New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tea-Fi? - Page 22

post #316 of 644
Have you tried rooibos espresso? When I lived in Windhoek it was all the rage in the coffee houses.

post #317 of 644

Have a chinese supermarket about 10 minutes away from me so I can buy so much chinese tea. 

Had a fun incident with it when I started Uni. We had a surprise inspection after my neighbour was found dealing drugs. Took quite a while to convince them my shelf full of dried leaves was in fact tea and not drugs. 

post #318 of 644

how does it work?  from the picture, it looks like you simply put pure roobios into the portafilter?  or do you mix it with coffee?  looks like something i'd want to try out on my machine! 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pudu View Post

Have you tried rooibos espresso? When I lived in Windhoek it was all the rage in the coffee houses.

post #319 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by El_Doug View Post

how does it work?  from the picture, it looks like you simply put pure roobios into the portafilter?  or do you mix it with coffee?  looks like something i'd want to try out on my machine! 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pudu View Post

Have you tried rooibos espresso? When I lived in Windhoek it was all the rage in the coffee houses.

What machine? And I'm guessing its like any ordaniry tea.

post #320 of 644

Rooibos espresso is made by putting rooibos into a pressurized "espresso" portafilter. If you use a traditional espresso portafilter the rooibos won't make enough resistance to the water to work properly and it will underextract.

 

also I think if rooibos counts as tea then coffee is tea too xD

post #321 of 644

Dragon Oolong , say no more!!! :D
 


Edited by Urbex Girl - 2/20/13 at 1:54am
post #322 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikkihasclaws View Post

Rooibos espresso is made by putting rooibos into a pressurized "espresso" portafilter. If you use a traditional espresso portafilter the rooibos won't make enough resistance to the water to work properly and it will underextract.

 

also I think if rooibos counts as tea then coffee is tea too xD

Actually, rooibos ("red bush") is not tea, in nickname only. Does not originate from the tea plant, but rather a shrub like bush in South Africa from the legume family.

post #323 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post

Actually, rooibos ("red bush") is not tea, in nickname only. Does not originate from the tea plant, but rather a shrub like bush in South Africa from the legume family.


That's what I was getting at when I said that if rooibos counts as tea then coffee is tea too :)

post #324 of 644

Yes. My aim was at the general readership...thanks for the platform.normal_smile%20.gif Maybe I should enhance my signature to read: "Waiting in the dark...for tea."


Edited by Silent One - 2/17/13 at 7:55pm
post #325 of 644

I'm drinking tea in hi-fi tonight :)

 

2003 Tai Lian Yiwu brick brewed in a 50ml zini yixing clay pot and served in a 70ml jing de zhen porcelain cup :)

post #326 of 644

Is there a big difference between clay and ceramic? 

 

I need a new teapot lol

post #327 of 644
Usually ceramic is fired clay.
post #328 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikkihasclaws View Post

I'm drinking tea in hi-fi tonight :)

 

2003 Tai Lian Yiwu brick brewed in a 50ml zini yixing clay pot and served in a 70ml jing de zhen porcelain cup :)


blink.gif what she said?  ehmm... bless you Nikki :D lol

post #329 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pudu View Post

Usually ceramic is fired clay.

 

Clay is also porous so it picks up and keeps a flavor patina of the tea you brew.  With something like a yixing clay tea pot, you pretty much want to only brew one type of tea in it, and let it develop that residual tea flavor after many uses.  They are definitely fragile though.

post #330 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbex Girl View Post


blink.gif what she said?  ehmm... bless you Nikki :D lol


lol baby :D

 

About clay vs ceramic...clay is really a kind of ceramic but usually when pots are described as ceramic they have a glassy glaze over the clay and when pots are described as clay they are just the clay with no glassy glaze over the top. When the inside of teapots are not glazed then that means, like daigo said, that there is a porous surface for the tea to interact with which leads to the development of a patina that can positively affect future brews :)

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home