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When doctors clean ears, what do they do? - Page 2

post #16 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by braillediver View Post
classic.

my uncle, a doctor, cleaned my ears with a large syringe. he even had a small bucket that contoured to my ear.

gave me some eardrops afterwards, too.
post #17 of 63
Okay so... like maybe 9 months ago my right ear just suddenly loses hearing almost completely. Like I can hear a bit of sound but next to nothing. Needless to say this freaked the hell out of me.

I tried a few things including being idiotic and trying to q-tip out stuff.

Eventually I go into the doctor. Basically like the doctor sounding fellow above described.. the nurse used a peroxide/water mixture in a giant syringe looking thing and pumped my ear. It didn't feel bad at all though it was a bit scary knowing that if she pushes hard enough your ear drums will blow (I've read accounts of this happening on the net which I did some research on before going into the doctor. It's damned rare though so have faith in your doctor.) And yeah a TON Of stuff came out and bam within an hr my hearing as completely back if not improved. Upon reflection... the process even felt kind of comforting and relaxing... kind of like getting your hair cut.

They then recommended I get some of this stuff:
Debrox <- Basically this stuff is similar the the peroxide whatever solution. Basically you can use it up to 1-2x daily or as you feel is necessary and it melts then bubblies up the earwax. After a shower that night or the next morning everything's kosher.

They told me at the stage I was at this stuff wouldn't have helped, but its a good preventive measure and reasonably safe. The debrox kit I got comes with something that looks like an enema rubber squeeze thing for flushing but not having as much faith in my hands as a trained nurses' I stick with just showering out the debrox'd up gunk.
post #18 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by recstar24 View Post
My doctor has this huge syringe looking tool, with a rubber piece at the end. He fills it up with warm water, and shoots into my ear, lots of pressure, feels kind of funny, and lets the overflow fall of the side into this little container. Then he shows me how much guck was in there, I gasp, and then he repeats with the other ear. When I come out, my hearing goes up 3 db
wow, I need to try this.
post #19 of 63
You'll think I'm crazy [or do you already?]. Nevermind, some people use hollow ear candles, which exert a gentle suction when lit. At least in theory, if the candle is well seated in the ear, all the crud is pulled out and burned in the flame. My brother had it done. You MUST have a helper to do this, and not set the drapes on fire.

Laz
post #20 of 63
Yeah I know about the candle but online peeps + doctors dont recommend it cus you can also damage your eardrum with the pressure.
post #21 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazarus Short View Post
You'll think I'm crazy [or do you already?]. Nevermind, some people use hollow ear candles, which exert a gentle suction when lit. At least in theory, if the candle is well seated in the ear, all the crud is pulled out and burned in the flame. My brother had it done. You MUST have a helper to do this, and not set the drapes on fire.

Laz
The ear candles are completely bogus. They do nothing to help, and any gunk you see came from the candle (not your ear) and can get in your ear in the process, leaving you worse than before you started.
post #22 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazarus Short View Post
Y some people use hollow ear candles, which exert a gentle suction when lit. At least in theory, if the candle is well seated in the ear, all the crud is pulled out and burned in the flame.
Anyone who has had a basic physics course will know that this is not possible. The reason people feel ear candles work is the wax that is impregnated in the paper has the appearance of ear wax as it melts. If you work the equations, it is easy to realize that there is basically 0 pressure differential even if you assume a huge flame and perfect seal.
post #23 of 63
yeah... ear candles are to ear cleaning as rainbow foil is to audiophile stereo equipment. that is, if the rainbow foil had the potential to make your speakers actually sound worse.
post #24 of 63
I just use a Q-tip and dust the stuff out. But mine is dry and flakey. It just falls out on its own.
post #25 of 63
I wish I had flaky ear wax It seems I'm the only asian I know with the wet type.
post #26 of 63
I'm asian and have the wet type. I can't even really imagine what the flaky kind would feel like.
post #27 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazarus Short View Post
You'll think I'm crazy [or do you already?]. Nevermind, some people use hollow ear candles, which exert a gentle suction when lit. At least in theory, if the candle is well seated in the ear, all the crud is pulled out and burned in the flame. My brother had it done. You MUST have a helper to do this, and not set the drapes on fire.

Laz
Once again people....
ear candling does not work and can actually be dangerous. Please click the link and read the entire page.

Quote:
Why Candling Can't Work

Since wax is sticky, the negative pressure needed to pull wax from the canal would have to be so powerful that it would rupture the eardrum in the process. However, candling produces no vacuum. Researchers who measured the pressure during candling of ear models found that no negative pressure was created. The same investigators candled eight ears and found that no ear wax was removed and candle wax was actually deposited in some of them! [3]

The notion that the ear canal is connected to structures beyond the eardrum is false. A review of a good anatomy book should dispel this notion. The external ear canal, with an intact eardrum, is not connected to the brain, the sinuses targeted by the procedure (those above your eyes), or the Eustacean tubes (the passageways between the internal ear and the back of the throat). While some claim that the eardrum is porous and quickly allows impurities to pass through, this is untrue. The "impurities" that appear in the collected wax (usually on a paper plate or other collecting device) are nothing more than the ashes from the burnt wick and wax of the cone itself.
post #28 of 63

Deleted.


Edited by labrat - 9/6/11 at 1:35pm
post #29 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by rb67 View Post
I wish I had flaky ear wax It seems I'm the only asian I know with the wet type.
I'm Chinese and I have the wet kind. I've never seen the dry kind before o.O
post #30 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazarus Short View Post
You'll think I'm crazy [or do you already?]. Nevermind, some people use hollow ear candles, which exert a gentle suction when lit. At least in theory, if the candle is well seated in the ear, all the crud is pulled out and burned in the flame. My brother had it done. You MUST have a helper to do this, and not set the drapes on fire.

Laz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icarium View Post
Yeah I know about the candle but online peeps + doctors dont recommend it cus you can also damage your eardrum with the pressure.
Do not use the Ear Candle trick, you can perminately damage your drum.
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