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What book are you reading right now? - Page 252

post #3766 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDreamthinker View Post
 

 

I have read Wind-Up, but dropped it 100 pages before finish. To me it suffered from the same illness 1Q84 suffers from, namely the randomness and lack of orientation. 

I had difficulties following the convoluted plot(s) and after a while completely lost track of things, with characters disappearing from the plot (seemingly forgotten) and situations hardly explained...

 

To me Murakami is a short story / short novel writer, who tends to loose track of his ideas when given too much paper. Therefore i mostly enjoyed Norwegian Wood and After Dark (many core themes are recycled in many of his works).

 

of course these are my personal experiences and yours should differ.

Very much so. It makes him an author whom to me, if you've read one of his books you've essentially read them all.

post #3767 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post
 

Very much so. It makes him an author whom to me, if you've read one of his books you've essentially read them all.

 

Same opinion here. In my eyes, 2 would suffice:

 

Norwegian Wood (slightly different) & Wind-Up (if you manage to get through it)...the rest is him reusing the worn out  themes and motives he adores.

 

 

- after having finished these +1000 pages,  of literal randomness and reading other works, i came to the conclusion that essentially all other Murakami books have been mixed into this one book, making it his 'magnus opus'.

 

I only managed to finish it because of a hospital stay, which gave me the time and the patience i needed...

 

P.S: The nicest and most seductive cover art i have ever seen. Love the cover hate the content...


Edited by TheDreamthinker - 7/8/14 at 11:07am
post #3768 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDreamthinker View Post
 

 

I believe you and others would still be reading them, if they were bad...

 

While on the topic of nostalgia, a book that I have & will recommend more than once to people:

 

 

One of my favourite (fiction) novels thus far (ever?).

 

Ticket for the nostalgia-train...pure nostalgia...

 

I read that book and stopped after maybe 50 pages. Glad I eventually finished it and really liked it. If you loved the book don't have the experience ruined by watching the movie!

The movie really sucked the life out of the book and some of my favorite parts of the book were totally left out. The movie is way too dreary and kind of depressing.

 

It's like a summary of the book and I wonder if the director read it. He should have focused less on the look of the film and more on it's characters.

 

I hope someone 20-50 years from now will still re-make the movie. I think someone like Richard Linklater could do it. Well, if it's a US remake..which I wouldn't prefer.

 

I think after I watched the movie I immediately destroyed the disc. The only other time I did that was with the horribly depressing russian film "The Ascent".

 

BTW Right now i'm reading "Unbroken". I have an addiction to reading WWII history I think.

post #3769 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdockweiler View Post

I read that book and stopped after maybe 50 pages. Glad I eventually finished it and really liked it. If you loved the book don't have the experience ruined by watching the movie!
The movie really sucked the life out of the book and some of my favorite parts of the book were totally left out. The movie is way too dreary and kind of depressing.

It's like a summary of the book and I wonder if the director read it. He should have focused less on the look of the film and more on it's characters.

I hope someone 20-50 years from now will still re-make the movie. I think someone like Richard Linklater could do it. Well, if it's a US remake..which I wouldn't prefer.

I think after I watched the movie I immediately destroyed the disc. The only other time I did that was with the horribly depressing russian film "The Ascent".

BTW Right now i'm reading "Unbroken". I have an addiction to reading WWII history I think.

Funny, thats the first time i hear someone distroying a CD out of hatred biggrin.gif

Although it is one of my favourite casual books, i have never watched the movie. I have it on my hard drive, but after seeing the actors, i immediately stopped.
I probably won't watch the movie any time soon.

Why did you stop reading the first time?
Edited by TheDreamthinker - 7/8/14 at 10:07am
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This book was awesome and disturbing like SK usually is. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by DLeeWebb View Post
 

post #3775 of 3825

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post #3776 of 3825

Love Baseball history.  

post #3777 of 3825
Last and First Men by Olaf Stapledon




A milestone book in Science Fiction - written in 1930 and a huge influence on many, many authors, including Brian Aldiss, Arthur C. Clark, HP Lovecraft and many others. This 1930 book discussed television, atomic weapons & genetic engineering - and that's just in the first few chapters!

I must issue two warnings about this book:

Warning #1: This is not a novel in the traditional sense.

When this book was released it completely confounded the critics. It has no actual characters. The entire story is almost a lecture or documentary told vast millenia in the future by the last living human telling the story of the downfall of man. If you come to this book looking for a plot, story arc or character development, forget it.

Warning #2: This book is also highly political and makes very strong social commentary. It is filled with nationalistic and racial stereotypes, and is about as politically incorrect as it gets. In addition, Olaf Stapledon was a pacifist and had very strong views that sound Marxist (although he claimed not to be a Marxist)

Here is his description of America:
Quote:
Yet here was a people of unique promise, gifted innately beyond all other peoples. Here was a race brewed of all the races, and mentally more effervescent than any. Here were intermingled Anglo-Saxon stubbornness, Teutonic genius for detail and systematization, Italian gaiety, the intense fire of Spain, and the more mobile Celtic flame. Here also was the sensitive and stormy Slav, a youth-giving Negroid infusion, a faint but subtly stimulating trace of the Red Man, and in the West a sprinkling of the Mongol.

I doubt this book could be published today.

With that said, I am very much enjoying the book. Both for it's amazing scope and it's mind-jarring criticism of humanity's penchant for tribalism.
post #3778 of 3825
I'm currently re-reading the first 4 volumes of Spike Milligan's war memoirs. It's been too long since I enjoyed these.

Also, 'The Golden Strangers' by Henry Treece, a tale of the coming of the Celts to Britain and the stone tool-wielding people who stood against them. A lot more visceral, carnal and relentless than you'd expect from someone who was better known for (very well-written) fiction for children/young adults.
post #3779 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by longbowbbs View Post
 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
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I hope your enjoying it!

post #3780 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saraguie View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by longbowbbs View Post
 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
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I hope your enjoying it!

I am! It is a great read.

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