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Are there any good ~$500 floor standers? - Page 4

post #46 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by gotchaforce View Post
im still not sure why people spend almost as much on the pre-amp and amp as they do the speakers. I have Monitor audio RS-6s running off a $200 receiver (onkyo tx sr603x), still sounds freaking amazing even though i cant turn the volume up past 75 decibels without some distortion (which i almost NEVER do because then im pretty sure the neighbors can hear it loud and clear)

Would you please stop trolling the boards? You have absolutely no experience at all, and have not heard any of the equipment you make claims about. Stop trying to act like you’re a seasoned audiophile, and start a newbe thread on why someone would spend more than 200 bucks on an amp for their speakers.
post #47 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CRESCENDOPOWER View Post
Look for a used Denon POA-2800.
Hmm, everywhere I've looked these seem to be going for quite a bit. Is there another Denon amp in the POA series, maybe closer to 100W or something, that would be cheaper?

I'm looking for something that I can get for $200 - $250. Possible?
post #48 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by CRESCENDOPOWER View Post
Would you please stop trolling the boards? You have absolutely no experience at all, and have not heard any of the equipment you make claims about. Stop trying to act like you’re a seasoned audiophile, and start a newbe thread on why someone would spend more than 200 bucks on an amp for their speakers.
What i am saying is i do not get in THIS world of diminishing returns, why people spend the same on a pre-amp and amp as they do on their speakers. Unless youre going to tell me that a pre-amp and amp suddenly double the value of speakers, it just doesnt make sense.

edit: took out all the unnecessary crap and argued points that were worth arguing.
post #49 of 63
Thread Starter 
Well, I don't really see why you brought it up anyway gotchaforce. I spent almost $700 on these speakers and am trying to get both pre-amp and amp for around $400 if I can (already got the Denon preamp for $180). That's a little over half the price of the speakers, which are $1300 retail anyway.

If someone wants to spend as much on their sound processing and amplification as they do on their speakers, or more, then fine. If you don't, fine. As long as you're happy with the sound that's coming from the cones to your ears, then it's all good.
post #50 of 63
While I agree that speakers are the most important piece of equipment in the chain (after the room, of course) I think it's ignorant to assert that amplification has reached its pinnacle in a $200 onkyo integrated.

To test this, I propose a hypothetical situation:

Lets say you have two identical listening rooms. In one room, you have a high-dollar, well calibrated audio system. For the sake of argument, we'll use popular equipment that many on this forum could reasonably be familiar with: B&W Nautilus speakers, a quality meridian CDP, and McIntosh (pre)amplification. While this may not be a perfect match, for the sake of argument, let's assume this is an ideal setup.
In the second room, you have a mid-90's Aiwa boombox, the kind with clip binding posts for attached speakers so you can remove them from the main box and place them around the room. The boombox has a cdp and amplification built in. For the sake of argument, lets say both systems claim to produce 100 watts RMS into 8 ohms, which both the B&W's and aiwas are in this case.

Now, let's say you just trade the speakers between rooms 1 and 2. You are left with $50,000 of gear attached to $15 of speakers, and vice versa in the other room.

Now -- which room would sound better?

I imagine the aiwa and the B&Ws may have the edge, but I doubt it would be by much. I think diminishing returns applies to both speakers and equipment. You can do far better for yourself by spreading your budget (somewhat_ equally than by sinking 80% on speakers. Source is important, too.
post #51 of 63
Also, for what it's worth Pibborando, I would look at a used NAD integrated, perhaps on Audiogon. The C320BEE, 325BEE and the c352 are all excellent. I'm using the c320 right now and it has sang for me for four years. Here's an example:

http://cls.audiogon.com/cgi-bin/cls....ran&1178850057

These units have become more popular in recent years, so they're easy to find used. Some people think they look hideous, but I like 'em a lot. Great sound is subjective, but I've never met a sould who didn't like the NAD sound (watch, now, as they stream out of nowhere to prove me wrong.)
post #52 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pibborando View Post
Well, I don't really see why you brought it up anyway gotchaforce. I spent almost $700 on these speakers and am trying to get both pre-amp and amp for around $400 if I can (already got the Denon preamp for $180). That's a little over half the price of the speakers, which are $1300 retail anyway.

If someone wants to spend as much on their sound processing and amplification as they do on their speakers, or more, then fine. If you don't, fine. As long as you're happy with the sound that's coming from the cones to your ears, then it's all good.
I know you spent the money already, i wasnt really trying to change your opinion or somehow reverse time, just trying to make sure people dont think its necessary. $400 out of $700 doesnt sound too bad, but i just assumed you were going to complete your denon collection which would have put it up to around $500.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherwood View Post
While I agree that speakers are the most important piece of equipment in the chain (after the room, of course) I think it's ignorant to assert that amplification has reached its pinnacle in a $200 onkyo integrated.

