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Pink noise works wonders for burning-in!

post #1 of 353
Thread Starter 
I always burned-in my stuff simply by playing music at a slightly higher than normal volume...
Then some days ago a friend of mine who's into high-end speakers told me that several high-end speaker manufactures do a factory burn-in on their products prior shipping, and they use pink noise to accomplish this task.

Since headphones are nothing but miniaturized speakers I got my hands on a pink noise sample and tried it on my HD650s... It worked wonders!!!
I had been playing music for 51 hours on the cans and was quite satisfied with how they were performing. Then I left them playing pink noise overnight (9 hours) and OMG they opened up much more. (I never thought a headphone could sound like this, guess I was underestimating the 650s)

I would say those 9 hours of pink noise opened the cans much more than the previous 51 hours of music... After the pink noise stretch everything was sooo much better, especially overall clarity, microdetails, and treble performance... It was like discovering the hidden potential of the HD650. Stunning.

As an added bonus pink noise is easier to deal with at night when you put your cans into a drawer, it is drowned out easier than music at the same volume.

So, who else here used/uses pink noise to burn his cans? I'm fairly impressed!
post #2 of 353
Pink Noise is a mixture of all frequencies at the same time and level, that is the best noise and the more critical sound that could reach any driver, it is widely used in the pro industry for that purpose and for measuring purposes, there is one CD that MCM used to sell that inlcude several tracks that could be used for the purpose...

For speakers for example, some sites recommned, to use it in opposed phase, reversing the polarity in one of them, and placing both speakers one in front of the other to minimize the disgusting sound, the same could be used in heapdhones inverting the feeding cable in one channel. IIRC Pink Floyd use to have one sample in his website of one compilation he made of some sampled tones that was also very useful...
post #3 of 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Hunter View Post
I always burned-in my stuff simply by playing music at a slightly higher than normal volume...
Then some days ago a friend of mine who's into high-end speakers told me that several high-end speaker manufactures do a factory burn-in on their products prior shipping, and they use pink noise to accomplish this task.

Since headphones are nothing but miniaturized speakers I got my hands on a pink noise sample and tried it on my HD650s... It worked wonders!!!
I had been playing music for 51 hours on the cans and was quite satisfied with how they were performing. Then I left them playing pink noise overnight (9 hours) and OMG they opened up much more. (I never thought a headphone could sound like this, guess I was underestimating the 650s)

I would say those 9 hours of pink noise opened the cans much more than the previous 51 hours of music... After the pink noise stretch everything was sooo much better, especially overall clarity, microdetails, and treble performance... It was like discovering the hidden potential of the HD650. Stunning.

As an added bonus pink noise is easier to deal with at night when you put your cans into a drawer, it is drowned out easier than music at the same volume.

So, who else here used/uses pink noise to burn his cans? I'm fairly impressed!
Where might one get a sample? I have some new headphones (hd595) that need some love.
post #4 of 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spookykinkajou View Post
Where might one get a sample? I have some new headphones (hd595) that need some love.
X2... I could seriously use this the next time I buy a pair of headphones.
post #5 of 353
post #6 of 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spookykinkajou View Post
Where might one get a sample? I have some new headphones (hd595) that need some love.
X3... I'll be able to use it on my MS1's when (if) the arrive

Edit: Oh. Damn my slow typing . Thanks!
post #7 of 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by fraseyboy View Post
X3... I'll be able to use it on my MS1's when (if) the arrive

Edit: Oh. Damn my slow typing . Thanks!
If you have a mac and OS X I just found a simple program. I've yet to hear another source of pink noise so I don't know if this is the same, but I've installed and am playing it now and it's producing a sound through the 'phones that I suspect is the same.

It's also free, unlike the other link.

http://www.blackholemedia.com/noise/
post #8 of 353
I always use pink noise to burn in my headphones, nothing works like it.
post #9 of 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spookykinkajou View Post
It's also free, unlike the other link.
You can download a free 15 second Pink Noise sample from the other link, or pay more for a full 15 minute version.
post #10 of 353
Room EQ Wizard has a built-in pink noise and sine wave generator: http://www.hometheatershack.com/roomeq/
post #11 of 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sovkiller View Post
Does it matter the quality of the pink noise? For example, would a lossless version of pink noise burn in headphones better than a lower quality compression? The sample sounds like it was less than 128kps MP3....

EDIT: Forget that website, I'm not paying 5 bucks for 15 minutes of pink noise.
post #12 of 353
the free audio package has a pink noise generator. from this you can also aply filters to create other colors of noise if you so desire.

you can also layer solid or sweep tones into the pink noise.
post #13 of 353
I had a Audio Control C101 EQ. It had a pink noise generator to feed a mic for calibrating speakers to listening levels. Several receivers and preamps have it for the same purpose, to setup surround speaker volume levels. It does the best for break-in IMHO. I agree, it is easier to mask than music. Don't know how you could reverse polarity the L/R headphones though.

Went to the Martin-Logan factory on a tour before buying. A room set up with 20 sets of speakers breaking in with pink noise. You walk in front of a speaker, loud. They walk you down the middle of the room and talk normally. Sounded like a light breeze. Pretty cool.

It is packed away but I believe several A/V calibration discs has this and other patterns as well. 24 hz, 60 hz, etc. If you have a powered sub, feed it with this and put a lighter in front of the woofer. It will blow matches out. Some lighters too.

Edit: Don't use bass sweeps on headphones. If you do, low volume and short periods. (But you want to hear what a headphone's thumpability is.......)
post #14 of 353
Would this help IEMs, i.e. Super Fi 5s?
post #15 of 353
Does is matter what source you use to how good the effectiveness of burning in is?
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