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How to improve CD sound for peanuts... - Page 3

post #31 of 97
Thread Starter 

It's like religion...

For those who believe, good can come from it - for those that don't, doesn't harm them.

I would just say since it costs so little to experiment, why not give it a try - I think your ears will thank you, and your heart. It has smoother analogue- like heart warming sound - less digital-ish.

You don't have to buy a Plextor burner to try it - just try it on your present Burner, but with a Taiyo Yuden CDr ( less than a quarter for one ).
Burn it with the feurio program ( google search for it - download a working demo for free ), although it will sound even r on a Plextor ULTRAPLEX40TSi that allowes for 1X burning speed.

Burn it on the slowest speed allowed by your player, close all the programs, even the ones running on the background like anti virus ( the little tabls on the bottom right corner ), and leave your computer alone while burning.

You will hear a difference - you don't need golden ears to identify it on a blind test.

Since CDs become scrateched anyway, it's a good idea to have a copy, no?

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If you want to use window media player, upgrade to the version 11.
Right mouse click on the "burn" tab on the top, and choose "more options."
Choose burn speed, "slow." I am sorry but I made a mistake about this program doing upconversion. The creative zen mp3 software does it, among others.

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The feurio program makes better sounding copies though.

Shy away from quick copying programs like the Nero.

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The Mitsui gold CDr actually sounds even better than the Taiyo Yuden, but costs a little more - $1 per one, but they claim it lasts longer - longer than your life time.

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For upconverting software, if you buy a creative zen mp3, it comes with it - you can get a small one for under $60 on the Amazon - besides, it is one of the best sounding mp3 now - if you want your music portable. You probably have a friend who has a creative zen - try to burrow the CD and install it.

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Burwen Bobcat is a software that claims it can make regular CDs sound like SACD, but it's pricy for a software - $199. You can google search for it.

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Some of the sound recording programs also upconverts - even to higher spec. like the Protools program ( but costs $600 with the hardware - mbox ).

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If you have mp3 files, you can improve them on EAC (Exact audio copy)program with uncompress function, in the "tools" tab.

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I'm so excited about this, because for the first time, I am quite pleased with my system - I cured that upgrade bug, and for peanuts!

I hope it brings this much joy to all who reads this.
post #32 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonglee View Post

Burn it on the slowest speed allowed by your player, close all the programs, even the ones running on the background like anti virus ( the little tabls on the bottom right corner ), and leave your computer alone while burning.
Quote:

The feurio program makes better sounding copies though.

Shy away from quick copying programs like the Nero.

Quote:
If you have mp3 files, you can improve them on EAC (Exact audio copy)program with uncompress function, in the "tools" tab.

Um...Ok, so you are totally clueless then?

You're supposed to stop smoking once the joint is all gone. Just a tip.
post #33 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by DDF View Post
Thats completely false. There are two types of errors on CDs which teh player will try and correct: fully correctable, and interpolated. Fully correctable ones are as teh name suggests, all bits are exactly replaced, as they were recorded. Interpolated are when bit errors are extensive enough that the red book mechanism can't correct all teh errors exactly. In this case, the player uses the companies prroprietary interpolation method to replace the dropped words with educated guesses, with ones their algorithm calculates to be the best choice. Once the bit errors get beyond this, the players usually just blank or freeze.

What often makes one transport better than another is its ability to inetrpolate in teh most natural and pleasing manner possible, for error prone discs. The latest Rega prescans the Cd and chooses from one of at least two (perhaps more, I can't recall that detail) correction algorithms, using teh one that best suits the nature of the errors found on teh CD.

I started a thread elsewhere asking for recommendations for cheap CD/DVd players, which have the best error correction schemes (to be used as a transport with digi out and a Lavry). I'm all ears for suggestions.
Um, no.

The uncorrectable errors you speak will still be entirely localized. Unless your CD is TOTALLY screwed up, in which case you need to buy a new one. These interpolations are almost always hardly noticeable.

And in any case they will never be responsible for making a CD just sound generally horrible. CD errors will not last the whole CD, the players circuitry will not attempt to interpolate the entire CD!

