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DSLR user, What filter do you use for your lens? - Page 2

post #16 of 43
Well that is exactly the thing...IS/VR compensate for user induced problem - i.e. hand vibration...it does not make the lens faster or brighter. So if your subject is moving fast, even though you can take the picture at slower shutter speed, the Is/VR feature will be useless. I have opted for 2.8 lenses with monopod....

The VR/IS feature would also back fire if you are taking a steady shot where VR/IS is not needed at the first place. I've seen a test about it somewhere on the net. Basicailly, your hands need to be vibrating for the lens' VR/IS feature to work properly....if you enable VR/IS feature when your lens is mounted on a tripod, taking a still subject, the lens will act wierd and tries to fix a vibration problem that does not exist..which may cause the image to blur slightly...again, I did not do this test, but I remember reading it somewhere on the net...gotta look it up again
post #17 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by kin0kin View Post
The VR/IS feature would also back fire if you are taking a steady shot where VR/IS is not needed at the first place. I've seen a test about it somewhere on the net. Basicailly, your hands need to be vibrating for the lens' VR/IS feature to work properly....if you enable VR/IS feature when your lens is mounted on a tripod, taking a still subject, the lens will act wierd and tries to fix a vibration problem that does not exist..which may cause the image to blur slightly...again, I did not do this test, but I remember reading it somewhere on the net...gotta look it up again
I thought VR\IS was all mechanical: that they have some sort of gyroscopic/hydrolic dampening system so that the lenses are sort of floating. But is it really a computer in there controlling the lenses? Eitherway....maybe you get more vibration and blur using an IS on a monopod because it's somehow adding vibration to the dampening mechanisms.

But anyway.....looks like a good monopod is a better investment for me! Some of these telephotos are getting crazy fast now. I'd rather go for speed myself.
post #18 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by kin0kin View Post
The VR/IS feature would also back fire if you are taking a steady shot where VR/IS is not needed at the first place. I've seen a test about it somewhere on the net. Basicailly, your hands need to be vibrating for the lens' VR/IS feature to work properly....if you enable VR/IS feature when your lens is mounted on a tripod, taking a still subject, the lens will act wierd and tries to fix a vibration problem that does not exist..which may cause the image to blur slightly...again, I did not do this test, but I remember reading it somewhere on the net...gotta look it up again
that is SO wrong. Modern VR/IS systems are clever enough not to give you problems when tripod mounted. They're only not useful when you have a moving subject (they won't give you a faster shutter speed to stop motion).

I've owned and used about a dozen VR/IS lenses and I've never seen a difference in studio conditions with it on or off.
post #19 of 43
I use B+W 010 MRC UV filter. Closest thing to not having a filter at all. (well, minus the "haze" filtering part).


-Ed
post #20 of 43
No filter for me. As a macro shooter, I need all the sharpness I get. I don't care if good quality filters don't degrade image quality - they make me paranoid anyway
post #21 of 43
I'd think it is "wrong" too...but:
http://www.camerahobby.com/Review-70-200mmVR.htm

Quote:
We can also see that using the VR Active mode is actually detrimental to the image quality when used for normal static shooting situations
and really, please don't quote me on that...I was referring it to other sources.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Davesrose View Post
But anyway.....looks like a good monopod is a better investment for me! Some of these telephotos are getting crazy fast now. I'd rather go for speed myself.
Yup, I've bought the Manfrotto 680 monopod for the compactness and I'm deciding where I should get my sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 APO HSM Macro from
post #22 of 43
I have one UV filter (B+W MRC Slim mount), that I use for my 10-22 EF-S and 17-40 f/4 L. Those lenses are not sealed around the front element, so if I'm shooting in poor conditions, I use the UV filter. Otherwise, the only filter I use is a circular polarizer. I always use the lens hood, though. It doesn't interfere with image quality at all, can even improve image quality, and it protects your lens.
post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by dinoadventures View Post
that is SO wrong. Modern VR/IS systems are clever enough not to give you problems when tripod mounted. They're only not useful when you have a moving subject (they won't give you a faster shutter speed to stop motion).

I've owned and used about a dozen VR/IS lenses and I've never seen a difference in studio conditions with it on or off.
First off, that is NOT wrong, you are.

Both IS/VR lenses will slightly soften the image if activated while tripod mounted. It was true then, and it's still true today with the latest IS/VR technology.

I can put any IS/VR lens on a tripod, activate the IS/VR, shoot across the store to the other wall, and clearly see from looking at the fine print of the posters on that wall that the images are slightly softer due to the IS/VR being active. If I do the same exact thing, only with the IS/VR turned off, those same images are much sharper and clearer.

In fact, I just did this test a few weeks ago with the new Canon 70-200mm f/4 IS L, and both Nikon's 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 ED-IF AF-S VR DX and 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6D ED AF VR. I used the Canon 5D and Nikon D200 bodies for the tests, and the results were the same as always.

Canon's IS system and Nikon's VR system works in more than one way. Yes, it reduces your hand movement while standing still, but it also has another setting so you can pan vertically or horizontally. IOW, if you're panning horizontally, the IS/VR system will reduce the vertical movement. Likewise, if you're panning vertically, the IS/VR system will reduce the horizontal movement.

You can get by using the IS/VR with a monopod since you are physically holding the monopod, so there's still going to be some amount of movement that the lens can help clean up.


Quote:
"I thought VR\IS was all mechanical: that they have some sort of gyroscopic/hydrolic dampening system so that the lenses are sort of floating."
Daverose, you are correct. That is exactly how it works. Now some companies like Minolta (now Sony), and a couple others actually have IS/VR built into the body. This is a nice twist because you can use ANY lens, new or old, name brand or aftermarket and still enjoy the benefits of IS/VR.

Also, the word is out that Tamron will finally be coming out with a couple of new, interesting lenses such as a 70-200mm f/2.8 and a couple of IS/VR lenses. It's about time.
post #24 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by kin0kin View Post
I'd think it is "wrong" too...but:
http://www.camerahobby.com/Review-70-200mmVR.htm
That's a good review, and shows great examples that match nearly perfectly with my findings over the past 6 years.
post #25 of 43
Ah! I've totally forgotten about Tamron releasing 70-200mm 2.8 macro! that was a great reminder there Chops! I think maybe I should hold off purchasing the Sigma for now and wait for the Tamron. I hope it is as good as the 17-50mm f2.8 ...best of all....6 years warranty. I'm guessing the lens will have a ball park figure of $800-900

it's really sexy and retro looking
post #26 of 43
I've only picked up one filter for my Oly E300. A Moose Warm (81A)+PL Circular that I use on my 14-45 and my 40-150. It's like sunglasses for my lens
post #27 of 43
Thread Starter 
Hi guys, another question, Will it be better for me to buy B+W slim version? What's the advantages & disadvantages compare to the regular one?
post #28 of 43
I don't like to use filters usually just the hood but I use Heliopan SH-PMC.
post #29 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RYCeT View Post
Hi guys, another question, Will it be better for me to buy B+W slim version? What's the advantages & disadvantages compare to the regular one?
The only advantage you will get is that with a true wide-angle lens, such as a 12 mm, there will be nothing falling of the corners of your image.
The only disadvantage it will give you is that you have to pay more for it
post #30 of 43
Whatever the brand you choose, look for:

1. Hard-coated for scratch resistance.
2. Multi-coated for reduction of diffraction
3. Brass ring or ring made of similar material which has self-lubricant property to avoid binding, caused by severe deformation in extreme weather. Some aluminum rings tend to get stuck with the lens in low tempature.

My favorite brands are Heliopan, B+W, and Hoya. They're well-known for high quality.
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