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What book are you reading right now? - Page 214

post #3196 of 3825

Cool, did he make any sence? :D

post #3197 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 

Cool, did he make any sence? :D

 

Yes, but he sure was into himself. Smart guy as were all of the other Nobel Winners that were attending.

post #3198 of 3825

"Unbroken..." - Laura Hillenbrand

post #3199 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by DLeeWebb View Post



"Unbroken..." - Laura Hillenbrand

Such a great read! Powerful powerful stuff.
post #3200 of 3825

Just started....

post #3201 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by wrathzombie View Post
 

Just started....

 

I read it last year - not bad

post #3202 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeDoe View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by DLeeWebb View Post
"Unbroken..." - Laura Hillenbrand

Such a great read! Powerful powerful stuff.

 

I saw an interview with the author, and I believe, the man that the story is about. Seemed like a fascinating story. I have had this book on my list since then, I guess that's for about a year or so. I'm liking it so far. (I have loved survival at sea stories since I was a kid and read a biography of Eddie Rickenbacker...)

post #3203 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scribbles View Post

Haruki Murakami - The Wind Up Bird Chronicles

For the second time...

 

If you guys dont mind me asking, why do people re-read books?

post #3204 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjinh View Post
 

 

If you guys dont mind me asking, why do people re-read books?

 

In my case, at least with novels, I tend to get caught up in a story and read through very quickly, and unintentionally miss some details along the way, so re-reading makes me enjoy it all again. Over a period of about eight years when I was younger, I re-read "Shogun" probably 8 or 10 times.....plenty of details there to miss the first time!  

 

Is re-reading a book really that different from buying a movie and periodically watching it again?

post #3205 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjinh View Post

If you guys dont mind me asking, why do people re-read books?

In my case it because I liked it so much the first time and want to again. After five years and reading as many books a year as I do (probably 40ish) you forget most of it and a gret book can be re experienced.

Not so different than buying a movie to watch again in my mind.
post #3206 of 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjinh View Post
 

 

If you guys dont mind me asking, why do people re-read books?

 

Try reading Ulysees by James Joyce. I have read it five times at least and every time I discover something I did not get earlier. Honestly, If someone asks me what the book is about, the only thing I remember is the last chapter about Molly Bloom. I may have to read it again.

post #3207 of 3825

post #3208 of 3825


An interesting view on liberal Christianity, embracing the philosophy and meaning of Christ, without dogma or the supernatural. This is well-tread ground, but very well presented, an interesting resource for those seeking information regarding a more private and personal approach to spirituality. A solid 4 of 5 stars.
post #3209 of 3825
post #3210 of 3825

One of my favorite books on religion: Leo Tolstoy A Confession ( to read for free A Confession wikisource)

 

 

Quote:
 

It had come to this, that I, a healthy, fortunate man, felt I could no longer live: some irresistible power impelled me to rid myself one way or other of life. I cannot say I *wished* to kill myself. The power which drew me away from life was stronger, fuller, and more widespread than any mere wish. It was a force similar to the former striving to live, only in a contrary direction. All my strength drew me away from life. The thought of self-destruction now came to me as naturally as thoughts of how to improve my life had come formerly. and it was seductive that I had to be cunning with myself lest I should carry it out too hastily. I did not wish to hurry, because I wanted to use all efforts to disentangle the matter. "If I cannot unravel matters, there will always be time." and it was then that I, a man favoured by fortune, hid a cord from myself lest I should hang myself from the crosspiece of the partition in my room where I undressed alone every evening, and I ceased to go out shooting with a gun lest I should be tempted by so easy a way of ending my life. I did not myself know what I wanted: I feared life, desired to escape from it, yet still hoped something of it.

And all this befell me at a time when all around me I had what is considered complete good fortune. I was not yet fifty; I had a good wife who loved me and whom I loved, good children, and a large estate which without much effort on my part improved and increased. I was respected by my relations and acquaintances more than at any previous time. I was praised by others and without much self- deception could consider that my name was famous. And far from being insane or mentally diseased, I enjoyed on the contrary a strength of mind and body such as I have seldom met with among men of my kind; physically I could keep up with the peasants at mowing, and mentally I could work for eight and ten hours at a stretch without experiencing any ill results from such exertion. And in this situation I came to this - that I could not live, and, fearing death, had to employ cunning with myself to avoid taking my own life.

My mental condition presented itself to me in this way: my life is a stupid and spiteful joke someone has played on me. Though I did not acknowledge a "someone" who created me, yet such a presentation - that someone had played an evil and stupid joke on my by placing me in the world - was the form of expression that suggested itself most naturally to me.

Involuntarily it appeared to me that there, somewhere, was someone who amused himself by watching how I lived for thirty or forty years: learning, developing, maturing in body and mind, and how, having with matured mental powers reached the summit of life from which it all lay before me, I stood on that summit - like an arch-fool - seeing clearly that there is nothing in life, and that there has been and will be nothing. And *he* was amused. ...

But whether that "someone" laughing at me existed or not, I was none the better off. I could give no reasonable meaning to any single action or to my whole life. I was only surprised that I could have avoided understanding this from the very beginning - it has been so long known to all. Today or tomorrow sickness and death will come (they had come already) to those I love or to me; nothing will remain but stench and worms. Sooner or later my affairs, whatever they may be, will be forgotten, and I shall not exist. Then why go on making any effort? ... How can man fail to see this? And how go on living? That is what is surprising! One can only live while one is intoxicated with life; as soon as one is sober it is impossible not to see that it is all a mere fraud and a stupid fraud! That is precisely what it is: there is nothing either amusing or witty about it, it is simply cruel and stupid.


Edited by mutabor - 10/9/13 at 3:24pm
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