Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphone Amps (full-size) › The Cavalli-Kan Kumisa III Stereo Headphone Amplifier has landed
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Cavalli-Kan Kumisa III Stereo Headphone Amplifier has landed - Page 3

post #31 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by aegisofrime View Post
I know questions like this are probably frowned upon, but how would the Kumisa III compare against the PPA?
I wouldn't say frowned upon it's just the problem is which two amps are you comparing. There are countless implementations of the PPA and certainly more than one way you can build the CK²III. With most commercial offerings you might have a couple of choices to customize an amp but for the most part they won't represent large sonic differences. With DIY designs this is decidedly not the case.
post #32 of 75
I'm not so good in describing the sound of the CK²III with audio terms as ichiro does. But after build and using this amp for more than a month now, I can say that this amp is an easy to build and excellent (laid back) sounding amp at a very reasonable cost .

Some details of my build: It's housed in an ATI-735U enclosure while the 24VA power transformer, AC line filter and fuse are housed in a separate "wallwart" to minimize magnetic field interference. Clip-on heatsinks are applied to the output transistors (Toshiba 2SC2238/2SA968) and the quiescent current was set to 40mA. The electrolytic capacitors are Nichicon Muse FX, FW and HN. Philips (BC) MKC/MKT film caps and polystyrene are used throughout. Vishay-Dale RN55D resistors are used in most part of the amp and the volume control is a blue Alps RK27.





post #33 of 75
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferrari View Post
I'm not so good in describing the sound of the CK²III with audio terms as ichiro does. But after build and using this amp for more than a month now, I can say that this amp is an easy to build and excellent (laid back) sounding amp at a very reasonable cost .

Some details of my build: It's housed in an ATI-735U enclosure while the 24VA power transformer, AC line filter and fuse are housed in a separate "wallwart" to minimize magnetic field interference. Clip-on heatsinks are applied to the output transistors (Toshiba 2SC2238/2SA968) and the quiescent current was set to 40mA. The electrolytic capacitors are Nichicon Muse FX, FW and HN. Philips (BC) MKC/MKT film caps and polystyrene are used throughout. Vishay-Dale RN55D resistors are used in most part of the amp and the volume control is a blue Alps RK27.






That is a nice job you've done there. I like that case, where do you get those?
post #34 of 75
The case is from ATI Thailand .
post #35 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Solitary1 View Post
No, this is one of the more common questions posted here; comparing 2 amps.

From what I've been told the PPA and the CK2III have a similar presentation. I've never heard the PPA.
I have owned quite a few variations of the PPAs, and I can tell you that the CK2III compares favourably to some of the best PPAs. The CK2III is more of a laid back amp. It's like half way between ss and tubes.

This amp has some of the best soundstage and bass I have heard for an ss in this price range. It can make a pair of PX100s have the bass slam of the DT770s, quite impressive I would say. Soundstage and instrument presentation is very precise, more so than the PPAs. Vocals are focussed and placement of the performer is accurate; I can feel times when the singer is closer up or further back depending on the song. Overall, this is one killer amp, with bass that can put a smile on your face. It's amazing what DIY amps can accomplish these days.
post #36 of 75
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xeno7651 View Post
I have owned quite a few variations of the PPAs, and I can tell you that the CK2III compares favourably to some of the best PPAs. The CK2III is more of a laid back amp. It's like half way between ss and tubes.

This amp has some of the best soundstage and bass I have heard for an ss in this price range. It can make a pair of PX100s have the bass slam of the DT770s, quite impressive I would say. Soundstage and instrument presentation is very precise, more so than the PPAs. Vocals are focussed and placement of the performer is accurate; I can feel times when the singer is closer up or further back depending on the song. Overall, this is one killer amp, with bass that can put a smile on your face. It's amazing what DIY amps can accomplish these days.
No arguments here.
post #37 of 75
Can't wait to try and compare this one to my pair of PPAv2 amps (one with MJE243/MJE253, other with BD139/BD140)

Great that this one comes with a much more manageable pricetag than the $250 PPAv2

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xeno7651 View Post
It's amazing what DIY amps can accomplish these days.
Just like it's amazing what custom assembled by hand Aston Martin cars can accomplish these days.
post #38 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferrari View Post

Some details of my build: It's housed in an ATI-735U enclosure while the 24VA power transformer, AC line filter and fuse are housed in a separate "wallwart" to minimize magnetic field interference. Clip-on heatsinks are applied to the output transistors (Toshiba 2SC2238/2SA968) and the quiescent current was set to 40mA. The electrolytic capacitors are Nichicon Muse FX, FW and HN. Philips (BC) MKC/MKT film caps and polystyrene are used throughout. Vishay-Dale RN55D resistors are used in most part of the amp and the volume control is a blue Alps RK27.
Such a beatiful work! Very well done, nice & neat job. Congrats!
post #39 of 75
Why does the amp cost $300 to build? You can build a Dynahi for less than $300.
post #40 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xeno7651 View Post
Overall, this is one killer amp, with bass that can put a smile on your face.
x2. I am really happy with this amp. It really made the RS-2's even more enjoyable.
post #41 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by cotdt View Post
Why does the amp cost $300 to build? You can build a Dynahi for less than $300.
Don't know of any Dynahi builds under $300, with the custom heatsink fabrication, serious casing and of course the transformers, you would be lucky to keep it in the 400 - 500 zone.

I don't know about this one being $300, with a reasonable case and shipping from a few suppliers, you could still keep this easily under $200.

You could also always go with Jeff's kit - http://www.geocities.com/jeffrossel/

Price seemed to have changed, doesn't include POT, case or board, add those three and you've got yourself a full kit for about $120 + shipping, killer deal i'd say
post #42 of 75
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rb67 View Post
x2. I am really happy with this amp. It really made the RS-2's even more enjoyable.
It DOES seem to handle a wide variety of headphones, doesn't it? It works magic with both the Sennheiser and Ultrasones I have (had).
post #43 of 75
For the guys who own the CK2III, what's the gain setting on yours and what cans have you tried the CK2III with?

I want to compile a list of cans that the CK2III drive well so that I may try them with the amp in the future. For me so far, it works well with the K701s, PX100s, and UM1s.
post #44 of 75
Works great with Senn HD580/600/650s.
post #45 of 75
I have a CKK3 built by Jeff Rossel, I find the gain a bit high even for my hd-580. I'd rather have a lower gain setting. Right now the volume stays around 10 oclock on pot for reasonably loud listening.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Headphone Amps (full-size)
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphone Amps (full-size) › The Cavalli-Kan Kumisa III Stereo Headphone Amplifier has landed