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Post Pictures of Your Instrument and more! - Page 38

post #556 of 597






post #557 of 597


This thread shall rise from the dead...
post #558 of 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfkt View Post

This thread shall rise from the dead...
And so at last the beast fell and the unbelievers rejoiced.
But all was not lost, for from the ash rose a great bird.
The bird gazed down upon the unbelievers and cast fire
and thunder upon them. For the beast had been
reborn with its strength renewed, and the
followers of Mammon cowered in horror.



from The Book of Mozilla, 7:15
post #559 of 597




post #560 of 597
I play this bullcrap:
post #561 of 597


















And below.

Yamaha Rydeen 5 piece and some cheap Sabian starter cymbals. Maybe one day I'll actually play it seriously.



I played piano for 7 years with private lessons before quitting when high school started this year. I don't really remember what piano this is, but my mom got it when she wanted to play piano.
post #562 of 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiddler View Post
Sorry I have to correct this, gut strings like Oliv actually project extremely well and you can draw a lot more colour out of them. It does force you to play a lot with arm weight, though. I love how you can just sink into the oliv G with all your weight and it won't complain.

The downsides: they're expensive, and are easily affected by weather. Lots of the top soloists use Oliv G and D on their Strads or Del Gesus. Hardly anybody uses the Oliv A because it sucks. Perlman was the first big name soloist to switch to Dominant, i.e. the first to guy to move off of gut-core. I'm not a fan of the synthetics from Pirastro. I find Evah to be loud and bright, but the timbres and colours you can draw out of them isn't all that interesting. One or two top soloists are known to be using Evahs right now, though, so I guess it works for some. Obligato are weird strings, I think they only work on really bright instruments. I still prefer Dominant to anything from Pirastro, apart from the Synoxa A I'm using right now with bottom two Olivs - blends extremely well, very good combination that's worked on previous violins I've had.
And sorry I have to correct this (albeit 9 months late). Dominant strings are one of the worst strings in the industry these days. They are one of the oldest synthetic designs and have HORRIBLE string noise when played. These strings haven't changed since they were first introduced forever ago. The new designs blow them out of the water from almost any company. I work as a luthier and I NEVER suggest Dominant strings, though I end up selling more of them than any other one model of string because many of the local schools and universities require them, sadly. I don't recommend gut strings often either due to their cost versus life span. A high end player may only get a month or two out of a set of strings that cost well over $100. Switch that to synthetics and you can usually more than double your time for slightly less money. Also it takes a particular instrument to be able to handle gut strings. Most of the modern thin skin (highly graduated) instruments can't handle them because they already have a very full tone from all the graduation. Putting gut strings on emphasizes this even more making for fuzzy flabby low end and veiled highs. The good old German/Euro thick violin is naturally bright and thinner body of sound. Gut strings work great on these because it balances them out.

The best soloist set I've come across so far is the Vision Titanium from Thomastik Infeld. It's like a cross between the brilliance of Pirazzi and the full body of the Obligato. The price isn't too bad on them either. The Obligatos are AMAZING orchestral strings, they are just about as close to gut as you'll get from a synthetic string, but clear enough to do justice to solo work, though clearly not ideal. I don't care for either of the Red or Blue Infeld lines, they just sound dead.

My favorite viola setup is Jargar A, Pirazzi DG, and Spirocore C (tungsten).

My favorite cello setup is Larsen Solo AD, Spirocore GC (tungsten again)

My favorite bass setup is Obligato GD Eudoxa AE (ouch on price though, heh) The clarity from the Obligato is great on the upper strings where definition is more important. The big wide bass from the Eudoxa AE is just mind blowing.

As much as people hate on Pirastro these days I've come to think people are just in the mood of hating the big guy. Pirastro is nearly (and very much used to be) the Microsoft of the string world. They still make the best string and are constantly coming out with new designs, usually 1 new design every 3-4 years which is often in this line of work. Thomastik has come a long way from the lobotomy case that is Dominant though. The whole Vision line is quite good and prices are reasonable. The Spirocore line is simply amazing on the viola and cello. The Red/Blue Infelds were decent when they debuted but now have been completely overshadowed. The best value, especially in the US, is the D'Addario Helicore string. These strings are just a bit more expensive than the Piranito from Pirastro, but far better sound quality. I sell Helicores nearly as much as Dominants and I prefer the Helicore sound to Dominants and at such a price difference they literally sell themselves. I used to sell sets of Dominants and Helicores for almost the same price years ago, but with how European markets have gone the Dominants are getting closer and closer to double the cost of the Helicores.

Anyways sorry to get on my soapbox, but when someone declares Dominants the best string ever I simply can't believe it.
post #563 of 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder View Post
I figured it has more to do with the actually pegs and peg holes changing size/shape in response to temp/humidity changes than the strings themselves. I brought my violin back to Hong Kong (high humidity) during the Easter holidays and it held its pitch much better than when it's in Edinburgh (low humidity). This makes sense as the wood takes in moisture and expands in humid air.
You are on the right track, but actually it is the entire instrument changing size, not just the pegs and peg holes. If you are describing just one peg though it could be that your peg wasn't fitting as well. You'll notice when it's dry your peg will push further through the pegbox and sometimes the luthier doesn't always get the full peg right when they make your pegs, this can lead to the behavior you describe. This is also why during the winter (cold/dry) you'll have more problems tuning your instrument.

