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Pen-Fi (FPs, RBs, BPs, etc...) [56k Warning] - Page 144

post #2146 of 2492

I used to use Hi-Tec C 0.4mm exclusively, I now have a fountain pen just as fine to go with it. A Hi-Tec C with a good titanium body is just awesome, both in feel and how it writes.

post #2147 of 2492
I used to hold Lamy Safari/Al-Star in high regard, but it seems cheaper pens are made to write on cheaper paper.
I was writing with the Safari today on a pretty high quality paper. The nib was too smooth, no feedback. Suddenly it would go into slide mode; it would just slip on the paper...
Maybe the EF point will be better.
post #2148 of 2492
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

I used to hold Lamy Safari/Al-Star in high regard, but it seems cheaper pens are made to write on cheaper paper.
I was writing with the Safari today on a pretty high quality paper. The nib was too smooth, no feedback. Suddenly it would go into slide mode; it would just slip on the paper...
Maybe the EF point will be better.

That's really more a point of preference… Some like a buttery smooth experience while others prefer a bit of tactile feedback. Finer nibs do tend to be more tactile. Wetter inks make for a slipperier ride as well. Not all premium paper is the nearly-glossy experience of, say, CF either… Laid paper will give pretty much any ink in any nib a bit of the ol' touch.

post #2149 of 2492
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

I used to hold Lamy Safari/Al-Star in high regard, but it seems cheaper pens are made to write on cheaper paper.
I was writing with the Safari today on a pretty high quality paper. The nib was too smooth, no feedback. Suddenly it would go into slide mode; it would just slip on the paper...
Maybe the EF point will be better.

The EF nib is very smooth on rhodia, though it does give more feedback on cheaper notepaper and printer paper. Personally I'm in the buttery smooth, no feedback and slightly wet camp, aside from the badly angled section grip, the Lamy Safari EF is a fantastic pen for me, only thing I would like is a bit more flex to the nib. I might have to get a Namiki Falcon Fine...

post #2150 of 2492

:wink:

Yes, Falcon Fine...

post #2151 of 2492

@ Fountain Pen people

 

 

 

Anyway. So I submerge my nub and full tip into the ink to draw up ink into my converter. There is still some space left between the top of the 'plugner' and the ink level. Is this normal?

 

Next, I need to angle my nub in a way sometimes to get the ink to flow. Is this normal?

 

Do I need to ever touch the plunger again once I've filled it? Say push it in a bit to push more ink through or never touch it until I need to refill again?

 

I find that I can't write 'upright' and need to angle my nub. Does this have any ramifications.

 

I find that it works well with script and other 'flowing' writting but is hard at math when you constantly pick the nub up from the paper to start somewhere else.

 

Any tips?

 

This is the Jinhao X750 ($5) with the Parker Quink($7.5) for those wondering. 

post #2152 of 2492
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post
 

@ Fountain Pen people

 

Anyway. So I submerge my nub and full tip into the ink to draw up ink into my converter. There is still some space left between the top of the 'plugner' and the ink level. Is this normal?

Yes. There's some space left, but if you do a fill-drain-fill cycle, you should be able to fill it completely.

 

Next, I need to angle my nub in a way sometimes to get the ink to flow. Is this normal?

Thats how a nib works. Its not a rollerball, the nib only has a small contact area, otherwise the ink won't flow. That said, look up on holding the pen correctly.

 

Do I need to ever touch the plunger again once I've filled it? Say push it in a bit to push more ink through or never touch it until I need to refill again?

No. The ink is sucked out of the converter on its own.

 

I find that I can't write 'upright' and need to angle my nub. Does this have any ramifications.

A Fountain Pen is not meant to be held upright.

 

I find that it works well with script and other 'flowing' writting but is hard at math when you constantly pick the nub up from the paper to start somewhere else.

 

Any tips?

 

This is the Jinhao X750 ($5) with the Parker Quink($7.5) for those wondering. 

 

This is the correct way to hold a FP, the pen is held at an angle of 40-50 degrees from the paper :

 

 

The Nib contacts the paper flat:

 

 

This is the wrong way!! There'll be no ink flow :

 

 

You cannot rotate a FP like you can with the ballpen/pencil.

 

Here's the full link of the (very good) page where I took these pictures from: http://www.jetpens.com/blog/how-to-write-with-a-fountain-pen/pt/271


Edited by proton007 - 11/4/13 at 6:41pm
post #2153 of 2492

Thank you very much, I got the basics but I guess its time for me to learn my own style!

