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Describing Sound - A Glossary - Page 7

post #91 of 233
How do I look for Lows, Mids, and Highs in music? are lows like the bass and highs the trebbles? what are the mids?

i just want to know how to describe these in a review...
post #92 of 233
Yes, the "lows (are) like the bass and highs the trebles." "Mids" stands for "midrange" or "middle range", i.e., that area between the highs and lows. Good luck with your review.
post #93 of 233
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elluzion View Post
How do I look for Lows, Mids, and Highs in music? are lows like the bass and highs the trebbles? what are the mids?

i just want to know how to describe these in a review...
Something like this?

www.ka5cvh.com/downloads/musicchart1.pdf

There are plenty of variations on this theme to be found on the web. You will notice variations in teh transition frequencies, but the principles remain the same.

The one I have linked was found by googling instrument frequency ranges.
Cheers
post #94 of 233
Is there an audio version of this audio glossary?

For comedians in the crowd: no I'm not referring to reading aloud the glossary

Like sound samples to help clarify each concepts ? even with some exaggerations if needs be

Whenever I read text referring to these concepts, I often feel like a visually challenged person attending art classes, studying how to draw using braille textbooks.

(No offense to the visually challenged: hats off to your relentless daily courage.)
post #95 of 233
Very, vey helpful!
post #96 of 233
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by QRP72 View Post
Is there an audio version of this audio glossary?

For comedians in the crowd: no I'm not referring to reading aloud the glossary

Like sound samples to help clarify each concepts ? even with some exaggerations if needs be

Whenever I read text referring to these concepts, I often feel like a visually challenged person attending art classes, studying how to draw using braille textbooks.

(No offense to the visually challenged: hats off to your relentless daily courage.)
Can't say I've seen any.
post #97 of 233
I guess I should have googled a bit.

Here's what I've found so far:
Critical Listening and Auditory Perception
[HL472]
F. Alton Everest
ISBN: 0918371139

Critical Listening Skills for Audio Professionals
[HL5857]
F. Alton Everest
ISBN: 1598630237

Both are book/CDs combos.
The first one runs in the 200$, later one is more 45$.
post #98 of 233

Wikipedia this?

Is there a Wikipedia article about this? If there isn't, there should be. It seems like Wikipedia material to me - and you've already got sources.
post #99 of 233
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by QRP72 View Post
I guess I should have googled a bit.

Here's what I've found so far:
Critical Listening and Auditory Perception
[HL472]
F. Alton Everest
ISBN: 0918371139

Critical Listening Skills for Audio Professionals
[HL5857]
F. Alton Everest
ISBN: 1598630237

Both are book/CDs combos.
The first one runs in the 200$, later one is more 45$.
Actually, I think there was a thread on ear training in the members' lounge recently.
post #100 of 233
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taterworks View Post
Is there a Wikipedia article about this? If there isn't, there should be. It seems like Wikipedia material to me - and you've already got sources.
Interesting thought
post #101 of 233
Difficult to write a wiki article. the musicchart1.pdf is a useful guide but there are quite a few factual errors, with ranges of instruments and with some of the frequencies. For example: Tuba and string bass have the same low note "C". Kick drum attack is usually somewhere between 1-3kHz. Plus some more subjective errors: The high freq band usually goes to 12kHz and then the very highs. I've always associated ultra-high freq with freqs above 22kHz.

The problem is, all of us in the industry have slightly different descriptions and boundaries so it's very difficult to write a definitive article.
post #102 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by fordgtlover View Post
Helpful chart for sure, but it seems to me that according to the chart, very very few sounds hit the high range (6000+ hz). Am I interpreting it correctly?
post #103 of 233
Thread Starter 
^

The fundamental notes don't typically go so high, but harmonics do.

Check this link for more details on harmonics.
post #104 of 233
What about lush? I couldn't find it in the sticky.
post #105 of 233
Liquid?
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