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post #21376 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacedonianHero View Post

Settling in with my new Head Amp KGSS (picked up in a local deal). Very impressed so far with my SR009s. Imaging seems wider (closer to my HD800s now). Bass is more robust and even tighter. It's built like pretty much everything Justin builds...solid and very professional. 

 

Anyone interested in a MINT SRM-727II, let me know, I'll be listing it likely tomorrow. smile.gif

 

I saw your ad :p. Was wondering what you moved onto instead & saw it in your sig. Nice go with the KGSS mate. Does "robust" mean a deeper bass extension too?

post #21377 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by gilency View Post

 

Where'd you get my picture!?!?!

post #21378 of 24765

I sneaked in on you when you were working on your 009's :)

post #21379 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnakChan View Post

 

I saw your ad :p. Was wondering what you moved onto instead & saw it in your sig. Nice go with the KGSS mate. Does "robust" mean a deeper bass extension too?

Day 1.5 with it and I'm very happy with the amp. Justin's workmanship has always been top notch. I'm making notes as I familiarize myself with the amp. More to come...

post #21380 of 24765

Didn't know Justin still made KGSS'.

post #21381 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefQon View Post

Didn't know Justin still made KGSS'.

http://www.headamp.com/electrostat_amps/kgss/index.htm

 

Don't think he's making anymore any time soon as he's focusing on the BHSE and GS-X (and his portable gear).

post #21382 of 24765

He doesn't. It's not on the order page.

post #21383 of 24765

Well, this is a steal for anyone who has $500 lying around! Too bad I don't, or else I would have snapped that up already just for the SRM-313. Yama's/STAX USA sells replacement headband/arc assemblies anyway, so it's not difficult to complete the bundled SR-303.

 

Also, what's the overall stance on the SR-Gamma (Normal bias)? I don't expect it to be as good as a Lambda due to the smaller drivers (particularly when it comes to extension), but would they be worthwhile as a lower-cost Stax option whenever they pop up?

 

I guess I'll find out for myself soon enough.

post #21384 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by NamelessPFG View Post

Well, this is a steal for anyone who has $500 lying around! Too bad I don't, or else I would have snapped that up already just for the SRM-313. Yama's/STAX USA sells replacement headband/arc assemblies anyway, so it's not difficult to complete the bundled SR-303.

 

Also, what's the overall stance on the SR-Gamma (Normal bias)? I don't expect it to be as good as a Lambda due to the smaller drivers (particularly when it comes to extension), but would they be worthwhile as a lower-cost Stax option whenever they pop up?

 

I guess I'll find out for myself soon enough.

Not bad of a deal....100v for the amp and no headband arc is a killer for me at least and no international shipping. Gamma Pro's have better extension more controlled probably due to it being pro-bias. Haven't heard a normal 6 pin bias one but there is one up for auction on ebay sitting at less than $100 atm from seller "whatjohnbrowningwoulddo" if you want to find out.

post #21385 of 24765

I have a question about the difference between the XLR and RCA inputs on my SRM-006t. The 006t has two inputs, one is RCA only, the other is selectable between RCA and XLR.  I currently have my Parasound 1500, which I can hookup using either connection (using Monoprice cables, and SR-007s FWIW).

 

When I listen via XLR I find the sound to be considerably louder. Am I correct in assuming this is because XLR delivers twice the voltage of RCA?  I cannot, however, discern a sonic difference between RCA/XLR.

 

More importantly, if I listen at high volumes, I find that that the amp begins to distorts at the same overall sound level using either XLR or RCA (i.e. not the same setting on the volume dial, but the same sound level at my ears).  Put another way, using XLR does not seem to give me any more 'headroom'.

 

Are my experiences consistent with the engineering of these amps, or have I missed an important step somewhere?  I am trying to better understand the benefits of using the XLR inputs, so I can decide how to proceed with future purchases. Thanks!

post #21386 of 24765
post #21387 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by oogabooga View Post

 

XLR basically just gives the amp with lower gain more headroom and brings the benefit of higher slew rate. Other than these two... I don't think there is any more potential benefits worth mentioning.

 

I'm no expert, but yeah XLR do deliver twice the voltage (louder.) The distortion; however, shouldn't be effect. It hard to actually tell the volume by ear; hence, the need of equipments.  

 

Not fimiliar with 006t's schematic at all, but here is one possibility which is very remote.

the "-" channels of the amp has some problem that's causing the distortion. When using single ended, those "-" channel inputs are shorted to ground, so you most likely won't hear the problem.

 

Wait for Spritzer for more detailed diagnosis.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tus-Chan View Post
 

 

win.


Edited by e19650826 - 3/11/13 at 10:41am
post #21388 of 24765
post #21389 of 24765
Quote:
Originally Posted by oogabooga View Post

I have a question about the difference between the XLR and RCA inputs on my SRM-006t. The 006t has two inputs, one is RCA only, the other is selectable between RCA and XLR.  I currently have my Parasound 1500, which I can hookup using either connection (using Monoprice cables, and SR-007s FWIW).

