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If you were to buy a TV now, which technology would you buy into? - Page 2

post #16 of 116
Well what I just bought a couple of months ago: an EDTV plasma, see why here, post #11, and also here (some highly recommended links there).

It's a 42", watching it from about 9 feet. Simply awesome image quality, particularly for DVDs or the PS2, cable TV also looks great actually.

EDTV is not necessarily the best for people in the US, or in general, for people with a lot of HD programming offerings. But if you don't have much HD programming in your location, an EDTV plasma is an excellent value, way happy with it.

Happy New Year btw!
post #17 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rock&Roll Ninja View Post
If I had to buy a new HDTV today I'd pay $750 for a 34" Sony CRT and live with it for 5 - 10 years while digital technology picture quality improves, prices drop, and HDCP "handshaking" issues are worked out.

PS: I'm also waiting on HD content. Why should I buy an HDTV when only 6 out of the 250 channels on cable have HD content?
Fully agree. I still think a nice 34" CRT widescreen beats anything out there right now. I would go HD though - DVDs and HD gaming are here now and are plentiful.
post #18 of 116
my parents bought a sony xbr2, you really dont notice the blacklight really. its way better then any other LCD or plasma i've seen. plus, it gets zero glare.
post #19 of 116
I bought a Panasonic plasma a little over a year ago. I don't know....HDTV and DVDs look pretty life like to me (especially HDMI input): projection suffers from poor gamma and interpolation issues. Of course there's the price issue: plasma and LCD are coming down in price so that projection might not be as viable.

as for resolution, I wouldn't worry with having 1080p: no HDTV channel has that. They are either 720p or 1080i. I guess some hi-res DVDs might have 1080p (think Blue-Ray and HD-DVD might support it). But the differences in detail start becoming miniscule at that point.

LCD and Plasma are getting to be pretty reliable now. New plasmas are supposed to be better with burn in issues, and are supposed to last a lot longer. I decided to go with one for my main viewing TV because of the ability to have a wide viewing angle.
post #20 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by blinx View Post
my parents bought a sony xbr2, you really dont notice the blacklight really. its way better then any other LCD or plasma i've seen. plus, it gets zero glare.
I also have an XBR2. It is very nice and probably the best LCD I have seen, but the PQ just doesn't compare to my TH-65PF9UK.
post #21 of 116
I bought Sony CRT 36XS955 last year. It's an excellent set to keep me occupied until SED tech come out. It's also a perfect set to play last gen console games, however I prefer to watch movies on my parent's 42 inch sony plasma 42XS955. My CRT got a better picture but I prefer to watch movies on a larger screen size. The next set I'll buy, it has to be at least 50 inch, more is better and I'll wait and see how SED quality will be. For plasma vs lcd, I prefer plasma, LCD picture seems to vivid and brighter to my taste.
post #22 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleestack View Post
I also have an XBR2. It is very nice and probably the best LCD I have seen, but the PQ just doesn't compare to my TH-65PF9UK.
hah, i regret selling my xbox 360, i really want that 200 dollar HD-dvd drive
post #23 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davesrose View Post

as for resolution, I wouldn't worry with having 1080p: no HDTV channel has that. They are either 720p or 1080i. I guess some hi-res DVDs might have 1080p (think Blue-Ray and HD-DVD might support it). But the differences in detail start becoming miniscule at that point.
It really depends on your TV size and viewing distance. On my 65" panel at my 8'-10' viewing distance I would simply not be ble to get the same clarity with a non 1080p panel. I do realize, however that I am an early adopter and paying the premium for 1080p isn't necessarily the best choice for many people.
post #24 of 116
When you're talking about the resolutions 720p/1080i/1080p, just be sure you know...

There is input capability, meaning what the max resolution an input signal can have...you of course need sources capable of matching your max or you won't see the benefit.

There is output capability. This depends on whatever the light engine is for the given set.

My set at 42" and 3LCD type, can only display 720p, but can handle a 1080i input source, it simply downsamples it to output at 720p.

A lot of people cross that difference up , or spend for 1080p without having sources that will actually produce that output...or that upscale to it from a lower res original signal anyway.
post #25 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsqueak View Post
When you're talking about the resolutions 720p/1080i/1080p, just be sure you know...

