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Describing Sound - A Glossary - Page 14

post #196 of 233

I still can't understand/perceive attack

post #197 of 233

Attack is the amount of time it takes for a note to reach it's peak amplitude. So, I guess a practical example related to headphones is a faster attack will mean notes will be separated better and thus, won't blend in with each other which can sound muddy.

post #198 of 233

thanks, your explanation on the separation of notes made me finally understand it :)

post #199 of 233

I miss fatiguing, well after experiencing it with rubbish earphones, I kind of like not having it.

post #200 of 233

I've looked around for a definition of this phrase:  driver flex.  Used in conjunction with descriptions of IEM earphones.

 

Is there a commonly accepted definition?   

post #201 of 233

I believe drive flex is the sound you hear with some dynamic IEMs when they are inserted into your ear - the diaphragm moves during that time as pressure changes, making this noise that sounds like crumpling aluminium foil.

post #202 of 233
Thread Starter 

 I've added:

- another, and hopefully more helpful, definition for Attack;

- a definition for Accurate;

- a definition for Treble.


Edited by fordgtlover - 4/21/11 at 7:38am
post #203 of 233
When you do update things, please also edit the wiki entry which I created for this.

http://www.head-fi.org/wiki/describing-sound-a-glossary

Thanks!
post #204 of 233

Thanks for this - great for helping me decode some of the advice!

post #205 of 233

Subs..

post #206 of 233

how would you define "neutral" ?? and "fowarded"?

post #207 of 233

can some one say what roll off & cut off stands for?!

at first I thought when a graph falls suddenly it's called cut off but when it drops smoothly it's roll off but one of my friends told me when the graph drops in the high frequency it's roll off when it's about the low frequency it's cut-off 

I now the question sound stupid but it is  bothering me for a long time 

---------------------------------------

& can someone please explain what cold & worm sound actually means?!

 

 

I know these stuff are very basic but sometimes it make me feel confused 


Edited by peaceful1 - 8/18/11 at 10:45am
post #208 of 233

The natural sound of a headphone can have roll-off in the highs or lows, but it can't have cut-off, that's digital.

 

I believe that's what the difference is, unless someone would like to correct me.

post #209 of 233
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by peaceful1 View Post

can some one say what roll off & cut off stands for?!

at first I thought when a graph falls suddenly it's called cut off but when it drops smoothly it's roll off but one of my friends told me when the graph drops in the high frequency it's roll off when it's about the low frequency it's cut-off 

I now the question sound stupid but it is  bothering me for a long time 

---------------------------------------

& can someone please explain what cold & worm sound actually means?!

 

 

I know these stuff are very basic but sometimes it make me feel confused 

I think these might help. Unfortunately, both concepts are beyond the intent of this glossary - to describe sound.

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roll-off

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cut-off_frequency

 

post #210 of 233
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanuka View Post

how would you define "neutral" ?? and "fowarded"?

 

Forward (ness) is included on the list already. I I'll try and find a good definition for 'forward'.
 

 

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