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Tea-Fi? - Page 8

post #106 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder
The teashop that I go to in Hong Kong says that you only drink the second and third steeping. Apparently, the first steeping is used to wash the cup. What are your thoughts on this?
That's what I do...no complaints from me! A minute for the first steeping/rinse...then dump that out...then steep for a minute with really hot water (as close to boiling as you can maintain)...drink that...then steep again for one minute and 15 seconds...drink that...then, you can even steep again for 1 minute 30 and it still tastes good to me...

The taste really does subtly change each time...it's enjoyable!
post #107 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dhw
Ok, someone recommend me a good bubble tea chain or local Boston shop or just general flavor, because everytime I've had it, I've really wanted to like it, but it just hasn't done it for me yet (and I love iced tea)
are you asian? If you aren't, that might explain why
post #108 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oistrakh
are you asian? If you aren't, that might explain why
Haha...perhaps that is it. I've only tried it from Tealuxe in Boston, and am not a big fan of the flavor of the (tapioca?) pearls...though I love tapioca pudding (if the pearls aren't tapioca, then this will make even more sense).

I'll try out Chinatown to try one from there...maybe Tealuxe just makes lousy bubble tea...if I don't like it there, I'll probably just have to resign myself to not liking chewey tea...and not being asian (though still loving the non-bubble teas from Asia!)
post #109 of 644

Bubble tea

My view of bubble tea is that is while it definately belongs to the tea-fi thread I am more interested in traditional teas. For the record, I am not asian, tried it, and nearly choked. Definately something to put in the acquired taste category in my opinion. Like music, to each his own.

My view on the first steeping is to never drink it. I have not thought to use it for washing out my cup (but I do warm it, don't want to shock my tea!) but using it to wash the leaves from anything residue left over from the processing and shipping steps.

I became good friends with the manger of my local tea house and he had taken tours of tea processing facilities overseas. He said the places got pretty dusty. It is also rumored that the swept up tea on the floor is used in tea bags. Another reason to buy expensive tea.
post #110 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by wower
I became good friends with the manger of my local tea house and he had taken tours of tea processing facilities overseas. He said the places got pretty dusty. It is also rumored that the swept up tea on the floor is used in tea bags. Another reason to buy expensive tea.
I believe teas are sieved and the larger (whole leaves) get a higher grade and the fines are the lower grade used in tea bags.
post #111 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by hubcaps
I believe teas are sieved and the larger (whole leaves) get a higher grade and the fines are the lower grade used in tea bags.
I think I read that somewhere too!
post #112 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by terance
I have been a tea drinker for a long time, hot, cold, green, dark whatever it is, I love trying new teas.

I was wondering if there was some kind of online seller, or local seller that you guys perfer tastewise?

I've been in an Earl grey mode lately, but i just got out of a decaf green tea phase.

-matt
I second the earl Grey sentiment - delicious, aromatic and very relaxing IMHO. I do also enjoy chai and some different types of green teas though; sorry that this doesn't help much in your search, just felt like chiming in. I guess if you get the chance though, there is a delicious tea that was gotten for me on a recent trip to England called Harrods - good stuff, very full flavor but not overly acidic. Hope this helps someand good teaing
post #113 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundGoon
I second the earl Grey sentiment - delicious, aromatic and very relaxing IMHO. I do also enjoy chai and some different types of green teas though; sorry that this doesn't help much in your search, just felt like chiming in. I guess if you get the chance though, there is a delicious tea that was gotten for me on a recent trip to England called Harrods - good stuff, very full flavor but not overly acidic. Hope this helps someand good teaing
There's a tea called Harrods? or are you referring to the posh department store's tea? The food market in Harrods is well worth a visit BTW!
post #114 of 644
Sorry. I should have been clearer and stated that what was swept up was added back into the lowest grade bin. Spillage occurs because this process is not carried out with surgical precision. This is all conjecture in the end anyway. I don't need you-know-who (insert giant international tea consortium here) coming down hard and suing me back into university level poverty. Sweet work is almost over. What an unevental day surfing the forums.
post #115 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by wower
My view of bubble tea is that is while it definately belongs to the tea-fi thread I am more interested in traditional teas. For the record, I am not asian, tried it, and nearly choked. Definately something to put in the acquired taste category in my opinion. Like music, to each his own.
Huh?! Bubble tea isn't really proper tea anyway! It's just a fun drink that you have instead of a soft drink! It's not the type of sit-down-in-an-ancient-teahouse-and-take-small-sips-while-one-engages-in-deep-personal-review-and-reflection type of tea I never thought people took it so seriously
post #116 of 644
Quick impressions of the Adagio Ti Kuan Yin:

