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post #5116 of 5774

I love the 18-55. It's sharp as a tack. It isn't as good in low light, but the 5100 can go to super high ISO with no noise, so it doesn't matter. The only thing you'd gain from a prime would be bokeh, and you'd be losing the range of the zoom.

post #5117 of 5774
Quote:
Originally Posted by RAZRr1275 View Post

I'm looking at a Nikon D5100 - Would you guys keep the 18-55 zoom kit lens or sell it and buy a prime one? If so which prime would you get?

 
I'm looking at the same camera and from what I've gathered the 18-55 kit is a very nice capable lens. And pretty much the perfect thing to start with. Go figure, eh? I expected it to be crap and to immediately replace it.. But, it seems that isn't really the case.

Look up some pictures shot with the kit lens, you should be able to get some very nice pictures with the D5100 and the 18-55 :)
post #5118 of 5774
I get by mainly with a 28/2,8 AiS and a 50/2,0 Ai, both of which are far cheaper and sharper on a D800 than any zoom they are meant to compete with.

I dislike the D800 though, wishing nikon would return to making FE style bodies that are small, light, and have great viewfinders. Of course, digital.
post #5119 of 5774

Im new to this thread and do not feel like sifting through it, but I personally am a professional photographer and while I dont feel like disclosing my personal site I will just say I am actually a professional photographer... (Its my job, I get paid, I have a degree) haha I got my degree from brooks institute so if anyone would like some professional based advice (from this point on) I will try and help anyone who has tech or photograph questions. Most of the equipment your interested in I can get within an hours notice and give you some first hand insight.

 

Hope I can help!

post #5120 of 5774

sweet, i can pick your brain :)   I'm getting some  shots with my D600, but I'm realizing I still need a flash.  I have a couple baby shoots, a few engagement shoots, and possibly up to two weddings coming up this year (I just started).  So far, I just got a cheap speedlight YN-560 all manual (actually the neewer tt560 rebrand), and RF-603 wireless triggers.  I plan on adding one more flash.....should it be a big one?  say, an SB-800?

 

I planned on using the cheap flash in manual mode on a stand with an umbrella box and possibly using my main TTL flash like an SB-800 on-camera or hand-held.  I also probably need some sort of diffuser for that as well, but perhaps the built-in reflector will be good enough..

post #5121 of 5774

 

 

 

my first off camera flash shots.  I might have added processing too heavily to these... It was mainly due to the distracting background. :/ 

post #5122 of 5774
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyogen View Post

sweet, i can pick your brain :)   I'm getting some  shots with my D600, but I'm realizing I still need a flash.  I have a couple baby shoots, a few engagement shoots, and possibly up to two weddings coming up this year (I just started).  So far, I just got a cheap speedlight YN-560 all manual (actually the neewer tt560 rebrand), and RF-603 wireless triggers.  I plan on adding one more flash.....should it be a big one?  say, an SB-800?

 

I planned on using the cheap flash in manual mode on a stand with an umbrella box and possibly using my main TTL flash like an SB-800 on-camera or hand-held.  I also probably need some sort of diffuser for that as well, but perhaps the built-in reflector will be good enough..

 

You will get a lot more responses, especially from pro's who actually shoot events, if you post your question here:

http://www.flickr.com/groups/strobist/

 

I don't know if you've actually tried to shoot an event like a wedding, but if you plan to use things like light stands, you will want an assistant.  If you plan to shoot all speedlites in manual mode, there is no need to spend the big bucks on something like SB800, which would be wasted placed on camera.  I would try to get at least 2 speedlites off camera, and if you want one speedlite capable of i-TTL on-camera for chasing kids, Yongnuo YN-568EX is a nice choice at good price.

post #5123 of 5774
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyogen View Post

sweet, i can pick your brain :)   I'm getting some  shots with my D600, but I'm realizing I still need a flash.  I have a couple baby shoots, a few engagement shoots, and possibly up to two weddings coming up this year (I just started).  So far, I just got a cheap speedlight YN-560 all manual (actually the neewer tt560 rebrand), and RF-603 wireless triggers.  I plan on adding one more flash.....should it be a big one?  say, an SB-800?

 

I planned on using the cheap flash in manual mode on a stand with an umbrella box and possibly using my main TTL flash like an SB-800 on-camera or hand-held.  I also probably need some sort of diffuser for that as well, but perhaps the built-in reflector will be good enough..

