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Binaural suggestions?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Can anyone reccomend any good binaural recordings? I listen to mostly classical and comtemporary jazz music, but am open to all suggestions. I've already purchased the Pearl Jam binaural album and like it a lot, so I'm looking to expand my binaural collection. Shoot away...
post #2 of 23
bloodydoorknob say,
Quote:
I'm looking to expand my binaural collection. Shoot away...
I have no suggestions, but I have seen sites (mostly vinyl) that talk about recording in binaural. I remember them talking about recording at some farmhouse in Virginia (?).

I have questions for you: "What kind of equipment do you need to listen to binaural recording. I believe you need special headphones (Ety sells a pair), but what other equipment do you need? Can you rip a binaural recording on to a player filled with stereo ripped recording? Is the cost worth it?

Thank You
post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
To listen to binaural recordings you don't need a special pair of phones like the ones etymotic offers, any set of closed cans or iem's will work, as long as they have good sound isolation, as the binaural effect can greatly be reduced through speakers and open-air phones. As far as recording goes, I don't believe you can transfer stereo music to binaural, but if you do find a way, then yes, I believe it is totally worth it, as the sound is amazing. Here is a link to some binaural sound recordings to give you an idea. Put on some closed cans and try the recording of the 2 dogs listed under this link: http://www.noogenesis.com/binaural/binaural.html
post #4 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloodydoorknob
As far as recording goes, I don't believe you can transfer stereo music to binaurall[/url]
Thank You. I will check it out.

Can I download files to my iPod without any change in quality?
post #5 of 23
I just received two binaural recordings of natural events from Gordon Hampton. As I am listening to the first one, a thunderstorm in Amazonia, I can't really say I can make a difference with the recorded sound and the real sound anymore. This recording is nothing short of phenomenal.
post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloodydoorknob
To listen to binaural recordings you don't need a special pair of phones like the ones etymotic offers, any set of closed cans or iem's will work, as long as they have good sound isolation, as the binaural effect can greatly be reduced through speakers and open-air phones. As far as recording goes, I don't believe you can transfer stereo music to binaural, but if you do find a way, then yes, I believe it is totally worth it, as the sound is amazing. Here is a link to some binaural sound recordings to give you an idea. Put on some closed cans and try the recording of the 2 dogs listed under this link: http://www.noogenesis.com/binaural/binaural.html
Wow. That was an experience for sure.

I'm used to the middle-of-the-head imaging of headphones, though. I don't mind it very much, and sometimes I quite like the feeling of intimatecy from the sound of headphones. But more on topic, listening to the two dogs is (almost) just like listening to surround speakers, and that, is cool.
post #7 of 23
Since you say you like classical music, maybe you should try Mahler's 4th conducted by Inbal, on Denon. It's supposed to be the best symphony of Inbal's complete Mahler cycle. The recording wasn't actually binaural, but does seem to use single-point technique:

"This critically acclaimed recording was recorded in
the large hall of the Alte Oper in Frankfurt, West
Germany, using only a single pair of Bruel & Kjaer
Type 4006 microphones, which were spaced approximately
0.5 meters apart and positioned 3.5 meters behind the
conductor and at a height of 3.5 meters from the floor."

(from a post at groups.google.co.jp)

It's a shame they didn't either go the whole hog (whatever the hell that means!) and place the mics approx 15cm apart for binaural effect, or replicate typical speaker spacing (1.5 - 2 metres). At 50cm, you'll get exact soundstage duplication from ... your boombox. But I guess it was a way to reduce reverb and increase brightness. Worth checking out.
post #8 of 23
Have you checked out this thread?

http://www.head-fi.org/forums/showthread.php?t=209012

The must-try "benchmark" CD! [link and details inside]
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyeresist View Post
Since you say you like classical music, maybe you should try Mahler's 4th conducted by Inbal, on Denon. It's supposed to be the best symphony of Inbal's complete Mahler cycle. The recording wasn't actually binaural, but does seem to use single-point technique:

"This critically acclaimed recording was recorded in
the large hall of the Alte Oper in Frankfurt, West
Germany, using only a single pair of Bruel & Kjaer
Type 4006 microphones, which were spaced approximately
0.5 meters apart and positioned 3.5 meters behind the
conductor and at a height of 3.5 meters from the floor."

