and piece of dust in the old film stock. But it's only really noticeable in the opening scenes. But I'd say getting The Thing is a no brainer, since the DVD was not anamorphic. I don't care how good the upsampling DVD player is, it looks like ass compared to the HD-DVD. You'd have to be blind to not be able to tell the difference on an adequate HDTV set.

-Ed
post #52 of 64
BTW, for mainstream standalone players, the $500 price barrier has been broken.

Toshiba begins shipping their new HD-A20 HD DVD player, which retails for $499, but is going be cheaper than that for street prices.

Although, if you count the XBox 360 and it's HD-DVD drive, it's always been under $500. And it's an excellent HD-DVD player (the DVD upsampling sucks, though).

FYI, most first gen DVD players were over $1000 when they first came out. Only Toshiba has a more entry level one that was closer to $500 (I bought that one when it first came out, I bought a floor model demo unit that was never plugged in for $400, LOL.)

-Ed
post #53 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by uofmtiger View Post
However, BD is the better bet for now...More BD players in people's homes and more studio support gives them the competive advantage.
That's what I'm thinking too. I've got a PS3 and a Xbox 360 HD-DVD drive. So far I've got six Blu-ray discs and two HD-DVD discs (counting the free Casino Royale Blu-ray and the free King Kong HD-DVD). At this point I'm only going to buy Universal titles on HD-DVD since everything else is going to be out on Blu-Ray at some point anyway.
post #54 of 64
1. Blue-Ray vs HD-DVD = VHS vs Beta
2. Money
3. Limited Movie Selections
4. Money
5. Just like 128bit music for many people, "if it sounds/looks good enough to me, why pay more?"
6. Money
7. Play a Blue-Ray or HD-DVD on a tube television? What's the point? Many people don't have LCD or Plasma and have no plans to upgrade anytime soon.
8. Money

If you didn't get the point about money, think. For many people over the age of thirty, it's about paying the bills, having a working car, a roof over your head and taking care of your kids. Luxury is secondary.

I have no plans to upgrade anytime soon. I've grow tired of companies trying to get me to spend my money on things "they" think I need. Sorry guys, but other than my music and computer (for work too), and even then, I am a minimalist. And I know quite a few people who don't have cable or satellite. Beware propaganada.

PS: I hope Jason Stratham removes Crank from his resume. I vote it one of the worst movies ever, and I loved him in Transporter even tho I'm not into cars.
post #55 of 64
The Toshiba HD-A2 HD-DVD player is on sale at Amazon.com for $309.99 shipped.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...6394286&sr=8-1

-Ed
post #56 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHamm View Post

I have no plans to upgrade anytime soon. I've grow tired of companies trying to get me to spend my money on things "they" think I need.
Probably the #1 reason both HD-DVD and Blu-Ray will fail. DVD is still pretty new on the media scene. VHS is finally dead.

Granted, there will be a push for more HDTV's in the living room in a year, since all terrestrial broadcast will all switch to digital. But since most people have cable, I'm guessing most people won't notice or care.

But if audio is any indicator, the vast majority of people don't care about quality. They care about cost and convenience.

For audio, we're in the minority here.
As are those that love HD video.

Most people prefer Bose and iBud earphones, but I prefer something better.
Most people prefer DVD's, but I prefer something better.

-Ed
post #57 of 64
The only time HD-DVD or Blue-Ray will catch on is when there is a drive for the computer that lets you burn them and backup your movies. No one wants to spend $25 on a movie that won't play in a year after you scratch it from taking it out of the case. DVD sales really took off when they released DVD burners. If the things are so encrypted that backing them up is impossible they will go the way of the SACD.
post #58 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by regal View Post
The only time HD-DVD or Blue-Ray will catch on is when there is a drive for the computer that lets you burn them and backup your movies. No one wants to spend $25 on a movie that won't play in a year after you scratch it from taking it out of the case. DVD sales really took off when they released DVD burners. If the things are so encrypted that backing them up is impossible they will go the way of the SACD.
Blu-ray burners are available today. They aren't cheap and the media isn't cheap but given some time perhaps the price will drop. As far as backing them up goes, well, given the current AACS holes it's possible too but not particularly practical. That said, I've never backed up any of my DVDs and they're all still doing fine, some many years old.
post #59 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edwood View Post
Probably the #1 reason both HD-DVD and Blu-Ray will fail. DVD is still pretty new on the media scene. VHS is finally dead.

Granted, there will be a push for more HDTV's in the living room in a year, since all terrestrial broadcast will all switch to digital. But since most people have cable, I'm guessing most people won't notice or care.

But if audio is any indicator, the vast majority of people don't care about quality. They care about cost and convenience.

For audio, we're in the minority here.
As are those that love HD video.

Most people prefer Bose and iBud earphones, but I prefer something better.
Most people prefer DVD's, but I prefer something better.

-Ed
I do not believe BluRay will fail. As PS3 sales go up, so will the sale of BD movies. We have already seen a huge percentage increase of sales of BDs since Christmas.

I do agree with a lot of your points as related to the success of DVD because it could work with any TV and get a better picture. However, HDTV sales have been booming over the last few years, especially with LCDs. So, there is not only a push for HDTVs, there is a successful push for HDTVs in people's homes.

Keep in mind, that BluRay or HD DVDs do not have to sell as many units as DVD to be successful. They just need a big enough market share to encourage the studios to release movies in the format. Since the studios want the added DRM features, they should continue to support the new mediums into the future.

The comparison to audio is not really a fair one. Many people use mp3s/bose for background music. They jog, clean house, work, do the bills, etc... with music on. Movies usually require more focus. This could mean that people will be more likely to want quality from that experience. VHS was just fine (mp3-like performance). The main selling point for DVD was picture quality and surround sound. It took a while to get off the ground, but it did eventually. I am not saying that everyone will be replacing evey disc in their collections. But when people rent, or buy something new, I believe that they will go with the quality if it is available and they already own a PS3.

Finally, these technologies are still in the early-adopter phase. As the prices drop, and they will, more people will want them for their homes. Also, BD, as I have mentioned, has the PS3 and as they release more games that people want, more of them will be sold. The key will be having enough units in the stores over next Christmas, which is where Sony failed on the initial release.
post #60 of 64
Most DVDs I only watch once, possibly twice, so it's not really worth the extra $$ per disc. Even then most of what I watch is anime, and I'm not aware of any HD anime releases to even try and sway me from the fence.
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