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Krazy glue (cyanoacrylate) isn't corrosive, is it?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I used some krazy glue (cyanoacrylate) to repair some things on a circuit board, and there were like some solid metal bars around the area. The krazy glue dried just fine and it seems to work great, but when it dried it turned the metal bars a whitish color. That would be fine but I am worried it might be some kind of corrosion, oxidation or rust of some kind. Keep in mind the glue was not actually applied to the bars that turned white, it's like the vapors did it or something. I have no problem with it if there is no risk they could be damaged. They still conduct electricity fine. I did some searching on google and found nothing to suggest cyanoacrylate was in any way corrosive. Can anybody confirm this? Because if it is, it needs to come off asap.
post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by 003 View Post
I used some krazy glue (cyanoacrylate) to repair some things on a circuit board, and there were like some solid metal bars around the area. The krazy glue dried just fine and it seems to work great, but when it dried it turned the metal bars a whitish color. That would be fine but I am worried it might be some kind of corrosion, oxidation or rust of some kind. Keep in mind the glue was not actually applied to the bars that turned white, it's like the vapors did it or something. I have no problem with it if there is no risk they could be damaged. They still conduct electricity fine. I did some searching on google and found nothing to suggest cyanoacrylate was in any way corrosive. Can anybody confirm this? Because if it is, it needs to come off asap.
i dont think it is, i've never seen anything corroded by it. It is also safe to use on the body too for cuts. why not use epoxy and be safe?
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
I also have epoxy on it. I applied it after the krazy glue. I cant take the krazy glue off because I would need acetone, and that would ruin the plastic around it.
post #4 of 13
Cyanoacrylate is not corrosive, at least not the stuff I use. The white is just the color it dries if its applied thinly to a surface. I also use an accelerator though, so that might be why mine doesn't usually dry white.
post #5 of 13
IIRC cyanoacrylate is what we call superglue over here, and that gives off vapours when it dries which (again IIRC) can dry as a white coating. You can use superglue in this way to develop fingerprints as it sticks more to them.

As for corrosion. I believe there's no need to worry. But I do add the caveat that I am not SURE about this.
post #6 of 13
Yes, CA will cure to that whitish colour in cases when it can't completely bind with the moisture present in the material. As for corrosion I would only worry about polystyrene foam etc, metal is not a problem.

You know, once, when I was building my r/c plane, I ended up glueing one side of the 2 metre wing to the table, along with my hands . Fun stuff, that cyano, good for temporary wound sealing too.
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Ok, great. Thanks guys. Just wanted to be 100% sure because the piece I was repairing is pretty rare
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by vagarach View Post
Fun stuff, that cyano, good for temporary wound sealing too.
Indeed, it was used specifically for that purpose by medics in the Vietnam War.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitz View Post
Indeed, it was used specifically for that purpose by medics in the Vietnam War.
i use it all the time for cuts, it works wonders. I've had deep cuts on my fingers that I've closed up with CA glue and kept on working for the rest of the day. The pain is also almost completely eliminated!
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by stewtheking View Post
IIRC cyanoacrylate is what we call superglue over here, and that gives off vapours when it dries which (again IIRC) can dry as a white coating. You can use superglue in this way to develop fingerprints as it sticks more to them.
Yup, the lifting of fingerprints from hard evidence with the use cyanoacrylate residue (aka cyanoacrylate fuming method) is commonly used in forensics labs when the conventional dusting methods won't work on certain surfaces to try and lift a good set of fingerprints. It was first developed and used by the Criminal Identification Division of the Japanese National Police Agency in 1978. Cyanoacrylate fuming method has been applied to everthing from guns up to automobiles.

Small items such as guns and knives are placed in a glass tank where a small dish of cyanoacrylate is heated (it can also be placed on absorbent cotton treated with sodium hydroxide) to make it evaporate and release it's residues to coat the piece of evidence and revealing the fingerprints. Larger items such as automobiles are fully tented and multiple dishes of evaporating cyanoacrylate place within the tented item to fully coat it with residue.
post #11 of 13
Interesting - I had thought that it had been developed in the USA for use by the Medics in the Vietnam War to fasten skin grafts particularly to severe burn victims i.e. pilots.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by pne View Post
i use it all the time for cuts, it works wonders. I've had deep cuts on my fingers that I've closed up with CA glue and kept on working for the rest of the day. The pain is also almost completely eliminated!

It worked wonders for me as well when I was pitching competitively in baseball. I would get blisters from the friction on my curveball all the time. All it took was a couple of drops to close them up and I could keep pitching.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copperjacket View Post
Interesting - I had thought that it had been developed in the USA for use by the Medics in the Vietnam War to fasten skin grafts particularly to severe burn victims i.e. pilots.
I should be clear in stating that what I meant to say was that the method of cyanoacrylate fuming used in obtaining fingerprints off of trace evidence was first developed and used by the Criminal Identification Division of the Japanese National Police Agency.
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