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Storage for my music - Page 2

post #16 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedxing
Any enclosure will do as long you get the correct connectors. I also suggest getting at least a 7200 RPM drive if it has a 3.5" form factor.
Old enclosures don't support large drives.
Why would RPMs matter?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cid
best to keep a DVD back up of everything
DVD die too. If you keep two separate hard drives with a copy of everything, you can replace them as they die (you'd have to be *really* unlucky to have both die at the same time as your working copy). How do you manage hundreds of aging DVDs?

Quote:
Originally Posted by feckn_eejit
If I go back to using a computer as source, there will be RAID involved, period.
RAID doesn't replace backups. If you don't backup, chances are you will lose data again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmmtn4aj
Bad idea. Hard drives are devices which rely on the precision and condition of moving parts to function, and because of that the average lifespan decreases considerably the more it is used.
We're not talking about hard drives for servers but for backups. How many years of experience do you have with backups on hard drives?
post #17 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by HFat View Post
We're not talking about hard drives for servers but for backups. How many years of experience do you have with backups on hard drives?
My backup hard disks are always running along with the ones they're backing up, for the purpose of backing up in real time. If he isn't planning to use it that way.. *shrugs*
post #18 of 34
Yeah, new hard drives are preferable in that case... then again, I wouldn't use USB (or similar) external enclosures for that either.
I hope he's not planning to do that because mirroring does not replace backups (in most cases anyway).
post #19 of 34
What about e-SATA drives?
post #20 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by HFat View Post
DVD die too. If you keep two separate hard drives with a copy of everything, you can replace them as they die (you'd have to be *really* unlucky to have both die at the same time as your working copy). How do you manage hundreds of aging DVDs?
Yeah, that's true, but I find that DVD's in general last a lot longer. I must admit that's the major drawback with DVD's, keeping them organized and getting to what you want is a major pain in the ass. I keep an excel file which lists what music/anime/whatever is on what DVD, I just label the DVD's as numbers. I just use jewel cases so they last a bit longer as CD books tend to scratch them or so I've noticed. Well it works for me, but I hope something easier to maintain comes along.
post #21 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cid
Yeah, that's true, but I find that DVD's in general last a lot longer.
How did you "find" that?
I ask because I haven't had a single backup drive failure since DVD burners became affordable. And, as discussed before, I often use fairly old second-hand drives. I used to have drive failures with really old drives (too small to be useful nowadays) but all the drives failures I've witnessed in the last few years have been workstation/laptop/server drives.
If DVDs indeed lasted longer, I could have a use for them. I wouldn't be surprised but I don't have enough experience with DVDs to know for sure. It's what I have read that scared me... specifically, that burned DVDs, like burned CDs, tend to slowly develop small errors. I've certainly experienced this with CDs. OTOH, backup hard drives tend to fail totally and without warning (well, the old ones that failed me years ago did that anyway) which is a good thing because then you know they're broken. With DVDs, you'd have to read the whole content and checksum it from time to time to make sure that all the data's still there if you want to use them for long-term storage. I guess it's also good practice to do that with hard drives but it'd be a lot faster if you've got hundreds of GBs that you want to store for the long haul, isn't it? Or maybe I'm missing something?
post #22 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by HFat View Post
How did you "find" that?
I ask because I haven't had a single backup drive failure since DVD burners became affordable. And, as discussed before, I often use fairly old second-hand drives. I used to have drive failures with really old drives (too small to be useful nowadays) but all the drives failures I've witnessed in the last few years have been workstation/laptop/server drives.
If DVDs indeed lasted longer, I could have a use for them. I wouldn't be surprised but I don't have enough experience with DVDs to know for sure. It's what I have read that scared me... specifically, that burned DVDs, like burned CDs, tend to slowly develop small errors. I've certainly experienced this with CDs. OTOH, backup hard drives tend to fail totally and without warning (well, the old ones that failed me years ago did that anyway) which is a good thing because then you know they're broken. With DVDs, you'd have to read the whole content and checksum it from time to time to make sure that all the data's still there if you want to use them for long-term storage. I guess it's also good practice to do that with hard drives but it'd be a lot faster if you've got hundreds of GBs that you want to store for the long haul, isn't it? Or maybe I'm missing something?
I've been doing this for years, after having quite a few drives die on me and losing everything. It might just be bad luck, but I didn't want to take the risk again. If you keep them scratch free I don't see why errors would show up, I have my dads music collection which contains mostly stuff from the 80's and I've never had a problem with any of the disks. I don't know, it'd seem like such a waste to change my ways of storing my files now.
post #23 of 34
The theory is the stuff that's within discs on which burners can "write" deteriorates with time, more so with exposure to heat and such. Pressed CDs are supposed to last a good bit longer (like vinyl I suppose).
If you have hundreds of discs which are several years old, it would be interesting to know if all of them still checksum right. It's certainly possible as good ones are supposed to last many years.
post #24 of 34
i store my music on a 5x320GB RAID5 setup (1.2TB)

granted it doesn't replace backups, it's much safer than RAID0 and less space consuming than RAID1
post #25 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by HFat View Post
No. There's no point in buying brand names: they all do the same thing.
Just buy whatever's cheapest for you except perhaps for 3.5'' enclosures... if you don't know which ones are any good, buy from a reputable shop that sells computer parts to pros and amateurs.
I have to disagree with the statement that brand doesnt matter. i dont have a whole lot of experience but taken into account the limited lifespan of hard drives i think its important. i have a maxtor 160gb hard drive wich i bought a little more than a year ago and its starting to make really loud clicking sounds. louder than all of the fans and it keeps getting louder. im only waiting for it to die and start fighting for a warranty replacement. i probably have bad luck and it doesnt make a big difference but id still keep it in the back of my mind when making decisions.

*edit* i forgot to mention that the hard drive has a 3 year manufacturer warranty, it hasnt even been half that time so yea, you see my point.
post #26 of 34
Keep away from maxtor as far as harddrives are concerned. I've had 3 die on me! In a very short period of time aswell, my friends have had similiar expierences with maxtor drives. Seagate on the other hand have been working very nice for me so far and really quiet too. :P
post #27 of 34
I hate to perpetuate what is essentially superstition (I've never seen a proof and I haven't experience a statistically significant amount of failures) but, to be honest, I have the same brand bias. ;-)
That said, I only care for disks that are going to be on-line a lot. For backups or offline storage, I'll happily go with Maxtor or even with that other brand.
post #28 of 34
i agree that for a backup it probably wont make much of a difference. but if the op finds two similar hd's for similar price i would consider brand as the kicker.
post #29 of 34
Redundancy is king. I keep a directory of my FLAC and MP3/AAC files on 2 computers, and a USB HD to transfer/sync the 2 computers. As well, I back up my office computer on the corporate NAS. (4 copies of the the 2 directories)
post #30 of 34
Do the people in charge know about this? Redundancy sure is nice but there's this sticky at the top of the forum... if it wasn't for that, we would all backup our music Torvalds-style. It'd be more convenient and especially safer (not to mention cheaper) than anything proposed so far on this thread. I'm sure your employer's network is faster though and I don't suppose you're paying for it. ;-)
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