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Anyone have no surge protection? - Page 3

post #31 of 67
Quote:
Hmm - we do have a lightning-conductor in on our roof, but I suppose that will not be safe enough for electronics.
You must live in an old Victorian era type house where that is very common.
It is known that lightening will always strike the object that stands out and that is why trees get wacked all the time in residential areas but rarely in the wooded areas.Why ? Because the "lone " tree stood out and made itself a target.
This is also why golfers on a golf course get whacked way more than any other humans,being in a boat during a thunderstorm is unsafe (higher than the water surface),baseball pitchers on the mound get zapped a lot (highest lone object) and why both Victorian houses (biggest damn house on the street ) and large lone trees get lightening rods installed.

What these rods try to do,and very well actually,is to be the tallest point which should take the hit and not the house/tree.This rod has a seriously heavy guage conductive cable that runs from this rod,down the house or tree and finally into a grounding rod inserted deep into the earth.This "Earth Ground" dissapates the power of the lightening strike into the earth thus saving the tree or house from any damage.

When I was a youngster doing tree work I installed a few of these puppies and is the only reason I know about them.My habit of asking "why dude,please explain the why " which pisses of some employers but needs to be asked anyway just to satisfy my curiosity combined with my NEED to know

Modern houses no longer use this method since it was found just grounding the entire house in a subdivision where every house is a clone of all the others on the street means a single one will not be a lightening aphrodesiac by standing out.At every home where the power service enters you will find the system/house ground strap which then goes to a rod buried below the frostline (frozen ground does not conduct and dissapate as well as natural dirt does) and is the central "star ground" point for every single grounded outlet in your house.
Without this connection your three phase AC plugs would be useless because that "third" connection,the ground lug would be floating and doing absolutely nothing.

The surge suppressor is not and never was meant to take a full on strike from lightening (nothing in your home could !) but because it is already done at the house ground level is more of a "bounce" protector that catches the pulse that can eminate from the original earth ground circuit trying to do its job.It is more overflow than it is direct so even though it can be at a high surge potential can be dealt with by using devices that at best are a "one shot" stop gap that can handle surges in the K-Volt range but would be toast,as would everytying else plugged in,if the house was not grounded and you took a direct hit.
post #32 of 67
I use all Monster Power surge protectors on my stereo and my computer. If anything fries, I get to sue them
post #33 of 67
I also just use the Naim Wiremold strips without protectors or even switches. The really do give good results. Obviously unplugging is the safest option. Fortunately we don't have much lighting in my area of Southern California. But we do get some power outages during high Santa Ana winds. I would reconsider my situation if I lived in a high lightning area.
post #34 of 67
After watching a shower of sparks and smoke go flying out of the back of my computer once, I have overkill surge suppression on EVERYTHING I value.

Brickwalls on mission critical stuff.

PS Audio P300 for my Audio stuff.

Power is a lot more stable where I live now, but I'm still paranoid.

-Ed
post #35 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by XxATOLxX
I use all Monster Power surge protectors on my stereo and my computer. If anything fries, I get to sue them
That's true. Would Monster try to weasel their way out of an insurance payment from a Direct Lightning strike?

I doubt even my Brickwall Series Mode Surge suppressors would do much against a direct strike to the wiring in the home.

-Ed
post #36 of 67
PS Audio UPC-200 is definitely the best choice for audio gear. I use the older Ultimate Outlet.

There used to be a lot of lightning storms where I live, I had to often unplug everything and got sick of it. Then I bought a couple APC UPS and haven't had a lightning storm in 2 years...
post #37 of 67
What do people think of a UPC-200 group buy?

There was a fellow on audiogon that bought a bulk order from PS Audio. ~10 units I think and sold them off at $320 shipped obo.

He was making a profit so If we could get 10 units or so perhaps we could get them cheaper than that.

Just a thought.
post #38 of 67
I only have two plugs in my room, plus I've had a monitor and some other stuff fry due power surge. So, that's a no.
post #39 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by omedon
What do people think of a UPC-200 group buy?

There was a fellow on audiogon that bought a bulk order from PS Audio. ~10 units I think and sold them off at $320 shipped obo.

He was making a profit so If we could get 10 units or so perhaps we could get them cheaper than that.

Just a thought.
Sounds like fun, but does a UPC-200 accept 220/240V input? And, can I plug my PC and a power amp into it without overloading it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rickcr42
You must live in an old Victorian era type house where that is very common.
My house isn't that old, but it does have a lightning rod too... so far lightning hasn't fried any of my equipment. (including the modem, lol, I used to replace it at least 3 times a year before I moved)
post #40 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tachikoma
Sounds like fun, but does a UPC-200 accept 220/240V input? And, can I plug my PC and a power amp into it without overloading it?
I does accept 220/240V if ordered that way. I know group buys sometimes need to be homogenous but considering it is a simple board switch to change voltages and the fact that we would be ordering direct from manfacturer I don't think it would be a problem.

Tons of info along with a manual are available here. The creator, Paul McGowan frequents the message boards and will quickly and directly answer any questions you may have. The UPC 200 can run in either a single zone or dual zone mode. Dual zone is meant for maximum isolation, single zone for devices with heavy loads in the 600 Watt+ range.

Anyways, I don't want to subvert this thread. Just noticed a few people, like myself, were looking for a surge protection solution and some were considering UPC-200. If you are interested send me a PM, if more than a few of us are into it I will start a proper group buy thread and start to look into the details.
post #41 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickcr42
You must live in an old Victorian era type house where that is very common.
It is known that lightening will always strike the object that stands out and that is why trees get wacked all the time in residential areas but rarely in the wooded areas.Why ? Because the "lone " tree stood out and made itself a target.
Not really. The former owner was in the lightning-conductor business. The area where I live is only 15 odd years, and most of the houses here are indeed of the same height. Many parts of the Netherlands is very flat. The lightning then usually only strikes in trees or in the last house of a row of terrace-houses. The only victims usually, are cows, standing too close to trees or fences in the fields. It apparently has something to do with currents travelling on the ground surface near by a strike.
post #42 of 67
Quote:
It apparently has something to do with currents travelling on the ground surface near by a strike.
actually beleive it or not it is an actual "bounce" of the strike where the primary target takes most of the hit with the rest just a dipersal of the inital strike and anyone/anything withing range toast
post #43 of 67
No surge protection? Here!

Greetings from Hannover!

Manfred / lini
post #44 of 67
Quote:
Greetings from Hannover!
rumble..rumble..rumble..rumble....


BLAMMMMMMO
post #45 of 67
Quick story and Kinda on topic :

Few years ago (like thirty ) I read story in the local newspaper on a lightening strike during a baseball game that struck the pitcher directly in the head (he being the tallest object due to the mound) and was killed instantly but the weird part was this strike "bounced" from him and hit all eight other players on the field and knocked them out cold !
They survived unlike the pitcher but it has always stuck with me that standing next to an idiot during a thunderstorm can be hazardus to your health even if you are smart enough to take steps so has come to me that if you know a thunderstorm is coming not only do you need to pay attention to where you are but who is around.any idiots and you better distance yourself and quick because you just may catch the overflow
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