Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › Team colourblind: are you in it?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Team colourblind: are you in it? - Page 4

post #46 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davesrose View Post
Calling color blindness a "minor disability" is a good point: you listed some interesting examples of when it's been a problem for you. But at least you have your sight and can work around it, so it's not a full disability like blindness. Good for you for defying your kindergarden teacher. I've been drawing for as long as I can remember, and I remember my kindergarden teacher saying we had to color within the lines. That floored me, because I wanted to draw my own lines!!!! Maybe it's not so much what we're born with, but what our kindergarden teacher says we can't do that determines what we'll do in life
well, the sad thing was, i thought it was the right color. i guess she thought i was retarded.

i've been researching corrective lenses for cb people. i still have a red lens given to me as a child to look through to check colors, but it is a pain to use.
post #47 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by redshifter View Post
well, the sad thing was, i thought it was the right color. i guess she thought i was retarded.
Colourblind + astigmatic means that this came up with me in grade school a lot. At least before I knew what was going on and got glasses.
post #48 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by toastmaster View Post
Colourblind + astigmatic means that this came up with me in grade school a lot. At least before I knew what was going on and got glasses.
i still can't find any info on corrective lenses for cb-ness. did you have any luck?
post #49 of 82
For those who are colorblind, do other people's clothes appear to you mismatched?

For example, if I wore a X color shirt and Y color pants that looks okay to a non-colorblind person, would a person who is colorblind for X and Y colors see it as a little funny choice in colors?

I would think part of our tastes for matching colors in clothes comes from societal influences (what's in fashion for the time). I'm just curious if a colorblind person also gets that sense, but just perceives the colors differently than others, or if he will always feel as if people were wearing mismached colors.
post #50 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by redshifter View Post
i still can't find any info on corrective lenses for cb-ness. did you have any luck?
I've never really looked into it. Mine has never really held me back from anything I didn't want to do in the first place, so I've never had the drive. I might ask more about it the next time I have an optometrist appointment because it does interest me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnaround View Post
For those who are colorblind, do other people's clothes appear to you mismatched?
That's never really come up for me. I do, however, have to go clothes shopping with another person so that I don't buy purple pants or shirts. I realized the other day that I would even wear a purple shirt, but by this point, with so many of my friends knowing I'm colourblind, they probably wouldn't believe I bought it on purpose.
post #51 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnaround View Post
For those who are colorblind, do other people's clothes appear to you mismatched?

For example, if I wore a X color shirt and Y color pants that looks okay to a non-colorblind person, would a person who is colorblind for X and Y colors see it as a little funny choice in colors?

I would think part of our tastes for matching colors in clothes comes from societal influences (what's in fashion for the time). I'm just curious if a colorblind person also gets that sense, but just perceives the colors differently than others, or if he will always feel as if people were wearing mismached colors.
i never noticed mismatched clothes on others. i'm sure i've worn a couple doozies in my time.

these days it is mainly jeans and a neutral shirt. or blue.
post #52 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by redshifter View Post
i still can't find any info on corrective lenses for cb-ness. did you have any luck?
It's not a lens, but on the color blindness simulator site, they have a tool called "Daltonizer" that uses image processing to correct for color blindness. You might want to check it out. They do explain that there is no universal way to correct for colorblindness that will work for all images though.

Quote:
For those who are colorblind, do other people's clothes appear to you mismatched?

For example, if I wore a X color shirt and Y color pants that looks okay to a non-colorblind person, would a person who is colorblind for X and Y colors see it as a little funny choice in colors?
As far as I can tell from the colorblindness simulator online, a matched set of clothes still looks matched to a colorblind person. It's basically like converting a full color image to a duotone image. That's assuming by "matched" you mean similar colors. If by matching you mean very different or complementary colors that happen to look good together, then it is possible to create color combinations that look different to a colorblind person.
post #53 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnaround View Post
For those who are colorblind, do other people's clothes appear to you mismatched?

For example, if I wore a X color shirt and Y color pants that looks okay to a non-colorblind person, would a person who is colorblind for X and Y colors see it as a little funny choice in colors?

I would think part of our tastes for matching colors in clothes comes from societal influences (what's in fashion for the time). I'm just curious if a colorblind person also gets that sense, but just perceives the colors differently than others, or if he will always feel as if people were wearing mismached colors.
No.. because we acquired the matching taste from normal people

You know what i hate? People who goes 'what colour is this?' and when i answer it right they's say i'm not colourblind
And then spending the next half hour explaining that i've been brought up by people who sees normal colours, so i'd name the colours their way
post #54 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanY View Post
It's not a lens, but on the color blindness simulator site, they have a tool called "Daltonizer" that uses image processing to correct for color blindness. You might want to check it out. They do explain that there is no universal way to correct for colorblindness that will work for all images though.



As far as I can tell from the colorblindness simulator online, a matched set of clothes still looks matched to a colorblind person. It's basically like converting a full color image to a duotone image. That's assuming by "matched" you mean similar colors. If by matching you mean very different or complementary colors that happen to look good together, then it is possible to create color combinations that look different to a colorblind person.

thanks. i was thinking about a contact lens for real life, not changing the colors on my pc.


i checked out those "simulators". the "enhanced" painting for cb people looks waaay off to my eye. and i'm talking about light and dark, not colors.
post #55 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by redshifter View Post
i checked out those "simulators". the "enhanced" painting for cb people looks waaay off to my eye. and i'm talking about light and dark, not colors.
That's sort of the point though. They want to somehow take the full visual light spectrum and compress it into two thirds of the spectrum. They do this partly by adjusting the colors and partly by adjusting the brightness. There's obviously no perfect way to do this -- it's inherently lossy -- but the point is to make details like the road in the hilly image more visible, not necessarily more realistic.
post #56 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanY View Post
That's sort of the point though. They want to somehow take the full visual light spectrum and compress it into two thirds of the spectrum. They do this partly by adjusting the colors and partly by adjusting the brightness. There's obviously no perfect way to do this -- it's inherently lossy -- but the point is to make details like the road in the hilly image more visible, not necessarily more realistic.
hmm. i see the point in say a color-coded spreadsheet. but for art? no way.
post #57 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhythmicmoose View Post
I've got red-green colorblindness (or "color discrimination deficiency" if you don't want to confuse people who don't understand that it's not really colorblindness).
No, then they just think you're a racist.


I can see colours fine. I also have an excellent sense of smell.
post #58 of 82
Sorry to re-surrect this thread guys, however I need to rant and I hate opening a new thread for it.
Due to my red-green deficiency, I really hate when I have to charge battery (DS lite, Digital Camera, etc) They're using green & red as indicator and I can't tell the difference.
I also can't tell the difference between brown & green. Once I told my friends about their 'green' dogs. They look at me funny, knew right away I got problem w/ color and start testing me
post #59 of 82
i can see the numbers in the first posts images, but i sometimes have trouble telling if a garment is black or blue, most happened between those two colours.

like if its black i might think its dark blue, and vice versa, only with some shades though i can tell the difference between a definite blue and a definite black.

perhaps thats normal, i dont know!
post #60 of 82
Chalk me up as another person who can't see the numbers in those damn plates. Fortunately, my red-green colour deficiency is mild enough to have never been an issue in real life - although I do tend to have to give dark brown and dark green things a very hard look to figure out what colour they actually are.

Still bugs the hell out of me when people blow it out ridiculously of proportion on the odd times that I've brought it up - I can see just fine, thanks.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › Team colourblind: are you in it?