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HD DVD versus Blu Ray - Page 3

post #31 of 99
I will second downloadable/streamable high def beating the new discs. If you take into account the 4/5 years it took for DVD to become truely mainstream neither format will mature before downloadable/streamed hi-def movies are available in most major markets.

I think blu-ray may make it as a legacy format due to the fact it's capacity will be useful for archiving.
post #32 of 99
Is there even enough bandwith available to stream 1080p? Downloading a 2 hour 1080p movie would definitely be a pain on my cable modem.
post #33 of 99
I would not want to download a full 1080P movie,that would take hours and not to mention a HUGE hard drive to handle all your collection and God forbid the hard drive doesnt die one day.Having a HD disk in your hand is prefered.
post #34 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleestack View Post
Is there even enough bandwith available to stream 1080p? Downloading a 2 hour 1080p movie would definitely be a pain on my cable modem.
5 years ago it would have taken at least a week to download a 700mb movie on the fastest connection available in my area. It now takes minutes.

Like I said, by the time these formats achieve mainstream penetration (which is a LONG way off) the speeds will be there.
post #35 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsansite View Post
5 years ago it would have taken at least a week to download a 700mb movie on the fastest connection available in my area. It now takes minutes.

Like I said, by the time these formats achieve mainstream penetration (which is a LONG way off) the speeds will be there.
20 gigs is very different than 700mb. By the time that happens fast for most people, the formats will either have made it or be dead.

Once all new large sets are 1080p, which isn't for away at all, people are going to be looking to use the 1080p capabilities of their sets, whether they understand what it is or not. As these players rapidly become cheaper, coupled with the fact that they can do DVD, people buying their new sets are definitely going to want them.
post #36 of 99
I'm going to have to disagree with you there, most people won't change their technology that quickly. While HD sets are becoming more common, they're certainly nowhere near the norm.

Also, while people don't understand the capabilities of the technology they have little incentive to upgrade (and lets face it the entire HD thing is a mess interms of PR), so won't get HD sets untill they are forced to upgrade their current set.

As to file sizes, the incentive and the technology is there for for bandwith to increase to the necessary levels....
post #37 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsansite View Post
I'm going to have to disagree with you there, most people won't change their technology that quickly. While HD sets are becoming more common, they're certainly nowhere near the norm.
They aren't the norm right now but consider the fact that by the end of 2007, all new large sets will be 1080p and prices aren't going to be outrageous. People are going to by these TVs. Furthermore, you can already see lower pricing with Sharp and Samsung's 1080p LCDs. Samsung has announced that they will be releasing a 70" LCD for sale in normal retail chains early 2007. I work with LG and Samsung's LCD division all the time. I think you may be underestimting how fast that industry is changing. Big and clear is here.
post #38 of 99
BD will not die unless PS3 dies, and PS3 will not die unless game developers stop making games for them. It is just like UMD movies, there will always be UMD movies unless the PSP dies. I think the BD will prevail, seeing that how HDTVs are dropping in prices now and most people, if not all, who are buying TV nowadays are opting for HD LCDTV. Sony has made the right move imho, the future that Sony is aiming is not as far away as most people think.
post #39 of 99
And let's not forget he VAST amount of studio support that BR has that aint going to just disapear like that.I undertand many would love nothing better than for it to die off but you have to be realistic.
post #40 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanderman View Post
I am just waiting for pc disk drives. either format will making backing up files alot simpler.
You mean like Microsoft's?

http://uneasysilence.com/archive/2006/11/8303/
http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=325
post #41 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleestack View Post
20 gigs is very different than 700mb. By the time that happens fast for most people, the formats will either have made it or be dead.

Once all new large sets are 1080p, which isn't for away at all, people are going to be looking to use the 1080p capabilities of their sets, whether they understand what it is or not. As these players rapidly become cheaper, coupled with the fact that they can do DVD, people buying their new sets are definitely going to want them.
Just like 700mb is very different then 10MB when there was only 56k in the mid 90's.


Lets all agree (for the sake of arguement), that DVD's became the "norm" or mainstream, six years ago. At that time, could you download a DVD from your computer, like you can today? No

So you can take that example, and show Blue-Ray or HD-DVD, being atleast 4 to 5 years away from being the "norm" or mainstream, and then adding a year or so on top of that, to when you can see typical people, downloading hi-def movies

Its only a matter or time, when 20GB is labled as "tiny".
post #42 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by kin0kin View Post
BD will not die unless PS3 dies, and PS3 will not die unless game developers stop making games for them. It is just like UMD movies, there will always be UMD movies unless the PSP dies.
Didn't a bunch of big name companies stop making umd movies?
post #43 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirosia View Post
Didn't a bunch of big name companies stop making umd movies?
no idea, I dont watch movies on that puny lcd screen. Even if people stop making movies (BD/UMD), Sony would merely lose the movie industry in this particular format. Their main market is the gaming industry anyway, so as long as game developers don't pull out, the format will stay.

Besides, TV's getting bigger, prices are going lower, and BD movies are affordable. The only concern is the prices of the players. Just like the PS3, yeah sure the console is rather expensive for those who view it as a mere console, but when you look at the games, they cost just as much as new ps2 titles. I can see how they might lose this war if the movies/games are priced much higher than DVD titles, but they didnt overpriced stuff. There is no way BD will lose to HD DVD.
post #44 of 99
This subject holds more than a passing interest for me, as I am in the planning stages of my home theatre room... As of now, my plans include buying the Playstation3 as a BD transport. I like the idea of being able to game in hi def as well as movie play. From there I guess I'll watch and see which format pans out.

Remember, as time passes, prices will drop and availability of players and media will rise. ($29.00 progressive scan DVD player anyone?) As to which format will dominate, only time and the market will tell..
post #45 of 99
I believe people are getting a little ahead of themselves with the HD format wars. Consumers have invested billions in DVD collections, and likewise studios have invested billions bringing practically every movie, TV series, ect. to the DVD format, often totally remastering them at great expense. 8 years ago consumers were ripe for a VHS replacement and DVD has proven to be a success beyond it's creators wildest dreams.

Having said that (the obvious), I really doubt we are going to see an explosion of HD media like we saw with DVD around 2000. I don't find it crazy to believe that neither will win or be a success. Sony put 400,000 BR players in homes in one day, perhaps HD DVD will be better, or cheaper, but I personally doubt either one will garner enough support to fill the aisles of Wal-Mart & Blockbuster and that's what matters in the big picture. I suppose it matters to the uber-enthusiast that has proper theater and is willing to shell out $30+ for a title they may already have on DVD and laser disk but that constitutes an extreme minority.

But maybe that's just my wallet talking as I look at stacks of DVD's up to my ears.
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