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post #16 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayG View Post
Not really. Even if you like what Gould does with Bach's music, he's a terrible recommendation for a first recording of any given piece.

-Jay
True - depending on your leanings, he can either be 'gifted' or 'mannered'.
post #17 of 71
Tyson,

You love Pierre Fournier; don't you think it's about time you learned how to spell his name?

Also, I'm surprised that you haven't put the Fournier/Kempf Beethoven: Music for Cello and Piano on the list as well.
post #18 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears View Post
Tyson,

You love Pierre Fournier; don't you think it's about time you learned how to spell his name?

Also, I'm surprised that you haven't put the Flournier/Kempf Beethoven: Music for Cello and Piano on the list as well.
Oops, typo. Fixed now, thanks. I also love his Beethoven Cello Sonatas, but I'm trying to keep the list pared down to the essentials of essentials, and so some things just don't quite make the list.
post #19 of 71
I am curious about what made you choose Angela Hewitt for the Goldberg Variations as opposed to Glenn Gould, I like her version of the Bach Piano Concertos, but I guess for me Glenn Gould was the man who started my love for classical music. So maybe I am just partial, it is by far the more popular version though.

But a great list overall, gives me some ideas for future purchases.
post #20 of 71
Thread Starter 
I have all of Gould's recordings and in each case I prefer Hewitt. I prefer her cooler, more layered architectural approach to Gould's alternately hyperactive and ponderous approach.
post #21 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcsamms View Post
I am curious about what made you choose Angela Hewitt for the Goldberg Variations as opposed to Glenn Gould, I like her version of the Bach Piano Concertos, but I guess for me Glenn Gould was the man who started my love for classical music. So maybe I am just partial, it is by far the more popular version though.

But a great list overall, gives me some ideas for future purchases.
Because Gould's performances are pretty far from what Bach wrote. I'm not saying his interpretations are bad or not valid; I'm just saying that when you listen to Gould play Bach, it's sometimes hard to hear Bach. It's never difficult to hear Gould.

-Jay
post #22 of 71
The Bach Double Violin Concerto is exceeding great. Or at least when the Scottish Ensemble and Rees do it
post #23 of 71
add more:

Strauss: Ein Heldenleben
Bernstein: Candid Overture
Elgar: Enigma Variations
Stravinsky: Petrushka, firebird suite and rite of spring

Maybe some opera or medieval music like gregorian chant or monteverdi
post #24 of 71
Tyson,

Can you also comment on the technical aspects of the recordings? I would like to build a library, but would like to find versions with fine performances that are also well recorded. Thanks.
post #25 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyson View Post
Oops, typo. Fixed now, thanks. I also love his Beethoven Cello Sonatas, but I'm trying to keep the list pared down to the essentials of essentials, and so some things just don't quite make the list.
I think perhaps you should include one work by Ives on the list. I know you want to keep it short, but I've been listening to Ives and have really come to think that he should be on everyone's list of important 20th century composers.


post #26 of 71
nice list tyson.

if i may suggest an alternative complete beethoven string quartet on a budget: alan berg quartet $28.97 this is a nicely packaged set and the performance and recording are top notch.
post #27 of 71
Nice list. I disagree with HH on Brahms violin concerto; she is too soft and lacks energy. Mutter has more electronvolts, if you want a woman playing it. But this is all a matter of taste. I am trying hard to like the postimpressionism music and Bruckner (don't really know where he is). I must be a bit primitive, but the lack of melody and structure takes the pleasure away from listening, and to me, this is the centerpoint of art, beauty creating pleasure. Shostakovich seems to be the exception; his music touches some crazy emotional fiber inside you that makes me wonder if I like it, but I find it very interesting.
post #28 of 71
very nice list. I just started getting into classical music and this thread will undoubtedly help me along the journey. Thanks!
post #29 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by K2Grey View Post
Are there any other Brandenburgs that you would recommend? I was looking to get a set of Brandenburgs, and was going to get Britten since I didn't really like the tempo of many of the HIP ones like Pinnock. But I like what I'm hearing with Rees despite how no one seems to recommend it (no one bashes it either, though, so I guess it's just unknown).
Try Pau (Pablo) Casals recording of 1969, Brandenburg Concertos, 2CDs CBS, whith the Marlboro Festival Orchestra. With classical instruments, so lively and yet correct. Very fitting as a beginners as well as melomans version.
post #30 of 71
Very nice list, thank you!
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