There is input capability, meaning what the max resolution an input signal can have...you of course need sources capable of matching your max or you won't see the benefit.

There is output capability. This depends on whatever the light engine is for the given set.

My set at 42" and 3LCD type, can only display 720p, but can handle a 1080i input source, it simply downsamples it to output at 720p.

A lot of people cross that difference up , or spend for 1080p without having sources that will actually produce that output...or that upscale to it from a lower res original signal anyway.
People should also understand where the scaling is happening and where it should happen. Personally, I think very few TVs, if any, have internal processors that can match the quality of a good external processor. I prefer feeding my 1080p sets with a 1080p signal, even if that signal has been upscaled via an external scaler (i.e the one in my 5910ci). Of course it doesn't look as good as material fed from my Blu-ray player.

I do think feeding a 1080p set with a 1080p signal that has been upscaled from 480p via good external scaler will produce a better image than letting the TV/projector do the scaling. Of course, that is not universally true and depends on the specific equipment being used. You definitely won't get Blu-ray or HD-DVD quality using an upscaled DVD, but you can get different picture quality depending on which scaler you use.
post #26 of 116
Quote:
If I had to buy a new HDTV today I'd pay $750 for a 34" Sony CRT and live with it for 5 - 10 years while digital technology picture quality improves, prices drop, and HDCP "handshaking" issues are worked out.
I bought my TV about a year ago. I bought a Sony CRT widescreen, and I still don't regret it. I love the black levels, resolution versatility and reliability. My only beef with CRTs is size/energy, and the fact that there aren't any of them anymore.
post #27 of 116
I like LCD better because it dosn't get dimmer over time, they last forever and they don't suffer from burn in. The black levels are just fine on newer ones and personally I never even noticed a problem with the older ones until I read about it.
post #28 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleestack View Post
It really depends on your TV size and viewing distance. On my 65" panel at my 8'-10' viewing distance I would simply not be ble to get the same clarity with a non 1080p panel. I do realize, however that I am an early adopter and paying the premium for 1080p isn't necessarily the best choice for many people.
Well I don't need a larger one then 50" because I'm in an apartment. You probably can see a larger difference between 1080i and 1080p with a 65", but I suspect it's similar to 480i vs 480p: very subtle and not as impactful as going up to 720i. Since you're purely 1080p then, I assume you've gotten into Blue-Ray or HD-DVD? You can't get 1080p on HDTV.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 003 View Post
I like LCD better because it dosn't get dimmer over time, they last forever and they don't suffer from burn in. The black levels are just fine on newer ones and personally I never even noticed a problem with the older ones until I read about it.
New plasma screens don't have the burn issues anymore. The actual lifespan of the pixels is similar to the lifespane of LCD's backlight. Plasma actually has a longer theoritical life then CRT: 30,000-60,000(new Plasmas like mine are rated closer to 60,000) hours half life while CRT has 25,000! So LCD really isn't more durable then plasma. For large screens, I like plasma, but for small screens, I go for LCD (they can get a crisper image at the expense of color saturation).

http://www.flattvpeople.com/tutorials/lcd-vs-plasma.asp
post #29 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davesrose View Post
Well I don't need a larger one then 50" because I'm in an apartment. You probably can see a larger difference between 1080i and 1080p with a 65", but I suspect it's similar to 480i vs 480p: very subtle and not as impactful as going up to 720i. Since you're purely 1080p then, I assume you've gotten into Blue-Ray or HD-DVD? You can't get 1080p on HDTV.
I don't recommend people to spend money on 1080p below 50".

On a 65" the difference is huge, but the biggest difference is that you can sit 5' from the 65" with perfect resolution. At viewing distances of 13' or more, the difference is subtle. I sit at 8'.

Yes, I use Blu-ray and just picked up HD-DVD.
post #30 of 116
I just picked up a panasonic TH-42px60u plasma for my bedroom for $1299.00 today.
I was looking at the Sony 32 xbr2 but the price for the 42 "panasonic was actually less.
I have to pickup a High def cable box from the cable company,definately need to look in to how to calibrate the Tv.
I have the Video essential DVD,any tips?I will check out AVs forums.
Also waiting on the Blue-Ray,HD dvd war,before deciding which one to jump on.
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