CD's now a days sound horrible because they are mastered poorly. Simply copying them onto a CD-R, no matter what brand of CD-R, will change what's already on the CD.
post #34 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by nelamvr6 View Post

CD's now a days sound horrible because they are mastered poorly. Simply copying them onto a CD-R, no matter what brand of CD-R, will change what's already on the CD.
Ah, but you're not using gonglee logic If you take a completely clean CD....rip it to 192kbps mp3, and then convert it to CD-R.....that will eliminate all that nasty extra information that's on the original pressed CD

LOL....the smoking comments were funny too nelamvr6 LOL!!!
post #35 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davesrose View Post
Ah, but you're not using gonglee logic If you take a completely clean CD....rip it to 192kbps mp3, and then convert it to CD-R.....that will eliminate all that nasty extra information that's on the original pressed CD

LOL....the smoking comments were funny too nelamvr6 LOL!!!
Still waiting on the new turntable? That's one way to get Analog quality!
post #36 of 97
this whole thread was an entertaining read
post #37 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by nelamvr6 View Post
Still waiting on the new turntable? That's one way to get Analog quality!
Yeah I am.....but after reading gonglee's comments, I know I've gotta make a duplicating machine because original sources are so bad And I thought calibrating the TT will be hard!!!

This weekend I'll be hitting the vinyl stores to have some records ready. Hope to have everything next week. Though I'd better go read about calibrating now!!
post #38 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davesrose View Post
Yeah I am.....but after reading gonglee's comments, I know I've gotta make a duplicating machine because original sources are so bad And I thought calibrating the TT will be hard!!!

This weekend I'll be hitting the vinyl stores to have some records ready. Hope to have everything next week. Though I'd better go read about calibrating now!!
get that Fremer DVD, you won't regret it!
post #39 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by nelamvr6 View Post
get that Fremer DVD, you won't regret it!
adding it to my shopping cart now!!! So do you recommend any particular tools when I'm first setting up the TT?
post #40 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davesrose View Post
adding it to my shopping cart now!!! So do you recommend any particular tools when I'm first setting up the TT?
You need a stylus pressure gage. The TT comes with a protractor, and it has a bubble level built-in, so that should just about do it.

Doesn't have to be a fancy pressure gage, those Shure ones do pretty good.

I originally set mine up with a Shure. Then today the fancy digital one arrived, when I checked I was only 0.3g off! So the Shure did a pretty good job!
post #41 of 97
I took a picture of a beautiful picture at a museum. I then processed the picture at a a professional photography lab. I wasn't so happy with the 10 megapixel digital print, so I went home and scanned it on my cheap HP scanner. I think that the scanned copy I made at home is better than the professional prints and I'm pretty sure that it is truer to the picture I saw at the museum. Isn't this logical?
post #42 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by MatsudaMan View Post
I took a picture of a beautiful picture at a museum. I then processed the picture at a a professional photography lab. I wasn't so happy with the 10 megapixel digital print, so I went home and scanned it on my cheap HP scanner. I think that the scanned copy I made at home is better than the professional prints and I'm pretty sure that it is truer to the picture I saw at the museum. Isn't this logical?
I can't see how anyone would disagree!
post #43 of 97
good to hear! OK, so I'm getting the Sure gauge, and also notice there's a $15 rpm strobe.....will try that out too. Thanks for the tips nelamvr6....Now to wait for the TT
post #44 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davesrose View Post
good to hear! OK, so I'm getting the Sure gauge, and also notice there's a $15 rpm strobe.....will try that out too. Thanks for the tips nelamvr6....Now to wait for the TT
You better post a thread when you get it spinning!
post #45 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by MatsudaMan View Post
I took a picture of a beautiful picture at a museum. I then processed the picture at a a professional photography lab. I wasn't so happy with the 10 megapixel digital print, so I went home and scanned it on my cheap HP scanner. I think that the scanned copy I made at home is better than the professional prints and I'm pretty sure that it is truer to the picture I saw at the museum. Isn't this logical?
LOL!!! And if you get the premium HP paper, the image will last at least 300 years. You will thank me....your heart will ring with pleasure with all the vivid colors
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