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Grado Worksmanship Kind of Sucks

post #1 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quick Rant Start:

I can recall only two headphones ever going out and they're both from Grado. I'm sure I've had others that failed me, but were more likely than not the cheapos that came with portable cassette, then disc players (so the almost disposable ones).

I had the SR 60's for about a year or so before one of the earcups fell off. The plastic that holds the steel rod broke and I couldn't figure out a way to fix it so out they went. Now, I dug out an old pair of SR 40's to use at the office, which have had almost no use on them, and the speakers keep cutting in and out with every movement of my head. As these are all plastic with nothing to take apart, they, too, will more likely than not be in the trash soon.

I hope the 225's and RS-1's at the house have better longevity than Grado's lower-end models.

Jeesh!

Quick Rant Stop.
post #2 of 54
wait, the rod box broke so you tossed the whole SR60? you know you could have sent them back to Grado and fixed them for the cost of shipping, right? which is like $4.30 USPS Priority?

the SR40 i agree with you. crap. but that was manufactured overseas where John didn't have much quality control.

all in all, Grados look kinda iffy but they're really pretty durable, and what you can't fix you can get repaired - don't toss em! well, other than the SR40. Mebbe iGrados too. Dunno.
post #3 of 54
...or you could have just sold the sr60 drivers in the buy/sell forum as there are a lot of DIY types here.
post #4 of 54
you should have sent the SR60 back to Grado they would have repaired it for next to nothing. Its a ~5 minute repair at most.

The SR40 however, I'm not so sure.

**edit**
Don't you people get tired of beating up on each other for the same thing ad-nausium?
post #5 of 54
My rod socket broke too, but I had had mine for about 2 years before they broke. A contact to Grado basically ended up with a $30 (or was it $35) repair fee to fix anything out of warranty. I was able to fix it with some JB weld metal epoxy. (I tried the regular epoxy but that failed within 3 months.) That was about 8 months ago and my 125's have been going strong ever since. You can get a pack of JB weld for about $8 that will last you a very long time.
post #6 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by AudioDwebe View Post
Now, I dug out an old pair of SR 40's to use at the office, which have had almost no use on them, and the speakers keep cutting in and out with every movement of my head. As these are all plastic with nothing to take apart, they, too, will more likely than not be in the trash soon.
Sounds like a worn cable or loose solder connection. I don't know about SR-40's but all the Grados with exception to woodies are easy to take apart. On my SR-125's the housing is held together by a hot glue-like adhesive. You can use the end of a spoon to open it up. There are a couple threads about opening up a Grado housing that should help you out. Just get some headphone cables from one of the FS forums (got mine from cantsleep) and a soldering iron; you'll have a working set of headphones in 15 minutes max.
post #7 of 54
Thread Starter 
The SR 60's broke many moons ago. Way before this site even existed, and I wasn't aware that you could send back headphones to get them fixed.

Live and learn.
post #8 of 54
wait, so you're ranting about cans that you bought years ago, and broke years ago? well...

things haven't changed since then.

But honestly, now that you know, buy with confidence that Grado has your back.
post #9 of 54
I do have to say, their customer response was very quick. I emailed them inquiring about repairs and I got an answer within 1 day. I ended up doing it myself, but I've read many threads where the OPs have described workmanship on repairs is nothing short of top notch.
post #10 of 54
Sorry to hear that.

I don't have any experience at all with the SR-40s, but from the other side of the coin, I have owned (and still own) many Grado phones over the years, and never had any problems like that.

I did have a pair of RS-1s that didn't look as nice cosmetically as I think they should have, but Grado replaced them for me. Also, the silver paint tends to wear off of the 'L' and 'R' indicators, and the raised lettering on the SR series.

Other than that, no complaints here, never had a Grado break or fall apart on me with normal use.
post #11 of 54
Grado's service is great!
I damaged a driver in my SR225 doing a recable (killed it!), totally my fault.
Contacted Grado and for the standard out-of-warranty repair fee I have them back and am enjoying them once again. While they were at it they even reterminated them to 1/8" for me as I desired.
I thought I was going to have to shell-out the cash for another set.
Pfeeew!
post #12 of 54
Our four grandkids ages 5 through 12 had almost complete control of my MS-1s for almost four months and just couldn't kill these cans!

They really tried; even tangled the cable in their computer chair and gave it a spin!! Ripped out big chunks of insulation between the "Y" junction and the housings, but they still play great!

The kids have since gotten new cans of their own, but I am none-the-less very impressed with the durability of the MS-1s.

....nope, the MS-1s are nearly under lock-and-key nowadays!!
post #13 of 54
Looking at the SR-60's, it would seem as though they are extremely durable, and I have yet to find anything wrong with them, at least in that aspect. However, the actual quality of the product, not the lifespan, is definitly in question. For example, there are small nicks in the plastic where the rod is attached, and the ear cup is missing various bits and pieces here and there. I do understand that I'm looking at a ~$60 dollar product, and they do sound great for their price, I just wish Grado had better quality control.
post #14 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by M0T0XGUY View Post
Looking at the SR-60's, it would seem as though they are extremely durable, and I have yet to find anything wrong with them, at least in that aspect. However, the actual quality of the product, not the lifespan, is definitly in question. For example, there are small nicks in the plastic where the rod is attached, and the ear cup is missing various bits and pieces here and there. I do understand that I'm looking at a ~$60 dollar product, and they do sound great for their price, I just wish Grado had better quality control.
if it makes you feel any better, you have just as good quality on that $60 can as Grado puts into its $1000 can.
post #15 of 54
I guess we are all programed that built in obsolescence is a factor in everything you buy.
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