 

I've seen some caligraphy pens have their nib spit apart to create the wide style. Can mind do that?

post #2154 of 2492

Bowei, is this your first fountain pen? If so, congratulations.

 

About the calligraphy pens; there are two types: italic and copperplate. An italic nib is wide and chisel shaped, and the variation in stroke width is determined by the directions you move the nib in and the angle you hold it at. A copperplate nib is flexible, so the stroke width is determined by pressure applied to the nib. So any italic or gothic hands you see will be done with an italic nib, and flowy cursive hands are done with a copperplate nib. Copperplate is much more difficult to do well.

 

You can tell just by looking if a pen is italic or not, but flexibility you have to feel. Very few modern pens are flexible enough for copperplate, and it wasn't extremely common even in vintage pens. Your pen won't be able to do calligraphy, but if you want to try it out the cheapest way (and actually the best way if you're really hardcore about calligraphy) would be to get a dip pen holder and a flexible dip pen nib to go with it.

post #2155 of 2492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post
 

Bowei, is this your first fountain pen? If so, congratulations.

 

About the calligraphy pens; there are two types: italic and copperplate. An italic nib is wide and chisel shaped, and the variation in stroke width is determined by the directions you move the nib in and the angle you hold it at. A copperplate nib is flexible, so the stroke width is determined by pressure applied to the nib. So any italic or gothic hands you see will be done with an italic nib, and flowy cursive hands are done with a copperplate nib. Copperplate is much more difficult to do well.

 

You can tell just by looking if a pen is italic or not, but flexibility you have to feel. Very few modern pens are flexible enough for copperplate, and it wasn't extremely common even in vintage pens. Your pen won't be able to do calligraphy, but if you want to try it out the cheapest way (and actually the best way if you're really hardcore about calligraphy) would be to get a dip pen holder and a flexible dip pen nib to go with it.

Yes it is, thanks!

 

Oh I see, thanks!

post #2156 of 2492
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post
 

I've seen some caligraphy pens have their nib spit apart to create the wide style. Can mind do that?

 

This is a chart of the commonly available nib styles in regular pens:

 

You can see that the B/BB and Italic (at the end) have a flat and wide contact area. Is that what you meant?

 

The other type is 'flexible' where the nib's tines spread on applying pressure:

 

 

Calligraphy pens have more options.


Edited by proton007 - 11/4/13 at 11:54pm
post #2157 of 2492
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post
 

Bowei, is this your first fountain pen? If so, congratulations.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

About the calligraphy pens; there are two types: italic and copperplate. An italic nib is wide and chisel shaped, and the variation in stroke width is determined by the directions you move the nib in and the angle you hold it at. A copperplate nib is flexible, so the stroke width is determined by pressure applied to the nib. So any italic or gothic hands you see will be done with an italic nib, and flowy cursive hands are done with a copperplate nib. Copperplate is much more difficult to do well.

 

You can tell just by looking if a pen is italic or not, but flexibility you have to feel. Very few modern pens are flexible enough for copperplate, and it wasn't extremely common even in vintage pens. Your pen won't be able to do calligraphy, but if you want to try it out the cheapest way (and actually the best way if you're really hardcore about calligraphy) would be to get a dip pen holder and a flexible dip pen nib to go with it.

 

Yes it is, thanks!

 

Oh I see, thanks!

Congrats to our resident Panda! 

post #2158 of 2492

About time it arrived! Welcome to the club Bowei.

 

A fountain pen can be a little different to use if you grew up with ballpoints or fineliners. There are some fountain pens that work fine perfectly upright, however such a position is usually very scratchy as you are not using the proper contact area on the nib.

 

If you are going to try and flex, only apply the pressure on a pulling stroke or risk ruining the nib, it also goes without saying that pressing too hard will also have the chance to ruin your nib.

post #2159 of 2492

Thanks for the welcome guys, yeah, I've been testing and working with it already. It's quite nice at the moment. 

post #2160 of 2492
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post
 

 

This is a chart of the commonly available nib styles in regular pens:

 

You can see that the B/BB and Italic (at the end) have a flat and wide contact area. Is that what you meant?

 

The other type is 'flexible' where the nib's tines spread on applying pressure:

 

 

Calligraphy pens have more options.

 

Is that a 14k nib on a Safari? I've never seen one of those...

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