I can honestly say Flash on camera for the most part looks unprofessional, unless you have no other choice I would avoid it. Also when working with student in school via the alumni the biggest issue most new photographers have is getting a grasp on light as a tool, so using it on purpose instead of just adding more light to flatten the image. I would say try doing some lighting patterns on friends with your strobes (loupe, paramount, rembrandt, and split) are some of the main lighting styles. if you google for example "rembrandt lighting pattern" you can see some examples. Try to replicate those and you can really improve your control over your lights. Then from there try playing with the ratio between highlight and shadow, make a really small ratio so they are fairly close and then a large ratio where the shadows go very dark. See and know how to do this will help improve any photographer.

 

As for event stuff like shows you dont have much choice on lighting so bring a strobe and use it where needed. I honestly dont do allot of music events because the money sucks and I like to enjoy myself instead of working them haha, but a good deal of my friends shoot journalistically like that.

http://ryanbuller.com/#/singles/singles6 thats one of their sites, if you look he rarely uses anything other than existing light.

 

And for weddings if you're doing portraits setup lights and do something nice, but for anything else moving stands around is going to suck. The last wedding I did was on the beach, and I just had one of the little 14 years in the family who liked photography hold a bounce card and used that for fill light which is much easier than strobe because you can see it.

 

hope this helps :P

 

Ps: when shooting people try having them put the weight on their back foot (furthest from the camera) and watch how much better they look.

post #5124 of 5774

Just an example of what you can do in 5 minutes with photoshop. Obviously this completely depends on if your monitor is color correct or not, but if you were to print correctly it would look normal.

post #5125 of 5774
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon L View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by hyogen View Post

sweet, i can pick your brain :)   I'm getting some  shots with my D600, but I'm realizing I still need a flash.  I have a couple baby shoots, a few engagement shoots, and possibly up to two weddings coming up this year (I just started).  So far, I just got a cheap speedlight YN-560 all manual (actually the neewer tt560 rebrand), and RF-603 wireless triggers.  I plan on adding one more flash.....should it be a big one?  say, an SB-800?

 

I planned on using the cheap flash in manual mode on a stand with an umbrella box and possibly using my main TTL flash like an SB-800 on-camera or hand-held.  I also probably need some sort of diffuser for that as well, but perhaps the built-in reflector will be good enough..

 

You will get a lot more responses, especially from pro's who actually shoot events, if you post your question here:

http://www.flickr.com/groups/strobist/

 

I don't know if you've actually tried to shoot an event like a wedding, but if you plan to use things like light stands, you will want an assistant.  If you plan to shoot all speedlites in manual mode, there is no need to spend the big bucks on something like SB800, which would be wasted placed on camera.  I would try to get at least 2 speedlites off camera, and if you want one speedlite capable of i-TTL on-camera for chasing kids, Yongnuo YN-568EX is a nice choice at good price.

 

Ah, I thought having an iTTL one on-camera would be ideal.  How much larger is the flash/light on a large flash like an SB800 compared to something like the YN-560? 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattimis View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by hyogen View Post

sweet, i can pick your brain :)   I'm getting some  shots with my D600, but I'm realizing I still need a flash.  I have a couple baby shoots, a few engagement shoots, and possibly up to two weddings coming up this year (I just started).  So far, I just got a cheap speedlight YN-560 all manual (actually the neewer tt560 rebrand), and RF-603 wireless triggers.  I plan on adding one more flash.....should it be a big one?  say, an SB-800?

 

I planned on using the cheap flash in manual mode on a stand with an umbrella box and possibly using my main TTL flash like an SB-800 on-camera or hand-held.  I also probably need some sort of diffuser for that as well, but perhaps the built-in reflector will be good enough..

I can honestly say Flash on camera for the most part looks unprofessional, unless you have no other choice I would avoid it. Also when working with student in school via the alumni the biggest issue most new photographers have is getting a grasp on light as a tool, so using it on purpose instead of just adding more light to flatten the image. I would say try doing some lighting patterns on friends with your strobes (loupe, paramount, rembrandt, and split) are some of the main lighting styles. if you google for example "rembrandt lighting pattern" you can see some examples. Try to replicate those and you can really improve your control over your lights. Then from there try playing with the ratio between highlight and shadow, make a really small ratio so they are fairly close and then a large ratio where the shadows go very dark. See and know how to do this will help improve any photographer.

