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Tea-Fi? - Page 4

post #46 of 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder
Does it matter when you consume the tea? If they were picked during Spring, that would mean that it's been picked quite a few months ago! Is Darjeeling meant to be aged?

I was in a tea shop a couple months back and the owner said that some teas are meant to be consumed asap for the best taste.
Fresher is better -- though this tea still holds up rather nicely for a good while. I'm not a Darjeeling expert so there's not much I can say, other than from my limited experience.
post #47 of 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romanee
Fresher is better -- though this tea still holds up rather nicely for a good while. I'm not a Darjeeling expert so there's not much I can say, other than from my limited experience.
Exactly what I was thinking. Better wait for the 2007 batch!
post #48 of 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder
Exactly what I was thinking. Better wait for the 2007 batch!
I'll probably have to wait that long anyway. Might have to go to London to buy some.

I can still conjure up in my mind the subtle yet thrilling aroma rising as the box lid and foil liner open...... Ahhhhh. A peaceful smile spreads and my cheeks rise up towards my lidded eyes. A lovely little meditation.
post #49 of 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder
How do you prepare Gyokoru tea? I'm interested in trying some new stuff.
Here's a link to one set that gives some worthwhile info, though not quite enough:

brewing Gyokuro

An important, added note from another site:

"High-quality Gyokuro will yield up to 3 flavorful infusions. Since the first infusion has allowed the leaves to open up, brew the second infusion for a much shorter time (around 30 seconds) and the third infusion for about 60 seconds."
post #50 of 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romanee
Here's a link to one set that gives some worthwhile info, though not quite enough:

brewing Gyokuro

An important, added note from another site:

"High-quality Gyokuro will yield up to 3 flavorful infusions. Since the first infusion has allowed the leaves to open up, brew the second infusion for a much shorter time (around 30 seconds) and the third infusion for about 60 seconds."
Thanks! That's a hell of a lot of preparation. I simply don't have all the "gear" to maximise the "performance" of the Gyokuro. It might be a bit of a waste...
post #51 of 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romanee
My wife and I have loved this tea for years. We'd pick up 2 or 3 boxes when we visited London, and sometimes ordered by phone. A few years crops came in beautiful mahogany-looking wood boxes, but this year's looks like a less luxurious, simple white wood box. Doesn't affect the tea's taste, but not as much fun to handle. I wonder how the 2006 is. Has anyone tried it yet?

Sadly, I discovered today this notice when I checked "delivery" info at the F&M site: "Due to a new FDA legislation - US BIOTERRORISM ACT - we can no longer deliver food products to mainland USA from the UK."!!!

The F&M USA website does not show the First Flush Darjeeling as available for purchase here.

Gyokuro (noted above by mcsamms in post #39) is a very intense and delicious green tea (very stimulating).

There are also many fragrant and flavorful "shin-cha" (each current season's fresh green teas), some first flush green teas, "monkey pick" selected most delicate tips, matcha (powdered green tea used in tea ceremonies - bright green and made frothy with a bamboo whisk)

Somehow, despite our love for various green teas, we always crave the lovely aroma, delicate taste and beautiful color of F&M's First Flush Darjeeling.
I am not sure what you where paying for that tea, but considering the conversion of English pound and shipping I would think you could find a comparable if not better First Flush Darjeeling at Upton tea importers.
post #52 of 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder
I LOVE Iron Goddess.
Thats very good news.

Quote:
Pu-erh (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea) is also very nice and by far the most expensive type of tea
I had a look at the wiki entry. I thought I knew a lot about tea but I have never seen aged tea before. You are truly a tea master...

Quote:
Have you ever tried Long Jin? It's quite nice too and a popular choice for Dim Sum goers in Hong Kong.
No. But I would like to try to other varities of Iron Goddess if you have any more information?
post #53 of 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by c0mfortably_numb
I am not sure what you where paying for that tea, but considering the conversion of English pound and shipping I would think you could find a comparable if not better First Flush Darjeeling at Upton tea importers.
I expect to learn more about -- and try more First Flush Darjeelings. F&M's First Flush is £21 (approx. $40) for 250 grams in a wood box. Upton's 4 First Flush sampler tins (35g each) is $28 for 140 grams total.

Thanks for the link.
post #54 of 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romanee


Sadly, I discovered today this notice when I checked "delivery" info at the F&M site: "Due to a new FDA legislation - US BIOTERRORISM ACT - we can no longer deliver food products to mainland USA from the UK."!!!
Bioterror-That cracked me. Seriously though, that looks like good tea.
post #55 of 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder
Thanks! That's a hell of a lot of preparation. I simply don't have all the "gear" to maximise the "performance" of the Gyokuro. It might be a bit of a waste...
All you really need is a nice little (preferrably good Japanese) teapot, nice little tea cups, warm the pot and cups with boiled-and-slightly-cooled water, empty the pot, put leaves in pot, pour little cups "full" of slightly more cooled water into the pot with leaves, steep approx. 2 minutes, pour gently into cups, and enjoy. You can get a good sense of how much to let the boiled water cool with a little practice. Certainly no steam coming off the water, and preferrably 50-60 Celsius (or 120-140 Fahrenheit) -- well below boiling, but certainly not lukewarm.

After the first pot the leaves will have opened, and the 2nd infusion will get strong very quickly, so no more than 30 seconds or so.

The third pot takes a bit longer -- about a minute.

Again, I'm not a tea master by any means (just a hack who likes green teas), but it's not so challenging -- unless you do wish to develop your art of tea (Chanoyu).

Chanoyu - Tea Ceremony - Hot Water For Tea...
post #56 of 633
This discussion reminds me of a cafe not too far up from where I live that's run by Moby...

My little brother is a tea snob. His favorite kind of tea smells like - I swear - burnt tires. I'll take coffee any day
post #57 of 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiliman
+1

I'm partial to Genmai Cha mmmm toasty

post #58 of 633
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romanee
50-60 Celsius (or 120-140 Fahrenheit) -- well below boiling, but certainly not lukewarm.
Yes. Not using boiling water is so important else you risk cooking one's pricy tea leaves; locking in the flavor inside forever.
post #59 of 633
Have any of you ever had yansoon tea? (tea made with anise seeds)

I find that is is wonderful when blended with some fresh mint and a bit of ceylon
post #60 of 633
I love Earl Grey! The best I've ever had is from Fortnum & Mason.

In a close second place would have to be Moroccan Mint Green Tea. Delicious hot or iced.
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