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How many of you have tinnitus? - Page 5

post #61 of 181
I'm surprised that so many people here don't have tinnitus. It should be a collective 90% of the members here have tinnitus.. Isn't that the statistic? I remember before discovering this place and headphones and audio altogether, I thought my minor tinnitus was just "the sound of silence." I've learned so much here, but yeah, I don't go to concerts and listen to stuff at harmful volumes so my tinnitus can stay at a minor level.
post #62 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by kurt_fire
What do you guys think is worse. Headphones or speakers?
I don't know about anyone else, but I feel more of a need to crank volume with speakers rather than headphones.
post #63 of 181
I can hear mild tinnitus in a quiet room when I put down the headphones after about an hour of straight listening.

In an attempt to relieve my ears of fatigue, I went to the drug store and bought myself a box of cheap ear plugs. I got about 50 ear plugs for $8 or so. Before I went to sleep that night, I inserted the ear plugs, which made the ringing more up-front and close. Since tinnitus is as much physical as it is mental, the ringing became louder and louder as I concentrated on it. It's a bit of an endurance test if you let it bug you, but as I got up the next morning, I noticed the ringing was gone.

I can't guarantee everyone else will result in the same experience, but don't take my word for it, it might just not work for you. Also, some of you guys are probably thinking of using IEM's like Shure's to try this out with, I would highly *NOT* recommend using them as ear plugs, I've heard of serious accidents associated with them on these forums. Using certified ear plugs is your best bet.
post #64 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by kurt_fire
What do you guys think is worse. Headphones or speakers?
headphone, from personal experiences. the diaphragm of the headphone is closer to the ear while the speakr drivers are further away. and i tend to crank up the headphone, even though its not that loud, therefore more pressure entering directly to the ears.

even blood pressures can produce noises in the ear. there really isnt something called "absolute silent".
post #65 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach123456
I don't know about anyone else, but I feel more of a need to crank volume with speakers rather than headphones.
I "feel" the same way, but from direct measurement with an SPL meter, 90 db peaks on speakers feels a WHOLE lot louder than 90db peaks with headphones. It's easier to THINK you are listening at a safe level with headphones, and not be...
post #66 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kraegorn View Post
In an attempt to relieve my ears of fatigue, I went to the drug store and bought myself a box of cheap ear plugs. I got about 50 ear plugs for $8 or so. Before I went to sleep that night, I inserted the ear plugs, which made the ringing more up-front and close. Since tinnitus is as much physical as it is mental, the ringing became louder and louder as I concentrated on it. It's a bit of an endurance test if you let it bug you, but as I got up the next morning, I noticed the ringing was gone.
I originally had some success doing this very thing. But after one surgery, it was considerably louder and the plugs no longer had an effect. I do still use plugs whenever I am doing anything that generates noise, even lawn mowing.

I also did some research as I was curious why my tinitus decided to get so much louder after surgery. I found out that some drugs can cause or aggravate tinitus. Most seem to be used to put patients to sleep, but a few people have been affected by other drugs. Needless to say, I did not find this comforting and now insist on knowing all and any medications that may be used on me during anyy proceedures, even at the dentist.
post #67 of 181
I've had tinnitus all my life. It is generally quiet but flares up at times. I'm just so used to it that it doesn't bother me much. Mine was caused by ear infections when I was little, and I had some hearing loss from that and ear infections during my early teens.

And wow this is an old thread
post #68 of 181
Please note guys that hearing something when it is perfectly quite doesn't neccessarily mean you have tinnitus, it can be caused my the ambience in your room, or the blood flow in your body.
post #69 of 181
Yup, it's absolutely normal to hear some sort of soft ringing in the ears in a dead quiet room.
post #70 of 181
I went and saw an audiologist last year because I was convinced that the tinnitus that I've had more or less since seeing Morrissey in 1991 meant I was going deaf. My hearing tested actually high-normal for a male of 36.

Unless it's really quiet, I don't really notice it that much. Getting a normal audiogram made it much easier to ignore it, because the more you obsess over it, the worse it seems and the harder it is to ignore.

I find that allergies and sinus congestion make my tinnitus worse. I might actually have a mild case of hyperacusia, because I find that high-frequency noise (the whine of computer hard drives, CRT's in computer monitors or TV sets, some lights) are very noticeable and seem to bring the ringing in my ears out more. I lowered the high-shelf filter (over 12KHz) in Rockbox by 3dB and it's much less fatiguing to my ears, too.
post #71 of 181
I only have a high noise floor in one of my ears due to damage sustained to my eardrum.
post #72 of 181
cure for tinnitus: have headphones on constantly!

actually, my father has had tinnitus since 1990 and it has affected his sleep greatly. im a little afraid that there is a genetic component to the disease and its probably made worse by this hobby. during my latest physical though, my hearing was tested to be perfectly normal (95th percentile or something) so maybe i have a few more years left in me.
post #73 of 181
I do get it occasionally in one ear, usually while lying in bed in the morning or at night. When this happens it's definitely distracting and seems quite loud, enough to drown out ambient noise and my clock radio. Thankfully it only lasts for maybe 10-30 seconds and goes away. The rest of the time I don't have any ringing unless I've just subjected my poor ears to a nightclub or concert, in which case it usually passes after a day or two.
post #74 of 181
No tinnitus here. When there's no sound, I really hear nothing.
Sometimes I hear some noise if I have my earplugs in, but I assume that's just due to the blood pressure in the ear canal.
post #75 of 181
how do you find a silent room? I think cities are homogenously ringing with electronic noise
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