 

As for event stuff like shows you dont have much choice on lighting so bring a strobe and use it where needed. I honestly dont do allot of music events because the money sucks and I like to enjoy myself instead of working them haha, but a good deal of my friends shoot journalistically like that.

http://ryanbuller.com/#/singles/singles6 thats one of their sites, if you look he rarely uses anything other than existing light.

 

And for weddings if you're doing portraits setup lights and do something nice, but for anything else moving stands around is going to suck. The last wedding I did was on the beach, and I just had one of the little 14 years in the family who liked photography hold a bounce card and used that for fill light which is much easier than strobe because you can see it.

 

hope this helps :P

 

Ps: when shooting people try having them put the weight on their back foot (furthest from the camera) and watch how much better they look.

Thanks for the advice.  I especially didn't think about the weight on back foot thing. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattimis View Post

Just an example of what you can do in 5 minutes with photoshop. Obviously this completely depends on if your monitor is color correct or not, but if you were to print correctly it would look normal.

 

This looks pretty magenta on my monitor and iPad.. I actually spent a fair amount of time in lightroom getting it the way I did before--the sun was really yellow and warm.  I think my version came out a little on the green side, though.  I guess I should calibrate my monitor

post #5126 of 5774

Skin tones are always determined by the numbers, highlights are always equal parts magenta/yellow and cyan is always 1/3-1/5 of those in the highlight. If colors dont look correct it's due to an improperly calibrated monitor. (every single screen under 1000$ will be off, and some by a massive amount.) When most people calibrate their monitor it appears green and flat because monitors are naturally too magenta/blue for the most part.

It seems odd, but unless you are looking for a specific style this is literally how all professional color is done. You also have to remember that a good amount of photographs loose allot of data in the red channel when photographed under an improper white balance which causes some strange color shift due to the red being blown out. I cant tell if that is causing issues without the actual file.

 

Sb-800 has a GN of 125

Yungnuo is a GN of 34

 

So the sb-800 is roughly cable of 8x the power. (doubling the GN require you to quadruple the power, Via the inverse square law)

post #5127 of 5774

oh and the best way to check to see if red was blown out is to go into photoshop for example. Open the channels tab and only view red, then with the eye dropper hover over the highlights and make sure they arent reading 255.(make sure your eye dropper is set to 5x5 not point sample.

post #5128 of 5774

Anyone tried the new Tamron 70-200 VC USD? I am very tempted to upgrade my current non-VC Tamron to the new version.

post #5129 of 5774

I am also a photographer by trade, but tend to shoot nothing but gadgets and tech. Sometimes, I work at interviews and cover events, but my lens stock is best used for still stuff. Eventually I'd like to pick up an AF lens of some sort, probably a zoom. Nikon's 35-70 2,8D looks pretty good and is not too heavy. But I'll be honest, using the D800 outside is a pain. I'm looking into the V1/V2 for carrying to sporting events for use with my 180/2,8ED AiS; for every day non-work stuff, I hope to get a Fuji X-Pro 1 despite is many many flaws and tiny viewfinder. 

 

The D800 sort of proves to me that if for image quality/resolution Nikon rule, they have lost it with regards to ergonomics and weight. I won't be changing my lenses though. The 28/2,8; 50/2; 105/2,5; 180/2,8 and the Makro Planar I use will be great with adapters. If the Fuji works out, I'll probably sell the D800 and get another Fuji as backup. 

post #5130 of 5774
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattimis View Post

Skin tones are always determined by the numbers, highlights are always equal parts magenta/yellow and cyan is always 1/3-1/5 of those in the highlight. If colors dont look correct it's due to an improperly calibrated monitor. (every single screen under 1000$ will be off, and some by a massive amount.) When most people calibrate their monitor it appears green and flat because monitors are naturally too magenta/blue for the most part.

It seems odd, but unless you are looking for a specific style this is literally how all professional color is done. You also have to remember that a good amount of photographs loose allot of data in the red channel when photographed under an improper white balance which causes some strange color shift due to the red being blown out. I cant tell if that is causing issues without the actual file.

 

Sb-800 has a GN of 125

Yungnuo is a GN of 34

 

So the sb-800 is roughly cable of 8x the power. (doubling the GN require you to quadruple the power, Via the inverse square law)

 

thanks.  Are you sure about those numbers?  http://speedlights.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Man-Flash-Power-Index_04191.gif

 

I almost ran out and bought a used SB-900 after what you said..

 

Also, aren't IPS monitors sufficiently color calibrated?  Dell makes good ones for around $300.. also I believe most Apple screens such as Ipad screens are IPS. 

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