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Tea-Fi? - Page 2

post #16 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiliman
The IngenuiTea tea maker they sell is really great, they even have a video showing how it works, i really recommend them. http://www.adagio.com/teaware/ingenu...3bf2b475550404

Hmm. Perhaps I should buy this and the green tea sampler. Would this be a good intro into the Tea world?
post #17 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiliman
Is the 'proper way' for making Chinese tea different than making other types of loose-leaf tea?
Oh, you just have a lot more cups and tools. Also, the temperature of the water matters a lot. The preparation is different for different types of tea. The tea I drink is doesn't require any special preparation. That's why I use the ceramic mug. I know serious tea-drinkers who spend hundreds of dollars on tea and they have their own special tea sets for brewing tea
post #18 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder
Oh, you just have a lot more cups and tools. Also, the temperature of the water matters a lot. The preparation is different for different types of tea. The tea I drink is doesn't require any special preparation. That's why I use the ceramic mug. I know serious tea-drinkers who spend hundreds of dollars on tea and they have their own special tea sets for brewing tea
I have this special method for preparing chinese tea:

step 1: Place leaves in pot.

step 2: Pour boiling water into the pot.
post #19 of 644
Uptontea.com

My dad has been buying from them for several years now. They have a nice selection of teas ranging in price from cheap to expensive.

There's a fine art to tea brewing. Temperature is very important. Steeping time is important too.
post #20 of 644
Unfortunately, being a college student, the only way for me to get decent tea is with a microwave, bottled water, and Twinings Earl Grey and Breakfast teas.
post #21 of 644
My next tea pot purchase

Might I suggest this for reading whilst brewing & sipping:

The Book of Tea

Essentially it is about Japanese culture (sometimes vis a vis Western culture) as seen through the lens of tea and its accouterments. Certainly not bad for a quick read.

I purchased it from pati_robi, one of amazon's sellers (cheapest new price and in NY). I'd recommend her (no affiliation of course).

Anyone know of a similar read for Indian or Chinese tea rituals?

f/R
post #22 of 644
Ringtons is great, PG Tips is also a good one.
post #23 of 644
Drinking some tea myself right now...I came on here and did a search for "tea-fi" and sure enough...!

I actually just made oolong in what I was pretty close to the Chinese way. I have a yixing clay tea set, with an amazingly tiny tea pot, tiny cups, a bowl for bathing the tea pot in boiling water as the tea steeps, and . The whole process is about keeping the water extremely hot while the tea is steeping. Check out this site if you're interested:

http://chineseteas101.com/kungfu_2.htm

I do everything there (except I would like a drip tray!), except I usually just pour the multiple steepings all into one large tea cup. The small cups are great for sharing with friends though! The process is really kind of enjoyable, and watching the steam come off of the clay pot while its in its water bath is pretty calming.

This was the first time I'd made tea this way in months...I can't really drink hot tea until it's autumn, and then it's one of the things that helps me make it through the colder months!

If there's a Team Tea-Fi, can I join??

Edit: http://www.harney.com sells a good variety of teas, in loose leaf and bags. You sometimes see the bag tea for sale in cafes and places like Au Bon Pain (which I still can't pronounce right).
post #24 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dhw
Drinking some tea myself right now...I came on here and did a search for "tea-fi" and sure enough...!

I actually just made oolong in what I was pretty close to the Chinese way. I have a yixing clay tea set, with an amazingly tiny tea pot, tiny cups, a bowl for bathing the tea pot in boiling water as the tea steeps, and . The whole process is about keeping the water extremely hot while the tea is steeping. Check out this site if you're interested:

http://chineseteas101.com/kungfu_2.htm

I do everything there (except I would like a drip tray!), except I usually just pour the multiple steepings all into one large tea cup. The small cups are great for sharing with friends though! The process is really kind of enjoyable, and watching the steam come off of the clay pot while its in its water bath is pretty calming.

This was the first time I'd made tea this way in months...I can't really drink hot tea until it's autumn, and then it's one of the things that helps me make it through the colder months!

If there's a Team Tea-Fi, can I join??

Edit: http://www.harney.com sells a good variety of teas, in loose leaf and bags. You sometimes see the bag tea for sale in cafes and places like Au Bon Pain (which I still can't pronounce right).
That's how you do it!!! I like oolong too...
post #25 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarlicKnots
That may have to be mine as well! Great find...I wanted a tokoname kyusu for making green tea and that looks awesome...

Sadly, like headphones, tea can become yet another expensive hobby...maybe not as expensive (well, actually, if you look around, there are vintages of tea that are actually comparable). Tea pots are to headphones as tea is to new CDs
post #26 of 644
My favorite tea is chamomile with honey which really isn't a tea. I also enjoy different green teas, black teas, barley tea and anything made by Republic of Tea or Harney and Son's. I also drink alot of Lipton's cold brew tea.
post #27 of 644
Barley tea? That sounds like it could be pretty interesting...
post #28 of 644
I get my tea from a local place that has a great selection of loose leaf. I am quiet partial to jasmine, but I certainly don't limit myself to a single type. I'd like to try the old growth teas for sale here.

Most of the tea I drink is in the form of masala chai, which is generally made with assam.
post #29 of 644
Best place is Upton Tea, I been dealing with them since around 1997 The worst experience was with Adiago the tea I received was stale, and the plastic brewer is a joke, for brewing stick with Chatsford pots.
post #30 of 644
I got into loose-leaf tea last year, after dabbling with grocery store stuff for a few years. It's quite worth it

I get my tea from a great local place (https://camellia-sinensis.com/). What I like about this place is that you're actually informed where the tea you're buying specifically comes from, what month the harvest was in, etc... I prefer this to relying on brand names and ingredient lists which say something indescript like 'organic green tea' which can mean anything really.

I actually find high quality loose-leaf tea reasonably cheap per volume (for about $60 or so I can buy around 3 varieties to last me several months), and taste-wise I can't imagine going back Basically the same story as going back to $5 panasonics after hearing 650's.
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