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DIY Cables -- Anyone Here Use Them? - Page 2

post #16 of 48

plugs

IMO, soldered plugs are more reliable, if you are decent at soldering. But some of the other styles might be good too.I have not tried them. I don't think soldering has a detrimental effect on sound, any more then any other kind of connection will.
post #17 of 48
Could someone kindly post some links to quality raw connector/cable suppliers? Soldering some connectors could be a perfect beginner DIY project for me.
post #18 of 48
post #19 of 48
Budgie got partsexpress above. You can also try markertek:

Markertek

In my experience you can get a quality connection using either soldered or crimp connectors. You can also get a very bad connection using either one. Solder connections however do allow a little more flexibility in connecting single ended grounds etc. For a straightforward RCA or XLR connection on coax I really like the Canare crimp connectors, especially if you use their cable stripper and crimper. Very quick and solid connection. IMHO.
post #20 of 48
imho using solderless plugs is just asking for an intermittent connection. the soldered ones just seem more solid.
post #21 of 48
Solder vs. solderless is a common debate topic on the car audio boards. The mechanical connection of a crimp is better than a soldered connection. The electrical connection however is debateable as to which is better. When I talk of crimp connections and connectors, the quality is paramount. The Canare crimp connectors are very good, and in fact cost more than many solder connectors. The crimp tool and die sets from Canare are also not cheap but are very high quality, have very strict tolerances and are also adjustable for fine tuning. But as I said, for flexibility in connection, you can't beat a high quality soldered plug. Just make sure you use a good strain relief with it or you will put undo mechanical stress on the connections.
post #22 of 48
A precision crimp is a good connection, no doubt. But the only one's I have seen that were good, were done on an assembly line with a industrial motorized crimp tool that is checked for proper crimp force on a daily basis. It is much easyier for a diy builder to make a good solder joint then a good crimp. The other advantage to solder joints is the oportunity to re-do the joint if not satisfactory. Pretty hard to do with most crimp connectors.
post #23 of 48
Where can I buy that Belden 89259 cable? Google brings back pages and pages of rave reviews and not ONE site that sells this.

Just found that Newark has them... at puny price of US$162 plus s&h plus taxes plus exchange rates plus duties/tarrifs/levies/brokerages... It is for the 100 foot but who needs that much?

Doesn't look like a good DIY choice at that price. Must find a local shop that sells by the foot.
post #24 of 48
Quote:
Originally posted by aos
Where can I buy that Belden 89259 cable? Google brings back pages and pages of rave reviews and not ONE site that sells this.

Just found that Newark has them... at puny price of US$162 plus s&h plus taxes plus exchange rates plus duties/tarrifs/levies/brokerages... It is for the 100 foot but who needs that much?

Doesn't look like a good DIY choice at that price. Must find a local shop that sells by the foot.
Yeah, that sucks. I'm in the same boat. Maybe we can get a group of people together and split the cost of a 100' roll? What'chya all think?
post #25 of 48
I'm for it. We just need to figure out how many people can benefit from 100 ft. Don't forget, 10ft makes only 5ft of cable.

I think Newark has a big markup. Other people are quoting $100 price so there must be a cheaper place to buy.
post #26 of 48
I just checked and my price on 100 ft is $133.00 (wholesale). The big problem is if I bought it and cut it into 10 ft pieces I would need 13 bucks to break even. Figure it is going to cost a few bucks to ship it and package it and your looking at around $20 bucks for 10 feet. Thats pretty espensive and pays nothing for the hassle. Let me make a few calls and see if I can get a better price anywhere.
post #27 of 48
You could go for 20 feet per person. That gives 10 feet of stereo cable which is not too litle nor too much and custs down on hassle/expenses.
post #28 of 48
I would take 20 - 30 feet myself. I have a few price quotes in right now so I will let you know what the prices quoted to me are.
post #29 of 48
Welcome to the biggest problem with 89259!

$1116 to $150 for 100 feet has been the market range for the last couple of years. A lot of people seem to have consistently scored the low end of the range at their local Anixter rep.

Other 89259 syndicates have pared down the hassle factor by requiring each participant to send the syndicate leader their own self-addressed, USPS-postage-prepaid packaging. Then, the poor guy at least only has to cut up the cable and drop it off at the USPS office.

I think there might be a more significant price break at the 1000 foot roll. If you guys put together a really big syndicate for a 1K roll, count me in for another 60 feet, 'cause I'm spooling towards the end of my last 100 foot roll. This stuff reputedly makes some giant-killer speaker cable, but you need double-runs of it.
post #30 of 48

Hummm

I can't get a better price on the belden, in my area.
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