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post #23176 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3X0 View Post

So I got my SRM-T1 today and it's HUGE! I honestly had no idea what I was getting into.

 

I heard the HEV70 sounds like a portable amp compared to other electrostatic amps, but I had no idea it looked like one compared to them too. redface.gif

 

Even the cord was a beast in of itself!


Guess I was as surprised as you. I thought my MF x-can was an average size headamp, so I figured the Stax probably was a little bigger... Can't really have it on my desk tongue_smile.gif


Edited by davidsh - 6/26/13 at 3:37pm
post #23177 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by telecaster View Post

For ur education red book is CDs... 96Db noise to signal ratio is not enough. 120db would have been. A n orchestra fortissimo is 120db...
I meant perfect media forever.
For the consumer for God sakes, mastering is another story.

 

You might be confusing sound to noise ratio with dynamic range. 16 bits allow for a 98 db dynamic range but the sound to noise ratio for a DAC may be higher than that even when that DAC is only dealing with redbook. Also the 120db peak doesn't necessarily matter as the lowest level will be quite above 0 db. Even good orchestra recordings still fit well within the 16 bit range.

 

I too would like to see a link to the German study. Without looking over the stats for the study it's impossible to say whether those 2% weren't just lucky guesses.

 

Oh wait this is the Stax thread. Um ok, say you really want to listen to something at 120db, then the 007 MK1s would fit the bill perfectly. Got a chance to try out the LL2 a few weeks back and was quite pleasantly surprised at the amount of life it pumped into the 007s.

post #23178 of 24765

actually you are 5 dB short of 120 dB with LL2 and 100 dB/100 Vrms Stax by the numbers

 

it is rare to do better than NC20 in a home listening room and headphones have a higher noise floor than speakers even in an anechoic chamber after minutes of accommodation - nothing you are getting close to when listening to music at even "polite" levels

 

perceptual noise shaped dither is common today so even RedBook can deliver >110 dB A-weighted S/N - plenty to max out the ES headphone/amp SPL and still have source noise be below any common listening case actual noise floor/human perceptual limit


Edited by jcx - 6/26/13 at 7:06pm
post #23179 of 24765

Why does said words in your profile make you cringe?

 

Because they're all words that are either totally meaningless and non-descriptive (poor writing/reviewing skills), used to add weasel weight to an opinion, or some combination thereof.

Let's take the word "musical" here. (definition provided by Merriam-Webster)

 

 

This word is completely useless to meaningfully communicate anything related to audio because it has no objective definition in terms of a sound signature. It describes nothing. One person's musical is usually another person's harsh, bright, wooly, bassy, honky, muddy, et cetera. When a reviewer describes something as "musical", it basically just means they liked the sound signature provided... it doesn't communicate anything about what the sound signature actually is. It's just a really weaselly word and I see it used way too often to describe gear as if it was some kind of objective, measurable attribute.

 

For the last two words, it might seem kind of odd I included them in my list, but they annoy me because they're just lazy. The sentence "the bass is good" does not tell me anything about the bass, other than the fact that said reviewer apparently liked it. The sentence "the bass had strong mid-bass punch and a lot of rumble in the sub-bass, but was a bit boomy in the bass harmonics and low mids" tells me quite a bit. Which sentence would you prefer to read if you're trying to figure out if you're going to spend hundreds of dollars on a piece of gear?

 

The entire point of a review is to communicate meaningful, universal attributes about a product so that other people can decide if they want to own it as well, not to rant, rave, or inflate someone's e-peen biggrin.gif


Edited by Tus-Chan - 6/26/13 at 8:11pm
post #23180 of 24765

Beats bass are goood.

post #23181 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tus-Chan View Post

Why does said words in your profile make you cringe?

 

Because they're all words that are either totally meaningless and non-descriptive (poor writing/reviewing skills), used to add weasel weight to an opinion, or some combination thereof.

Let's take the word "musical" here. (definition provided by Merriam-Webster)

 

 

This word is completely useless to meaningfully communicate anything related to audio because it has no objective definition in terms of a sound signature. It describes nothing. One person's musical is usually another person's harsh, bright, wooly, bassy, honky, muddy, et cetera. When a reviewer describes something as "musical", it basically just means they liked the sound signature provided... it doesn't communicate anything about what the sound signature actually is. It's just a really weaselly word and I see it used way too often to describe gear.