 

When I listen via XLR I find the sound to be considerably louder. Am I correct in assuming this is because XLR delivers twice the voltage of RCA?  I cannot, however, discern a sonic difference between RCA/XLR.

 

More importantly, if I listen at high volumes, I find that that the amp begins to distorts at the same overall sound level using either XLR or RCA (i.e. not the same setting on the volume dial, but the same sound level at my ears).  Put another way, using XLR does not seem to give me any more 'headroom'.

 

Are my experiences consistent with the engineering of these amps, or have I missed an important step somewhere?  I am trying to better understand the benefits of using the XLR inputs, so I can decide how to proceed with future purchases. Thanks!

 

I found this post a few days ago which is one of the best explanations I have yet to find on XLR vs Single Ended.  Credit to asr from http://www.head-fi.org/t/619365/woo-wes-xlr-input-or-rca-inputs.

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asr View Post

I suggest starting with this, if you haven't already: http://www.headphone.com/learning-center/balanced-drive-faq.php

 

The ideal way to form an all-balanced system is with: (1) balanced source component, (2) balanced amp, and (3) balanced headphones. There are caveats on each item though:

 

Balanced source component: These can be identified through their XLR outputs, which is standard for all balanced sources. However, not all sources with XLR outputs are necesarily "truly balanced". In order for a source to be balanced, it has to have what's called a "dual-differential DAC configuration", which essentially means there needs to be at least one, stereo physical DAC (chip) in each channel. Some DACs are mono-channel, which means that each channel will need 2 of that DAC, for a total of 4 in the source component - at least. Adding more DACs per channel lowers noise and offers other technical improvements, but manufacturers rarely do that, as it drives up cost.

 

A source with a dual-differential DAC config is where the entire system starts. If you don't have a source that meets this basic criteria, the whole headphone system will NOT be truly balanced. All of the sonic benefits from balanced operation won't be heard if this criteria isn't met.

 

I'd personally recommend not bothering with any balanced sources that cost less than $1K, because the inherent idea of balanced implies that it's two logical DACs, not just one, so it should be twice the price for twice the parts than a usual unbalanced source. In other words, a $1K balanced DAC probably won't sound any better than a $500 unbalanced DAC. To go a bit farther, I wouldn't personally waste any time & money on a balanced DAC that was less than $1.5K (excepting something made by Schiit Audio, maybe). And on a system for the SR-007, I'd increase that minimum to $3K, as the SR-007 is extremely revealing of the source component, much more than other headphones.

 

Balanced headphone amp: Some amps aren't truly balanced, and others are. An amp that's truly balanced can also be called a "dual mono" amp. Most traditional balanced amps are built this way and it's the ideal way to build a balanced amp, without clutter.

 

The amps that aren't truly balanced contain "phase inverters", aka "phase splitters", which can generate balanced output from only RCA input. The Woo WES sounds like it's one of these amps, from your description, when used via RCA input, anyway. (The amp would operate in solely balanced mode when using its XLR inputs, however.)

 

There are also other amps that generate balanced output through other means, without having XLR balanced inputs. While some of them do it legitimately, none of them will provide the sonic benefit that can be had through a balanced source.

 

Balanced headphones: Not all headphones necessarily support being able to be re-cabled for balanced drive. A certain number of wires have to be in the cable for it to work.

 

Also, not all headphones necessarily benefit from balanced operation either, and the most success will usually be realized on high-impedance/low-sensitivity or low-impedance/low-sensitivity headphones. I blanket recommend avoiding attempting to re-cable low-impedance/high-sensitivity headphones for balanced - every headphone I've heard of this type never benefitted sonically.

 

Note: this section doesn't apply for electrostatic headphones, as electrostatic amps are inherently balanced.

 

Balanced equipment: As I've gone through my own share of balanced sources, amps, & headphones, I'd flatly recommend against it in general. If you want to do it right, you have to be prepared to spend a lot of money, and potentially time. It takes a lot of effort to get a balanced system all in sync.

 

To achieve satisfaction faster and cheaper, it's easier to just stick with unbalanced equipment. I've found "balanced" to be vastly overrated and if I could go back in time, I'd choose the path of unbalanced gear instead.

This article is also pretty good from a layman's perspective IMO.

 

http://www.theabsolutesound.com/articles/is-balanced-connection-better-1/

 

The D/AC1500 should be a fully balanced source so you should be technically better off via XLR; the clipping you are describing I can't really answer for but is interesting.  Speaking of the D/AC 1500 - how do you feel it fares sonically?  Maybe my ears are broken but I haven't found great synergy with any of my other amps and the Parasound yet.


Edited by Mr.Sneis - 3/11/13 at 12:43pm
post #21390 of 24765

too bad so much of it is wrong

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