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Post Pictures of Your Instrument and more! - Page 9

post #121 of 597
[QUOTE=AdamP88;2124670]





[QUOTE]


Sweet Pictures...Ill post a pic of my piano soon
post #122 of 597
Just out of curiosity, has anyone posted an Esteban Guitar yet? (pics of my stuff soon to come)
post #123 of 597


Left to right: 1845 Boisselot, 1836 Erard, 1936 Steinway

I recently started playing the violin again after a several year hiatus (what was I thinking?). I have a very nice violin from a local maker that I've always been quite pleased with. Next up will be a baroque violin at some point.
post #124 of 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob_McBob View Post


Left to right: 1845 Boisselot, 1836 Erard, 1936 Steinway

I recently started playing the violin again after a several year hiatus (what was I thinking?). I have a very nice violin from a local maker that I've always been quite pleased with. Next up will be a baroque violin at some point.
*picks jaw up from floor* Holy cow! How did you come into possession of those!? and what woods are they made from?
post #125 of 597
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mypasswordis View Post
Yeah, it's post-1900, but not by much. Eugen Gartner.

There's a choice between steel and gold. I use steel because there's no real point in using gold unless for competitions or something; I find the gold wears off easily (maybe just because of my overly sweaty fingers?) although it does sound a bit less sharp. I find steel to be very responsive and easy to handle, especially compared to my last strings. I tried Eudoxa for a taste of gut strings but didn't like them much in terms of sound and they broke more often.

I've tried (no, not really looking to buy ) a Sartory, Vigneron, and a few others. They made my violin sound that much better and made it that much easier to play, even though my violin costs significantly less.
Points taken. Gold E strings, such as the one I'm using (Pirastro Olive Gold E) are not THAT expensive though and the tone is noticeably rounder and less metallic. That said, gold E strings only last as long as the gold plating. When the gold plating wears of, you're left with a steel string My fingers don't get too sweaty, so the gold takes ages to rub off

Even though you didn't like guts strings, you should give the Pirastro Obligato range a try. They're synthetic core strings like the Evah, but have a much warmer sound. Both cost the same.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mypasswordis View Post
You've got 4 bows? Woah, that's pretty insane.
I only ever use the 2nd and 4th bow from the top. The 4th bow is the new bow. It is less forceful and gives a sweeter tone. The 2nd bow is a much stronger bow, more suitable for more virtuosic works (Ysaye, Paganini, Sibelius, etc...) However, it isn't as balanced and bouncy, making string crossing, spiccato, etc slightly more of a hassle (read more difficult). The 1st and 3rd bow are for back up in case the worse should happen.

My brother just got a new (as in made recently) $3k bow made by an English bow maker. It was a wonderful experience playing with it. Everything seemed much easier, especially up bow staccato, which I have been struggling with. Spiccato and detached notes are more easily controlled, but I didn't hear any major differences in the sound compared to my "new" (not sure of age) $1k bow.

It's wonderful to see this thread resurrected from the depths of Head-Fi history! Also glad to see so many musicians amongst us!
post #126 of 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundGoon View Post
Just out of curiosity, has anyone posted an Esteban Guitar yet? (pics of my stuff soon to come)
Yea, this is a esteban classical guitar.
http://www.head-fi.org/forums/showpo...&postcount=110
post #127 of 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by Towert7 View Post
Yea, this is a esteban classical guitar.
http://www.head-fi.org/forums/showpo...&postcount=110
humm.....I just noticed that that Esteban guitar looks like doesn't have the wide neck. So it would be suitable for accoustic but not classical guitar. Just bringing this up in case you do want to study classical guitar. Some good begining classical guitars are from Yamaha, Alvarez, and Takamine. A wide neck is important for good finger techniques.
post #128 of 597
Old pics, sorry about the poor quality.

Gibson Epiphone (My first guitar)



Martin DR-1



Big Baby Taylor

post #129 of 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davesrose View Post
humm.....I just noticed that that Esteban guitar looks like doesn't have the wide neck. So it would be suitable for accoustic but not classical guitar. Just bringing this up in case you do want to study classical guitar. Some good begining classical guitars are from Yamaha, Alvarez, and Takamine. A wide neck is important for good finger techniques.
Ah, that's interesting that you say that. I know my esteban guitar has a wider neck than my Ibanez (a thin neck). About how wide is the neck at the nut of a typical classical guitar? The Esteban is 6cm, and my Ibanez is 5cm.

Thanks for the heads up Davesrose!
post #130 of 597
I play tuba, can't afford my own instrument though :/
post #131 of 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by Towert7 View Post
Ah, that's interesting that you say that. I know my esteban guitar has a wider neck than my Ibanez (a thin neck). About how wide is the neck at the nut of a typical classical guitar? The Esteban is 6cm, and my Ibanez is 5cm.

Thanks for the heads up Davesrose!
Oh, then maybe the Esteban is a true classical neck then. Sorry, pics can be decieving Those measurements more sound like the 12th fret then the nut. It varies by luthier, but an average dimension is: 51-54mm at the nut, and 61-64 at the 12th fret. Classical is also thicker:21-25mm. The neck is the biggest difference between folk and classical guitar, and what took me awhile to get used to: especially when classical hand techniques make you have the palm of your hand directly perpendicular to the neck.

this is actually an article I just found by Kenny Hill. The guy knows his guitars, so it's interesting to see what a luthier looks for:
http://www.hillguitar.com/scripts/fr...tar_setup.html

If you do want to start some classical, Pumping Nylon by Scott Tennant, Solo Guitar Playing by Frederick M Noad, and Major and Minor Diatonic Scales by Andres Segovia are some nice books to start with. The main thing is to just enjoy your guitar!
post #132 of 597
Thread Starter 
skyline889: Oh my, that is one gorgeous guitar.
post #133 of 597
Thanks again for the info Davesrose. I'll be going to the library tomorrow, so I'll see if they have any of those books.

Yea, I'm really having fun playing the guitar. I actually wish I had more time to spend with it, but a little at a time.
post #134 of 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkpowder View Post
My violin teacher's Vuillaume costs over $190k! Even that is pocket change compared to the Strads and Guarneris, which easily cost over $1million. When I'm rich, I'll buy all the violins and headphones in the world...j/k
Yeah, I studied with Nai-Yuan Hu for a few days in the summer, and I think he brought his ex-hubay strad with him, and the sound he produced was gorgeous... Theres a reason why he won the 1985 Queen Elizabeth Competition!

Heres a link to a page on him
http://www.chambermusicinternational...ts&artist_id=9

Heres a link to a recording
http://www.amazon.com/Romantic-Violi...e=UTF8&s=music
post #135 of 597
I hope to learn the bass. So, I'll reserve this spot for a Glossy Blue or Sunbirst Rickenbacker 4003. Or a Gibson EB-0.
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