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warm sounding vs. dark sounding?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Can some one break this down for me?

Thanks,

Biggie.
post #2 of 9
ok

Dark = A warm, mellow, excessively rich quality in reproduced sound. The audible effect of a frequency response which is clockwise-tilted across the entire range, so that output diminishes with increasing frequency.

Warm = The same as dark, but less tilted. A certain amount of warmth is a normal part of musical sound.


I got these from here : http://www.stereophile.com/showarchives.cgi?50
post #3 of 9
Dark = excessive warmth or warm in a bad way
post #4 of 9

Warm - Dark ?

I'm still in the 'dark' (sorry )

Does that mean that warm is less mids & highs but to an acceptable level (subjectively) & Dark means worse than warm i.e. unacceptable?
post #5 of 9
This is how I understand it:


Warm: Slightly accentuated mids and midbass and slightly rolled off highs.

Dark: Distant mids, somewhat muddled midbass and distant, possibly rolled off highs.
post #6 of 9
For me warm sound is mainly defined by smooth mids and highs, whereas dark sound implies more or less recessed upper mids and highs.

Greetings from Munich!

Manfred / lini
post #7 of 9
Lini: that's the way I understand it as well. While were on the issue, what does bright mean? I mean, stereophile says that it means that the music has an edge to it. The way I've seen it used, is that it has fatiguing highs and upper mids. . .
post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks for confirming by beliefs guys. Ok so I think I have the sound spectrum down now, but isn't it missing one type of sound to the left of neutral?

bright - <insert cool term here> - neutral - warm - dark

I like symmetry hehe.

Quote:
Originally posted by andrzejpw
what does bright mean? I mean, stereophile says that it means that the music has an edge to it. The way I've seen it used, is that it has fatiguing highs and upper mids. . .
I think something with an edge would imply fatiguing highs and upper mids (this music has bite.. my ears hurt).

Biggie.
post #9 of 9
Mhm, I'd rather define bright as having moderately pronounced upper mids and highs - in exaggerated form that would be harsh or shrill for me. So that would make dark -> warm -> neutral <- bright <- shrill/harsh in my order...

Greetings from Munich!

Manfred / Lini
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