Regarding overall tuning, as I mentioned before, the overall size of the instrument changes, though only very slightly, enough to change your tuning though. The entire length from scroll to endbutton shrinks when dry and causes loose strings. The strings do change though, not only the instrument. Depending on where you live you may have outdoor power lines on wooden poles and in the summer when it is hot and moist the lines will relax, when it is cold and dry the lines are taut. In this case the material is completely metal, steel I suppose, and this would be the case for steel strings as well. Full metal isn't affected by humidity, though Gut strings are very much affected by humidity and less so by temperature. The happy medium is synthetic strings which don't have enough metal to react much to temperature and the synthetic core doesn't react to humidity so synthetic strings are the best at staying in tune.

Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder View Post
If there is one complaint, that would be that the strings are rather difficult to grip onto. I use Liebenzeller Gold I, but I feel it isn't quite grippy enough. I'll give the Pirastro Goldflex a go next, but that tends to be much dustier.
Try Jade rosin. It may be a bit too sticky, but I've gotten good results with people who tried it when they asked for more grip. It's about the same price as Goldflex. I personally don't care for Goldflex. I find it too slippery even on thicker strings. I usually recommend Hill or Bernardel for moderate priced good quality rosins. I am surprised to see someone actually using Larsen strings on a violin. I find them painfully piercing. I don't even carry them.

edit: tempted to reply to posts nearly 2 years old.. but I won't, heh.

edit2: If any of you players want to ask any questions about violin/viola/cello/bass please feel free to pm me or post here. I'm no expert, but this is my trade and I know more than most, especially players (some don't even know the names of the parts of their instruments...). I also play viola, but my skills are not great (great musicality, but poor technique) so I didn't go beyond a few years of college. I'll try to get a pic of my viola up sometime in this thread.
post #564 of 597
So. I'm considering trying to track down an OG yamaha guitar and buy one.

Thoughts? Has anyone ever played a keytar? I've seen some videos of a bigger Roland one, but the Yamaha is just too old school to pass up, and it's friendlier on the wallet. I'm not exactly sure what MIDI is though. I don't really...play that kind of keyboard synth....i play the piano. does the midi let me set different sounds to the keys to make it sound like a guitar or something?
post #565 of 597
Quote:
Anyways sorry to get on my soapbox, but when someone declares Dominants the best string ever I simply can't believe it.
never said that.

the player makes the sound, not the string (or the violin). differences in strings are overrated, period. most of the time the "improvements" players feel are mostly placebo. imo anyway.

i'm not talking about differences between steel core and raw gut. that of course makes a tangible difference. im' talking about between say evah and dominant. btw i'm playing on vision solo (non-titanium) and they seem to last long, and can't detect any flaws.

by the way, i think it was aaron rosand who requires all his students to play on oliv. which i guess is a bit crazy, but take it for what it's worth...
post #566 of 597
Thread Starter 
There are a heap of very nice-looking guitars in this thread and it has got me thinking. I really wanted to learn how to play the guitar. What is a good starter acoustic/classical guitar? I absolutely adore the lush, golden sound. Budget? Not quite sure, but somewhere around $400-500 max. I just don't want a tinny-sounding one. I've done about five minutes of research and the Yamaha F310 seems to be a very popular and cheap acoustic. Is it really the SR-60 of the guitar world?
post #567 of 597


post #568 of 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder View Post
There are a heap of very nice-looking guitars in this thread and it has got me thinking. I really wanted to learn how to play the guitar. What is a good starter acoustic/classical guitar? I absolutely adore the lush, golden sound. Budget? Not quite sure, but somewhere around $400-500 max. I just don't want a tinny-sounding one. I've done about five minutes of research and the Yamaha F310 seems to be a very popular and cheap acoustic. Is it really the SR-60 of the guitar world?
Are you interested in a steel string acoustic or a nylon string classical guitar?

Yamaha, Takamine, L'arrive and Seagull all make very good steel string acoustic guitars in the ~500$ price range. Taylor and Guild are better yet but probably a bit above the budget you have set. Yamaha and Takamine classical guitars are also very reasonably priced.
It is important to play test a few personally, even if you have narrowed it down to a particular make & model, because the natural variation in wood does mean some guitars project and sustain a bit better. Also bear in mind, the OEM strings that come on most guitars are quite cheap and thin guage, so a restring to a slightly thicker gauge set will yield better tone. Be sure to get the intonation and action set with the better strings that you upgrade to.

Hope that helps
post #569 of 597
Finally got around to taking a pic of my viola:



1981 Tauno Ekonen 16" and 1997 Seifert sterling w/ sterling tip plate.

Using full Pirazzi at the moment.
post #570 of 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiddler View Post
the player makes the sound, not the string (or the violin). differences in strings are overrated, period. most of the time the "improvements" players feel are mostly placebo. imo anyway.
This is false.
Quote:
i'm not talking about differences between steel core and raw gut. that of course makes a tangible difference. im' talking about between say evah and dominant. btw i'm playing on vision solo (non-titanium) and they seem to last long, and can't detect any flaws.
The difference between evah and dominant is so vast, your comment here has completely discredited your opinions on string choice. Fortunately for you, Vision Solo is a good string. (FYI Evahs are a multi-filiment synthetic string, whereas Dominants are a single mass of synthetic material.)
Quote:
by the way, i think it was aaron rosand who requires all his students to play on oliv. which i guess is a bit crazy, but take it for what it's worth...
This is a bad practice. Strings should be chosen based on player's preferences and how they react with the instrument, not a flat requirement by a teacher.

Gut strings sound horrible on most instruments these days, especially the newer quality chinese violins. If you have a good old euro violin guts can still be OK, but even still I prefer synthetic gut for most recommendations. Steel core can really belt out the power, but you have to be careful about it's harshness becoming too much.
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