To test this, I propose a hypothetical situation:

Lets say you have two identical listening rooms. In one room, you have a high-dollar, well calibrated audio system. For the sake of argument, we'll use popular equipment that many on this forum could reasonably be familiar with: B&W Nautilus speakers, a quality meridian CDP, and McIntosh (pre)amplification. While this may not be a perfect match, for the sake of argument, let's assume this is an ideal setup.
In the second room, you have a mid-90's Aiwa boombox, the kind with clip binding posts for attached speakers so you can remove them from the main box and place them around the room. The boombox has a cdp and amplification built in. For the sake of argument, lets say both systems claim to produce 100 watts RMS into 8 ohms, which both the B&W's and aiwas are in this case.

Now, let's say you just trade the speakers between rooms 1 and 2. You are left with $50,000 of gear attached to $15 of speakers, and vice versa in the other room.

Now -- which room would sound better?

I imagine the aiwa and the B&Ws may have the edge, but I (doubt it would be by much. I think diminishing returns applies to both speakers and equipment. You can do far better for yourself by spreading your budget somewhat_ equally than by sinking 80% on speakers. Source is important, too.
I dunno i bet the B&Ws would have sounded really great at super low volume nearfield listening

and again i never said that you should only spend 20% of what your speakers cost on an amp.

I myself once i get the money am going to probably buy $300-$400 amps for my RS6s!!!

In addition to diminishing returns theres the whole order of things in my mind. Speakers first, amp second, dac/source third, cables last. Once you have the good speakers, its pretty easy to upgrade the amp later, and then when you want to upgrade your speakers, you can just keep with the kickass amp.
post #53 of 63
I'm not trying to put words in your mouth, gotcha, but you did advocate pairing a $200 integrated with $1300 speakers. I understand those of us with real budgets have to do this on a piece-by-piece basis, and speakers are a fine piece to start with, but your earlier posts made no indiaction that you intended to upgrade, or indeed thought anyone should upgrade. My priority chain looks different than yours.
post #54 of 63
Thread Starter 
Still haven't bought an amp. There's a few more I'm looking at now.

B&K ST 140, Bryston 3B, Anthem PVA-2, and maybe the Rotel RB-1070 if I can find it cheap.

Opinions?
post #55 of 63

Standing up for a good amp

If you have great speakers, like B&W 800 series, then audition it with two different amps. You will be surprised how much better it sounds with a stronger amp. I am not talking about more volume, but a fuller, stronger sound. I didn't believe this until I heard some older 801's with two different amps. Now I am a strong believer that the amp/pre-amp is important. Yes, speakers are still the biggest factor, but the entire chain is only as strong as its weakest link. BTW, I think you can't go wrong with a Rotel, Anthem, or B-K amp. I have a B-K pre-amp & I love it.
post #56 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pibborando View Post
Still haven't bought an amp. There's a few more I'm looking at now.

B&K ST 140, Bryston 3B, Anthem PVA-2, and maybe the Rotel RB-1070 if I can find it cheap.

Opinions?
I found the Rotel a bit "sharp" sounding (read: bright / etched / etc) when paired with the RS-6's. Don't get me wrong, I've liked the Rotel with other speakers - just found it *too* detailed with these speakers. I'd err on the warmer side. I have a Creek 5350SE which I picked up used to power these speakers that is luscious - but the $700-$800 price tag is probably out of your price target.

In your price range I might get a used Rega Brio III. Should run ~$400. It has a warm "british" sound - and though it only has ~50 watts (they rate it at 49 because they can't stand the "more watts is better" mindset) it's plenty enough unless you want to play at raging party music levels. I found it wonderful when I auditioned it with the MA's.

Other possibilities in the same vein are Arcam 65+ (also a nice <50 watt british amp). One's available on A'gon for $400 right now. Overall I'd just say that the Monitor is a really revealing speaker - in my experience if it's paired with too revealing an amp you can get "detail overload". YMMV.

J
post #57 of 63
you think that's bad???
I have a 20$ amp with 1300$ speakers... and although i wasn't going to... this thread is convincing me to upgrade my amp. There were many things I was going to Upgrade first like my CDP first but i guess I can wait. I was going to buy the Sony CE595 because of rave reviews. I am currently using a PS1 or my zune as sources.
post #58 of 63
FYI
Set-up = Totem Acoustic Rainmakers (sex on a shelf) driven By Sonic Impact T-amp with regulated power supply (helps a lot.)

Link to the speakers
http://www.totemacoustic.com/english..._rainmaker.htm
picture
http://www.totemacoustic.com/images/..._rainmaker.jpg

I was thinking of upgrading to a Trends Audio TA-10.1 or a Little Dot T-100. What do you guys think. I don't have 1000$ to spend on a used stereo amp. I have Denon avr-1400 and Kenwood 107VR surround amps but they don't get used much anymore
post #59 of 63
Sorry OP for high-jacking your thread but the thread was to help you chose speakers that you have purchased. And since the thread deviated already i got a little carried away
post #60 of 63
I used to own the B*W dm603 s3 , they where nice warm bassy sounding speakers... Highs where engaging but unrefined. Bass was overbearing and mids where a bit muffled. Still very good for rock and pop. Not really for jazz and classical.

The hawthorne audio silver iris open baffle speakers I have now are mucho better, they sound good with everything. Live big soundstage natural OB bass and smooth highs. Unbelievable value for under 400 dollar speakers.
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