(from a post at groups.google.co.jp)

It's a shame they didn't either go the whole hog (whatever the hell that means!) and place the mics approx 15cm apart for binaural effect, or replicate typical speaker spacing (1.5 - 2 metres). At 50cm, you'll get exact soundstage duplication from ... your boombox. But I guess it was a way to reduce reverb and increase brightness. Worth checking out.
Binaural recording and single-point stereo are not the same. Read more here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binaural_recording

Many years ago, I heard a pair of JVC binaural headphones demonstrated in a stereo shop. The JVC phones consisted of a pair of normal headphones, with microphones placed in each earpiece, with an ear-shaped opening. You could record a pair of speakers from your normal listening position, and when played back, it would sound as if you were listening to the speakers.
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloodydoorknob View Post
To listen to binaural recordings you don't need a special pair of phones like the ones etymotic offers, any set of closed cans or iem's will work, as long as they have good sound isolation, as the binaural effect can greatly be reduced through speakers and open-air phones. As far as recording goes, I don't believe you can transfer stereo music to binaural, but if you do find a way, then yes, I believe it is totally worth it, as the sound is amazing. Here is a link to some binaural sound recordings to give you an idea. Put on some closed cans and try the recording of the 2 dogs listed under this link: http://www.noogenesis.com/binaural/binaural.html
I was looking forward to trying this but for some reason when I click on the links on that page nothing happens. What am I missing?

*-edit - OK, I know what's wrong. I'm using Firefox when I get no sound. Everything works as it should when using I.E. Anyone know how to make this work in Firefox?
post #11 of 23
I don't have the Pearl Jam Binaural CD, are there only certain tracks that are recorded binaurally? Can you tell me which one are those? Thanks.
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloodydoorknob View Post
the binaural effect can greatly be reduced through open-air phones.


Nonsense. The big difference in binaural presentation lies with whether or not the headphone have diffuse field equalisation or not. Headphones with it sound even better with binaural recordings.
post #13 of 23
There always seems to be confusion about what a binaural recording is. Put simply, the person who records the music doesn't use standard microphones. Instead, they use a model of a human head (there are variations on this) with microphones inside the ears.

Thus, the recording is just like how a human hears it. Now, there are a lot of variables, different dummy heads, techniques, etc., but that's the short of it. Also, you cannot convert a regularly recorded piece to binaural. You just can't do it.

As for gear, you can get the effect with any headphone, open or closed. I've listened on the AKG K-1000 with the earspeakers canted out (which is as open as you can get with headphones) and the effect is still there. Very much so.

The best binaural piece out there is this:

HECTOR BERLIOZ: Symphonie fantastique; Love Scene from Romeo et Juliette - Cincinnati Sym. Orch./Paavo Jarvi - Telarc SACD-60578

Unfortunately, you need some gear to access it. This is a SACD and you need a multichannel SACD player to get the binaural track. When they recorded this, they stuck a Neumann head (one of the best) up in the balcony and used it to record the rear channels. So if you put this disc on and jack your headphone amp into channels 4 and 5 on your SACD player, you get binaural bliss. On a nice DSD SACD, no less. This is the best recording I've heard. You are there and it's creepily real.

Also, the Pearl Jam CD isn't entirely binaural. I think there are a few binaural effects, but the album was recorded traditionally. Still a good album, though.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by wlai View Post
I don't have the Pearl Jam Binaural CD, are there only certain tracks that are recorded binaurally? Can you tell me which one are those? Thanks.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binaural_%28album%29

The ones marked with an asterisk use binaural recording techniques.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by wlai View Post
I don't have the Pearl Jam Binaural CD, are there only certain tracks that are recorded binaurally? Can you tell me which one are those? Thanks.
Watch out. This album is one of the worst I've heard. It's muddy as hell.
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