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Gilmore Dynamic - DIY Headwise Project

post #1 of 2
Thread Starter 
Hi

Getting back into Electronics/Audio and on designing the PCB for the Gilmore Dynamic Headphone Amplifier.

A few questions! Ive noticed on the Gilmore Website for the Kit/Ready Made units the PCBs have a variable Potentiometer - http://www.headamp.com/home_amps/lit..._board_med.jpg
any ideas what this is for compared to the circuit posted here http://headwize.com/projects/showfil...lmore3_prj.htm

Also any ideas what the new equivanlents will be for 2SC1815/2SA1015/2SK389/2SJ109 transistors?

Any one built one of these units and did they have any problems with settingup/servo unit etc.

Regards and thanks in advance.

John
post #2 of 2
The 4 VRs at the back is a new feature on updated versions of the circuit, it allows for manual trimming of the offset, which compensates for slightly unmatched parts. The big Pot in the front is the volume control, which you wire on before the input.

IMO, the Dynalo is designed 4 years ago and includes some obsolete parts (the 2SK389/2SJ109 is discontinued and next to impossible to find these days). A better thing to design PCBs for in terms of solid state headamps would be the updated Kumisa III, the Beta22, or Gilmore's new GBF dyna. These three are the current cutting-edge of solid state amps, and is potentially much easier to source for than the original Dynalo design. They would also almost certainly sound better than a vanilla Dynalo, although that's not to say that the Dynalo sounds even half bad. It's just that these projects are definitely playing in the same league as the legendary Dynalo.

Detailed information about these projects can all be found in the Headwize DIY discussion forum.
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