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How fast does the gum heal after a tooth extraction? - Page 2

post #16 of 50
Once I read one of the fastest healing tissues in the human body is the gum. The cornea I think is actually the fastest.
post #17 of 50
Warm Salt water rinse , closes up in a few weeks , eating peanuts in a month.
Why is the tongue facinated with these new holes?
post #18 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorander
The dentist gave some stitch to the gum area so that helps keep the gum together and prevents fine food particles from lodging deep. I'm just irked that some larger food particles will easily sit on the hole and *almost* feel like a part of the healing gum itself (that is until I rinse my mouth).

Given that I had procrastinated on the matter for more than a year before taking action, it is possible the healing process may take longer since the gum was already becoming unhealthy and I was losing bone density below that area (according to the X-ray). What I'm most concerned with or want to know if the gum will ultimately heal up (it's not nice to know that I may have to live with a permanent gaping hole ).
Yes. The gum will heal up and form a straight ridge you won't be left with a hole don't worry! Give it time though don't expect it to level out immediately, 3 to 6 months is about right.
post #19 of 50
Thread Starter 
Very relieved to hear that. Thanks!
post #20 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorander
Very relieved to hear that. Thanks!

No probs, I enjoy talking about teeth and gums.

Mike.
post #21 of 50
Thread Starter 

This might be a stupid question

Is swimming a good idea during this healing period?
post #22 of 50
I had my upper and lower wisdom teeth (all four still inside the gum) removed separately. On both occasions, any "tongueable" sign of holes was gone after a week or so.

/shrug
post #23 of 50
i don't have any wisdom teeth
post #24 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkFloyd
"3" wisdom teeth? are you a human or an alien life form..... you never know you could be a superhuman who heals in hours as opposed to days have you ever had tests done? nothing is impossible.
Three because I had a broken molar removed earlier, and the 4th wisdom tooth had room to grow in.

I wasn't perfectly healed, but there were no holes and after a few days the only problem I had was the stitches were driving me crazy, so I tried (and mostly succeeded) getting them out. Nothing bad came of it either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorander
That actually reminds me of a friend who went through the same procedure. I think he took out all 4 of his wisdom teeth in the morning or noon. By dinner time he was already eating normally and in the normal portion. Where it is expected that one's face is going to become swollen, his never did and apparently he hardly suffered any post-operation trauma. Weird indeed.
I had mine taken out in the morning, I was knocked out (smart move I think) got home somehow by noon, slept a couple hours, kept those damn gauze pads in for a few more hours, then got fed up, took them out, and ate dinner.
And was bored for the next two days, I took three days off work for it, and I was fine the night I had them removed.

Barely any swelling either.


And from what people I talked to have said, it seems you either look like you got beat up and suffer for days and days or you're fine with minimal swelling/discomfort. I was just one of the lucky ones.

Now anybody want to buy 27 of my 30 tylenol 3's and a whole boatload of 600mg motrin I have left over?




Not superhuman (well the ladies might say I am ), just lucky, and fairly tolerant of pain.

Who knows, who cares. I had it easy suckers.
post #25 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorander
Is swimming a good idea during this healing period?
Not for the first 72 hours, in fact "no" exercise is recommended for the first few days, the last thing you want is the heart pumping away like mad, you want a nice clot to form and you don't want to dislodge it and end up with a "dry socket" they are VERY painful indeed as your jaw bone ends up being exposed so, for the first few days, take it easy and allow the clot to form nicely.... also keep your tongue away from it! If your in the sea a few mouthfuls of sea water will do your gums the world of good (seriously)
post #26 of 50
Thread Starter 
It's been more than a week since the extraction. There was a clot covering the hole indeed but it has since gone away (presumably swallowed along when I was drinking some water). All that's there now is the hole and not even a trace of the post-operation soreness. Is this normal?

p.s. I've been wondering if you're a dentist (or with a profession along the line), PinkFloyd. You seem to know volumes on the subject.
post #27 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zorander
It's been more than a week since the extraction. There was a clot covering the hole indeed but it has since gone away (presumably swallowed along when I was drinking some water). All that's there now is the hole and not even a trace of the post-operation soreness. Is this normal?

p.s. I've been wondering if you're a dentist (or with a profession along the line), PinkFloyd. You seem to know volumes on the subject.
You sometimes will dislodge the clot and be left with a hole, especially if you drink alcohol or smoke, this is no biggie unless there is associated pain and the gum will soon smooth out a few months down the line. If there "is" associated pain or discomfort you could have a dry socket in which case your dentist will pack the hole with a preperation to aid healing and stop the discomfort especially if the bone is exposed to the air.

This may be of help:

"A dry socket is:
Any socket in which a patient is having pain due to the loss of the blood clot thus exposing the bone to air, food, and fluids along with an offensive odor. This often occurs two or more days after an extraction and can last about 5-6 days. It is normal to have soreness and discomfort following an extraction.

However, pain should be lessening by the second day. This condition exists when a blood clot is dislodged from the surgery site thus exposing the bone and fine nerve endings. The blood clot helps in the stopping of bleeding and lays the foundation or framework for new tissue and bone to develop over a two-month healing process. This condition is more common in the mandibular area and in back teeth due to poorer circulation in this area, with wisdom teeth being the most common site. Dry sockets delay the healing process.

It usually takes gum tissue about 3-4 weeks to heal where as the bone can take up to six months to heal."

I am not a dentist, no. However, I have a lot of experience as a patient and I have researched dentistry in great depth and am interested in the subject.
post #28 of 50

I am the same way,  I had my 3rd molar taken out after a month long of pain.  I done messed up by not brushing regularly, however by dinner time i was eating normally.  Just keep rinsing and brushing and it will be fine.

post #29 of 50
That's the only part I'm looking forward too.
post #30 of 50

i know i got my teeth pulled yester day and its so hard to eatfrown.gif

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