DISCLAIMER: I'm not using distilled/mineral water or a proper tea set, which might prevent the full potential of the tea to be realised.

Well since it arrived, I've had two separate lots, which roughly translates into about 3-4 cups. It's pretty good though definitely not the best Ti Kuan Yin I've had. The colour is a nice golden yellow. I don't drink the first steeping and usually leave the 2nd steeping for about 1.5-2minutes. 3rd [correction] steeping is about 2-3 minutes. The reason why I'm not completely satisfied is because there is a bit of after-taste/bitterness, but generally quite clean. The truly exceptional Ti Kuan Yin should hardly have an after-taste. What it does leave you with is the deeply mesmerising and rich aroma (which is slightly lacking from this variant) and a very clean taste. The aroma is good, but isn't as strong as some of the nicer versions I've had. I'm not an experienced tea drinker, but I think I know what I like. Overall, this tea is pretty good, but there may be better variants out there (more $$$ though).
post #117 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder
Quick impressions of the Adagio Ti Kuan Yin:

DISCLAIMER: I'm not using distilled/mineral water or a proper tea set, which might prevent the full potential of the tea to be realised.

Well since it arrived, I've had two separate lots, which roughly translates into about 3-4 cups. It's pretty good though definitely not the best Ti Kuan Yin I've had. The colour is a nice golden yellow. I don't drink the first steeping and usually leave the 2nd steeping for about 1.5-2minutes. 2nd steeping is about 2-3 minutes. The reason why I'm not completely satisfied is because there is a bit of after-taste/bitterness, but generally quite clean. The truly exceptional Ti Kuan Yin should hardly have an after-taste. What it does leave you with is the deeply mesmerising and rich aroma (which is slightly lacking from this variant) and a very clean taste. The aroma is good, but isn't as strong as some of the nicer versions I've had. I'm not an experienced tea drinker, but I think I know what I like. Overall, this tea is pretty good, but there may be better variants out there (more $$$ though).
I would contribute some of the after-taste/bitterness to the age of the tea. Does it smell good? I find the worst grade of fresh Tikunyin, less than 6month old, is better than top grades that's more than 2 yrs old.
Tea ain't no wine. newer is better ..
post #118 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by chesebert
I would contribute some of the after-taste/bitterness to the age of the tea. Does it smell good? I find the worst grade of fresh Tikunyin, less than 6month old, is better than top grades that's more than 2 yrs old.
Tea ain't no wine. newer is better ..
Actually, the tea leaves themselves do smell very nice!

I found that the 3rd steeping or 2nd drinkable steeping was the nicest. The bitterness was gone and it was very smooth! Admittedly, it didn't smell as nice as the previous steepings.

Because of that, I think I can recommend this tea. I'm going to make another batch just to confirm my findings

After the Ti Kuan Yin, I'm going to try the Dragon Well (Long Jing). I happen to have two different types: one from Adagio and the other from a random tea shop in Hong Kong. Neither are particularly expensive variants.
post #119 of 644
Where is the best place to get canisters for the tea? I purchase about 8oz to 1lb at a time and need canisters to put it in.
post #120 of 644
Quote:
Originally Posted by chef8489
Where is the best place to get canisters for the tea? I purchase about 8oz to 1lb at a time and need canisters to put it in.
I'm not sure about the best place to buy tea canisters, but have a look on http://www.uptontea.com/ It'll be on this page. (to save you time)
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