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The Headphone Driver Pics Thread - Page 9

post #121 of 318

Amazing thread!  You can't really see much in this picture because of the foam, but here's a picture of the Audeze LCD-1 driver

 

audeze_lcd101.jpg

post #122 of 318

Looks a wee bit smaller than the LCD-2 driver. tongue.gif

post #123 of 318


i see that alot in akg drivers.... why they have grooves that coils like a worm like that(if i'm making sense here) on the outer part of the driver? it's interesting. how does that design affect the frequency response?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MDR30 View Post

AKG K3 driver, beginning of the 1980s. "Multi diaphragm system/200 ohms". One of the first AKG Varimotion (two-layered) drivers?

 

PB060367.JPG

post #124 of 318

I believe the grooves help the driver stay rigid as it moves.  And that is also why it has a dome in the center with the ridged area around it.  It is all an attempt at keeping the driver rigid.  A bigger driver can move more air which is a good thing (LCD2 and O2 drivers are huge) but it is hard to keep big drivers from flexing.  So I'm guessing the dome is a very solid shape to use, but only works up to a certain size, so they use a different shape or form on the outside of the dome.  I wonder if 2 different shapes or pattern structures helps keep one kind of frequency from bending the driver, because different frequencies have different effects on different shapes or driver patterns.  So if you use 2 shapes in one driver, it effectively reduces the surface area effected by the movement. 

 

Just guesses here, maybe someone can help fill in or let me know if I'm off base. 

post #125 of 318


interesting. have you ever compared the current akg 240s to akg 240m drivers. what makes them so different besides of impedance?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhythmdevils View Post

I believe the grooves help the driver stay rigid as it moves.  And that is also why it has a dome in the center with the ridged area around it.  It is all an attempt at keeping the driver rigid.  A bigger driver can move more air which is a good thing (LCD2 and O2 drivers are huge) but it is hard to keep big drivers from flexing.  So I'm guessing the dome is a very solid shape to use, but only works up to a certain size, so they use a different shape or form on the outside of the dome.  I wonder if 2 different shapes or pattern structures helps keep one kind of frequency from bending the driver, because different frequencies have different effects on different shapes or driver patterns.  So if you use 2 shapes in one driver, it effectively reduces the surface area effected by the movement. 

 

Just guesses here, maybe someone can help fill in or let me know if I'm off base. 

post #126 of 318

http://i882.photobucket.com/albums/ac26/RexAeterna/DSC00892.jpg

http://i882.photobucket.com/albums/ac26/RexAeterna/DSC00882.jpg


is it me or these headsets use the same type of drivers as akg's do? if you can see it. it's a pair of old 5.1 cyber snipa headset i owned and if it's true. it was just sitting around and i got curious

post #127 of 318

pro4aaatHV1a.jpg

 

pro4aaatHV1a_b.jpg

 

The left one from the current Koss pro4 Series with Titanium coating. The right one from the HV/1A series from 1974. Booth have the same diameter size about 57mm and a fully compatible design. 

The left picture of the backsight of the pro4 shows above the dampening venting material.

The HV driver has a huge magnetic structure and weight a bit more.The plastic frame is also better quality made. From the sound the HV outperforms the pro4 in every aspect.

 

post #128 of 318

Interesting pics! Titanium is supposed to improve stiffness, changing the resonance behaviour of the diaphragm. The unit's moving mass also affects resonance and frequency response, as does (maybe even more!) back dampening of the driver.

 

Modern neodynium magnets are much smaller and lighter  than most magnets from the 1970s. The added weight of the older driver, however, could be an advantage regarding unwanted resonances.

 

The old plastic frame looks much stronger, like nylon, compared to the contemporary Koss China plastic that breaks all too easily.

 

The older driver probably has a higher impedance as well. So, there are quite a few factors that influences sound quality...

 

After all - constructing headphones is an art.

post #129 of 318

ATH-T500 53mm Driver

5.jpg

 

Back of the driver

6.jpg

 

Grado SR80 non-i driver without the magnet biggrin.gif

24.jpg

post #130 of 318

AKG K530, driver about 26mm

 

DSC01424x.jpg

 

DSC01425x.jpg


Edited by akgfan - 2/1/11 at 4:00pm
post #131 of 318

I bought AKG K701 but I didn't like them and sent them back. They had strange imperfections/damages on both drivers. So much for reference high end headphones. They were from big musikhouse which sells products from distributors.

 

left driver:

 

DSC01913x.jpg

 

right driver:

 

DSC01914x.jpg

post #132 of 318

^^ strange. My 701s dont have that Imperfection. But when They start to Move, if i turn up the bass a bit and the Volume the driver starts to make a noise and i noticed its not keeping its form when it starts to move. just a little part of the driver wrinkles in a way. its wierd.

post #133 of 318

AKG K242 HD driver looks the same as K530 26mm

 

DSC01922x.jpg

post #134 of 318

Latest AKG products seems to lack quality. confused_face.gif Even that plastic thing on outher headband on K701 had an imperfection.

post #135 of 318

Hi, I have same problem :(. I bought K-701 on thomann.de

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