 

For the last two words, it might seem kind of odd I included them in my list, but they annoy me because they're just lazy. The sentence "the bass is good" does not tell me anything about the bass, other than the fact that said reviewer apparently liked it. The sentence "the bass had strong mid-bass punch and a lot of rumble in the sub-bass, but was a bit boomy in the bass harmonics and low mids" tells me quite a bit. Which sentence would you prefer to read if you're trying to figure out if you're going to spend hundreds of dollars on a piece of gear?

Ha, speaking of words that make people cringe, "sing" annoys the heck out of me.

 

The LCD-2's really sing when paired with an amp of "proper" power. aslukfdhlaksjdfhlwkej *cringe*

post #23182 of 24765

The LCD-2's really sing when paired with an amp of "proper" power. aslukfdhlaksjdfhlwkej *cringe*

 

 

I agree with you so much that I think I'll add that to my list of shame. tongue.gif

post #23183 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tus-Chan View Post

 

I agree with you so much that I think I'll add that to my list of shame. tongue.gif

Well the many times that I have mentioned about how musical my Gamma Pro's are, I always relate it to the pleasing sounding aspects of it, like it's no speed demon of my Omega, it's no detail king like my HD800, it's no perfect headphone but heck it reproduces music in it's own unique sounding way that is just pleasing to my ears personally.

 

If it's one audiophile head-fi term I hate and see no sense behind it, it is PRaT. Like who da fk invented such a useless acronym? 

post #23184 of 24765

The PRaT of a given headphone is in direct proportion to its musicality tongue.gif

post #23185 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcx View Post

actually you are 5 dB short of 120 dB with LL2 and 100 dB/100 Vrms Stax by the numbers

 

it is rare to do better than NC20 in a home listening room and headphones have a higher noise floor than speakers even in an anechoic chamber after minutes of accommodation - nothing you are getting close to when listening to music at even "polite" levels

 

perceptual noise shaped dither is common today so even RedBook can deliver >110 dB A-weighted S/N - plenty to max out the ES headphone/amp SPL and still have source noise be below any common listening case actual noise floor/human perceptual limit

I might have Fallen for the numbers war in commercial publication about 20bits being better than the acceptable 16bits.

I only listen to redbooks as most of if not all of my Library is not avail on High rez. I have no complaints about the 16 bits limit, and frankly I remember the days of tape and vinyl, and I still am amazed when people are debating sound improvements in DACs above 300$ when you have already low noise floor.

post #23186 of 24765

PRaT = Pace, Rhythm and Timing.    Whatever that means............

post #23187 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by wink View Post

Whatever that means............

Mumbo jumbo.

post #23188 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by ??

 

The LCD-2's really sing when paired with an amp of "proper" power. aslukfdhlaksjdfhlwkej *cringe*

 

I have an Audio-GD NFB-10ES , feeding SPDIF  to it and running the LCD-2's  on it (balanced or unbalanced, either way)  is my favorite way to use the LCD-2's.  The NFB-10ES  has plenty of power  (over 20 volts RMS  from the balanced output) and the slightly bright character of the NFB-10ES goes nicely with the slightly un-bright LCD-2s.  This lets me enjoy the bass texture from the LCD-2's that I like so well and also hear some highs.  But I have to say I am spoiled by my electrostatic 'phones (Stax and Koss)  - after listening for a while to the LCD-2's  I wanted to go back to Stax or Koss.  The LCD-2's sound veiled, even on the NFB-10ES.  I like their bass BUT....

 

By the way, I listened to the NFB-10ES DAC output using another amp, and that didn't sound bright.  I think it may be the amp section of the NFB-10ES that is a bit bright, not the Sabre DAC. More testing and a full report to follow, some day....

post #23189 of 24765

KG/Spritzer will we ever see a thyratron tube based Stax amp? It looks purty when it glows up with the blue plasma.

post #23190 of 24765

Due to its design Thyratrons either pass no plate current or unlimited plate current there are no graduations between that.Each electrode structure has a particular value of negative grid voltage that will cut off the plate current completely. When the grid current is reduced below the critical figure -plate current flows.. When plate current flows the grid loses all control over it and can only be stopped by braking the circuit.They do look nice though.

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