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How to improve CD sound for peanuts...

post #1 of 97
Thread Starter 
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Many think that LP still sounds better than digital.
You should try this tweak to improve the sound of CDs.
The CDs you buy are stamped in less than a second - if you burn it in your computer, it is done slowely, and improves the sound.

The window media player can upgrade the epec to 192 kbps - left mouse click on the burn tab on top, and choose more options. Pick slow speed, and on the bottom, convert to 192 kbps.

Also the CDR you use makes a difference - Taiyo yuden are about 20 cents each and sound good. Mitsui gold costs $1 and sounds a little better ( and lasts longer they say 300 years ). You can google search for the places that sell them. Fuji CDR that is made in Japan also is Taiyo Yuden - sometimes you can find these at Bestbuys.

Modern CDR players won't let you burn at slow 1x speed. Plextor burners do that, and sound the best. You can get one for less than $140.

If you do all that, the sound will be noticeably better. Upper fr. are smoother, and less digitally - closer to analogue, and dynamic is improved.

It just sounds right and satisfying. This stopped my upgrade bug for a long time - hopefully it will work for you too.

If you are using the computer as the source, you can improve the sound by converting to 192 kbps. There are many programs that do that. If you bought creative zen mp3, it comes with a converter.

You can also download EAC ( exact audio copy ) for free, and it has a converter ( not exactly to 192 however ).

When listening, we should use the Asio program to enhance the sound - it fixes some problem in window Xp, and makes the sound smooth, like an upscale gear. It's free - just google search for it.
post #2 of 97
You are saying that an mp3 @ 192kbps will sound better than the full resolution track on the CD? No way.... a lossy track will not sound better, no matter what speed it is burned at...
post #3 of 97
are you kidding?
post #4 of 97
Thread Starter 

I made a mistake in the spec. but it's true - let your ear be the judge.

I meant 96000 khz sampling rate, and 24 bits, instead of 192 kbps.

If you try it, you will definitely hear a difference, and you will thank me then.

It gives soul to digital, if you thought it was lacking it.

I am listening to a CD I burned now - when I compare it with the red CD I bought, it's no brainer - after you try it, you will burn your entire CD collection like me.

By the way, the best way to rip CDs to your computer is with EAC program ( Exact Audio Copy ) - download it for free ( google search for it ). Use the wav format, and not mp3 for best results.

Pros at the audio shows are using this method, and the sound you heard at the hifi shop might be this too.
post #5 of 97
you must have stock in CD-r companies.

you cant add what is not already there.
post #6 of 97
You've got to be kidding man...better than source?!! Being "pressed in a second" has nothing to do with quality...
post #7 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonglee View Post

By the way, the best way to rip CDs to your computer is with EAC program ( Exact Audio Copy ) - download it for free ( google search for it ). Use the wav format, and not mp3 for best results.

Pros at the audio shows are using this method, and the sound you heard at the hifi shop might be this too.
Most people on here already use EAC already.
post #8 of 97
Thread Starter 

Just trying to share a tweak...

So much negativity when I am just trying to share a tweak...

Just give it a try and you will see...

If you burn a CDr even with the CDr burner you have, on a Taiyo yuden CDr, you will hear an improvement.

When you are burning, leave the computer alone, and it will sound better. Don't even move the mouse.

Feurio is the best sounding burning program - working demo version can be had for free ( google suearch for it ).

Burn at the slowest speed alowed by your CDr burner.
post #9 of 97
If you're saying copy retail CDs to CD-R, I think we may as well just use the original CD.

If you're saying how to copy music from retail discs to MP3s, most of us lot on this forum prefer EAC + Lame

If you're advising on brands of burners and CD-Rs then you're going about it rather confusingly and long winded. Just saying
post #10 of 97
audiophiles are such a neurotic bunch hey, but if it sounds better, more power to you
post #11 of 97
Speak for yourself! I'm no audiophile... I'm just a wannabe masquerading as a somebody. Truth be told I just repeat what others say... like a parrot on a shoulder!
post #12 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by LFC_SL View Post
Speak for yourself! I'm no audiophile... I'm just a wannabe masquerading as a somebody. Truth be told I just repeat what others say... like a parrot on a shoulder!
Even if what you're being told doesn't make sense? I have no idea what Gonglee is saying. First it was to degrade a CD's quality by converting to 192kbps mp3 or wmu. Now we're supposed to see a way to upconvert 16bit audio to 24bit in Windows Media Player. Where is this so called feature???
post #13 of 97
It sounds like placebo to me. You can not take information from a cd and some how upsample it. With a cd you're given digital data that is converted to audio via a DAC. A DAC is judged based on how it converts and translates the ones and zero's on the cd. It's actually not very complicated. You can't make 50 turn into 100. You can make 50 and compress it to 35. No add, only faithfully reproduce, or compress.

Silly, Silly, Silly!!!LOL!
post #14 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonglee View Post
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Many think that LP still sounds better than digital.
You should try this tweak to improve the sound of CDs.
The CDs you buy are stamped in less than a second - if you burn it in your computer, it is done slowely, and improves the sound.

The window media player can upgrade the epec to 192 kbps - left mouse click on the burn tab on top, and choose more options. Pick slow speed, and on the bottom, convert to 192 kbps.

Also the CDR you use makes a difference - Taiyo yuden are about 20 cents each and sound good. Mitsui gold costs $1 and sounds a little better ( and lasts longer they say 300 years ). You can google search for the places that sell them. Fuji CDR that is made in Japan also is Taiyo Yuden - sometimes you can find these at Bestbuys.

Modern CDR players won't let you burn at slow 1x speed. Plextor burners do that, and sound the best. You can get one for less than $140.

If you do all that, the sound will be noticeably better. Upper fr. are smoother, and less digitally - closer to analogue, and dynamic is improved.

It just sounds right and satisfying. This stopped my upgrade bug for a long time - hopefully it will work for you too.

If you are using the computer as the source, you can improve the sound by converting to 192 kbps. There are many programs that do that. If you bought creative zen mp3, it comes with a converter.

You can also download EAC ( exact audio copy ) for free, and it has a converter ( not exactly to 192 however ).

When listening, we should use the Asio program to enhance the sound - it fixes some problem in window Xp, and makes the sound smooth, like an upscale gear. It's free - just google search for it.

Sorry, I'm gonna have to throw a BS flag.

About 99.9999% of what you typed is complete crap.

Complete. Crap.

I appreciate the mindset where you want to help others. That is commendable.

But it would help if you knew at least SOMETHING about your subject.

Using a computer as a transport can in fact provide a noticeable improvement, but not for any of the reasons you mentioned.
post #15 of 97
yeah, each upsampling scheme (be it audio or video) is just an algorithm to try to fill in the gaps where the original sample is. I have an upconversion DVD player....don't see a huge difference in picture quality going from 480p to 1080i on it, the way I do a true HD source. My CD player actually lets me switch from 16bit to upsampled 24bit. I can't hear a huge difference....very subtle, and it's all just added information from the DAC. Not nearly as good as SACD. I like my dedicated DAC best for all redbook audio....I don't attest it as being great at upsampling...it's just great at converting those 1s and 0s to sound!
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